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Forum topic by Dollarbill posted 2724 days ago 2285 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Dollarbill

91 posts in 2724 days


2724 days ago

I am starting a project making round moulding for a column base (five layers tall) that will be outdoors. Each layer will be build in 8 segments cut at 22 1/2 degrees.

Anyone had experence using Bondo outdoors to fill cracks? Srinkage or cracking problems?

Any other suggestions?

-- Make Dust


9 replies so far

View Ethan Sincox's profile

Ethan Sincox

765 posts in 2760 days


#1 posted 2724 days ago

What kind of wood are you using for the columns?

If you’re going to stain the wood, instead of paint it, you should consider a stainable wood filler.

If you’re going to paint the wood, instead of stain it, the bondo should work just as well as anything else. And it is probably less expensive than woodfiller.

By the way, if you’re planning on using MDF for all of the column work, you should consider sealing it with sanding sealer or maybe even a thin spreading of the bondo over the entire surface. It is an additional step, but it will give you much nicer, smoother results.

-- Ethan, http://thekiltedwoodworker.com

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 2885 days


#2 posted 2724 days ago

If you use Polyurethane glue like Gorrilla glue It’s waterproof, & if you have small gaps in your joints, it swells up while curing. It also sands out easily. You may not need Bondo.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View frank's profile

frank

1492 posts in 2792 days


#3 posted 2723 days ago

Hi Dollarbill;
I wrote about a piece, a ‘live edge’ walnut slab yesterday on my blog at: http://lumberjocks.com/jocks/frank/blog/204 where I posted some photos of a polymer putty I sometimes use for filling wood where I want the wood to be stable.

I have found that with wood movement over time, that the bondos will separate, crack and fall out of place. In the piece shown on my blog, in that ‘crutch area’ where I wanted and needed to have stability and no fall-out, I have been using a product called EZ-Poly Wood REBUILDER, which is made by: Valiant Technologies, Inc.. www.ez-poly.net/wood_rebuilder.htm

Being a two-part polymer puts this product on the plastic side of the chemical tree and can be used for structual repair in construction, woodworking and marine applications. In my talks with the folks there, they have always answered any and all questions that I have had, and was also amazed as to how this product can be applied under water for marine repairs.

I use this product since I can also tint to the color shade I am after, with artist chalk, which I grind to powder and it pours well. Kind of thick pouring for about two minutes and then a couple more minutes to use a putty knife. Just don’t make more then you can use in the time allowed and you will do fine. Sets up good, can be drilled and shaped with machines and like I said it ‘is stable’, ‘stablizes the wood’ and does not fall out. Also unlike epoxy which heats up in the cure process, there is no heat up with the polymers.

Found it first in a True Value Hardware, however I now order from Valient Technologies out of CA; which is the cheaper way to go if you are looking to buy in bulk size.

GODSPEED,
Frank

-- --frank, NH, http://rusticwoodart.tumblr.com/

View Karson's profile

Karson

34847 posts in 2986 days


#4 posted 2723 days ago

Frank: That is an interesting product. I’ve used Bondo but never in outdoor applications.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View Ethan Sincox's profile

Ethan Sincox

765 posts in 2760 days


#5 posted 2723 days ago

Dick,

As an aside note, Gorilla Glue might appear to swell up when curing, but it is definitely not a gap-filling glue. That white foamy stuff has no structural strength to speak of. You need to have surface-to-surface contact with your wood in order for GG to work properly. If you have voids or gaps to fill, you should use an epoxy or the EZ-poly Frank mentioned above.

-- Ethan, http://thekiltedwoodworker.com

View Dollarbill's profile

Dollarbill

91 posts in 2724 days


#6 posted 2723 days ago

Thanks for your help guys, I am going to try the Poly.
Make Dust,
Dollarbill

-- Make Dust

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 2885 days


#7 posted 2723 days ago

Ethan
If you cut your angles accurrately, you don’t leave a large gap, & Polyurethane glue is plenty strong as a filler. That’s what I meant.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 2885 days


#8 posted 2722 days ago

Frank.
Sorry I didn’t have time to check on the EZ-Poly yesterday, I looked today, & it looks like some pretty good stuff.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View jockmike2's profile

jockmike2

10635 posts in 2832 days


#9 posted 2722 days ago

If there is no stress on it, you could use that expanding foam for insulation. Then when it dries carve out whatever design you want. I’ve used bondo too in all kinds of weather. It’s hard to work with in the cold. But would work. I’ve used that foam to fill some pretty big holes. You can even put silicone sealor on in when it dries to get a smooth finish. mike

-- (You just have to please the man in the Mirror) Mike from Michigan -

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