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Is resawing always a crapshoot?

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Forum topic by ColonelTravis posted 12-03-2015 02:28 AM 901 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ColonelTravis

1192 posts in 1360 days


12-03-2015 02:28 AM

Topic tags/keywords: resaw bandsaw

Not having much luck resawing wood that’s been dried properly, different kinds. Everything curls up, bows, cups, etc. some way by the next day. The only thing that’s been stable for me after slicing it is 4/4 cherry. I understand tension problems and there’s no guarantee you’ll always get something usable, but are there any helpful hints to resawing?


14 replies so far

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fuigb

404 posts in 2424 days


#1 posted 12-03-2015 02:50 AM

A bad board is a bad board and they’re to be expected, but everything is curling and cupping? Stock must be wetter than you realize. Must be because no one has consistently bad luck. Try resawing a piece that you know to be dead dry. If you get the same result then… you’re cursed.

-- - Crud. Go tell your mother that I need a Band-aid.

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Jim Finn

2417 posts in 2388 days


#2 posted 12-03-2015 02:56 AM

I have found that wood (oak) that is stored outside in the cold needs a few days in the warm shop or else when it is re-sawn it cups badly.

-- "You may have your PHD but I have my GED and my DD 214"

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splatman

563 posts in 865 days


#3 posted 12-03-2015 03:06 AM

Do you mean, the wood cuts straight, then warps overnight? Sounds like the moisture content inside the wood is higher than at the surface. Resawing exposes the moister interior. After cutting, sticker-stack the lumber, weight or clamp, and wait a few days.
The closest problem I’ve had, is so-called reaction wood: wood that has hidden internal stresses that rear their ugly heads when the lumber is ripped. Last time I had this problem, I stacked the freshly-ripped, higher-than-ideal-MC wood in a little sticker-stack, clamped the doo-doo out of it, then set it aside for a few months. The wood came out much less warped then it was on Rip Day.

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ColonelTravis

1192 posts in 1360 days


#4 posted 12-03-2015 03:22 AM

OK, good to know. I’m obviously not using wood that’s as dry as I think. Maybe Santa will bring me a good moisture meter.

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RobS888

1986 posts in 1311 days


#5 posted 12-03-2015 03:41 AM

Tie down clamps can help as well, just make sure your stickers are wider than the wood. DAMHIK!

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

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rwe2156

2198 posts in 947 days


#6 posted 12-03-2015 12:56 PM

Common problem when resawing, especially when sawing right down the middle.
Gradient of moisture even in cured wood will inevitably cause cupping.

I sticker and clamp between 2 flat, heavy timbers leave in clamps for several days in a climate controlled area or wrapped in plastic (and cross fingers). All you want to do is stabilize the wood this requires constant humidity and no air movement.

Cutting it oversize gives you some room for incremental jointing/planing (key word: incremental)

Eventually the wood stabilizes——except for those rascally boards with built in tension…...

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1187 days


#7 posted 12-03-2015 01:06 PM

Knowing the moisture content is key. I’ve cut oak at 13% mc and it cupped bad and pretty quickly. The same wood at 9% mc stayed flat.

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bearkatwood

1211 posts in 478 days


#8 posted 12-03-2015 01:11 PM

I re-saw quite a bit and there is always tensions in the wood that are waiting to be released. Pay attention to the grain and stay away from flat sawn as it is going to have the biggest tension tangentially. Quartersawn is your best bet, rift sawn will work well, but it is a gamble to weather or not it will cup or bow once opened up. Twist you will be able to see before you saw and can be corrected before sawing. Always, always cut over-sized and plane down to the thickness needed, most of the time this will also give you the extra you need to correct any tension problems. Best of luck.

-- Brian Noel

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BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1836 days


#9 posted 12-03-2015 02:42 PM



I re-saw quite a bit and there is always tensions in the wood that are waiting to be released. Pay attention to the grain and stay away from flat sawn as it is going to have the biggest tension tangentially. Quartersawn is your best bet, rift sawn will work well, but it is a gamble to weather or not it will cup or bow once opened up. Twist you will be able to see before you saw and can be corrected before sawing. Always, always cut over-sized and plane down to the thickness needed, most of the time this will also give you the extra you need to correct any tension problems. Best of luck.

- bearkatwood

+1 to all of this. I don’t resaw anything really big (usually max is 5-6” wide). When I resaw, I try to pick the boards that are closest to quartersawn, and have the least amount of changes in figure and grain direction. Then stack and sticker with weight on top, and plan on jointing again if the boards are thick enough for it. Thinner boards (1/4”) for small panels can usually be coaxed flat by the frame they go in.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View Logan Windram's profile

Logan Windram

303 posts in 1928 days


#10 posted 12-03-2015 03:49 PM

Quarter or Riftsawn is key, but always plan your rough dimensions with the cup in mind. Sticker that stuff for a few days then joint and plane to thickness.

Woodworkers are notorious for wanting to get every darn inch of usuable wood out of a board, but truth is, you waste more by trying to cut it close to maximize a board.

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ColonelTravis

1192 posts in 1360 days


#11 posted 12-03-2015 07:55 PM

Great advice everyone, thanks again.

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teejk02

424 posts in 592 days


#12 posted 12-11-2015 09:29 PM

Started with 2”+ rough cherry that has been stored in my heated shop for more than a year. I carefully squared it up on the table saw, then jointer then back to the table saw to re-square it then to the planer then to the bandsaw for re-saw then back to the planer. Only needed 4 pieces 10 1/2” by 6” and was able to cut the “pins” on the dovetail jig. Let sit a few days and they started to show that “cup”. All grooves were cut to receive the bottom cherry panel and as I tended to the panels decided to clamp the boards in question. Then I heard that dreaded “crack” noise as I tightened the clamps. The crack developed where the heartwood changed to sapwood (would have been fine for the project and actually looks nice when done). Tomorrow I start over…plan of clamping them immediately after they are planed to size.

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rwe2156

2198 posts in 947 days


#13 posted 12-11-2015 11:32 PM

Teejk02: I think some of your problems come from processing the wood incorrectly and doing your joinery before the wood has stabilized.

I would suggest:

1. Cut to rough length (I will use multiples to keep the wood long, but not ponderous. In you’re case, 22” or so).
2. Face joint
3. Square one edge.
4. Resaw
5. Sticker

When you resaw you’re opening up the board internal stresses will come into play as well as moisture in center not the same as outside even if the wood is 100 years old.

Leave it for a week.

1. Check for cupping rejoint face.
2. Plane to rough thickness still keeping material 1/8” big.
3. Sticker again for at least a day or 2.

Leave it for a few days.

1. Check again for cupping & rejoint face.
2. Plane to desired thickness.
3. Rejoint 1 edge square.
4. Rip to width.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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teejk02

424 posts in 592 days


#14 posted 12-12-2015 03:34 PM

rwe…thanks for the tips. My technique for machining differs a bit because my stock is “rough” (like REALLY rough). I square 1 edge to begin with because I find it helps a lot in the jointer phase if I can keep one face tight to the fence. Then I plane to achieve uniform thickness and again square up both edges because I am “resaw challenged” and find it easier to make shallow cuts using my table saw (instead of using a pencil)...I find it speeds the resaw process because the band-saw blade has no choice other than to track the table saw cuts. I’ve never had a problem before but I think this is the first time that I started with a 2+” thick piece AND it had a mix of heartwood and sapwood…I’m sure they have a tendency to move at different rates and directions when “opened up”. I’ll take your advice and “slow down” when I try again allowing it to stabilize before moving on. Probably more waste but when I think about it no more than having to chuck a badly cupped board.

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