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What kind of planer wpould you buy?

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Forum topic by jarruda144 posted 01-03-2010 09:39 PM 2851 views 0 times favorited 29 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jarruda144

4 posts in 2752 days


01-03-2010 09:39 PM

I just had a talk with the boss (my wife) and I finally convinced her that I am in desperate need of a planer and she said O.K. so I’m jumping on the opportunity before she changes her mind.
One thing though, I’ve never owned one and am not sure which will meet my needs I was hoping someone will have some advice and hopefully point me in the right direction. The three brands that are available locally at Home Depot are Ryobi AP1301 at about $240.00 cdn$, Rigid R4330 $500, and the dewalt DW735(which would match my scroll saw just beautifully) $700.00 but I don’t want to scare her away with the price. I mainly would use it for scrolling but I’m sure I would find other uses for it. Also is there video on how to use a planer somewhere? I seem to learn better if I have some visual to guide me.
Hope someone can help!


29 replies so far

View syenefarmer's profile

syenefarmer

431 posts in 2541 days


#1 posted 01-03-2010 09:44 PM

Stay clear of the Ryobi but the Ridgid or the DeWalt are both excellent planers. The DeWalt has more features than the Ridgid and is usually considered the top of the line as far as benchtop planers is concerned. When I was in the market, I choose the DeWalt and have not regretted that decision at all.

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knotscott

7208 posts in 2836 days


#2 posted 01-03-2010 09:55 PM

The R4330 is a good planer for the money, as is the DeWalt DW734. The DW735 has more features but the price approaches the range at which I’d consider getting a cast iron stationary planer with an induction motor as opposed to a portable. The DW735 does have a chip ejector that’d be handy if you don’t have a dust collector. If you decide to stick with a portable, I’d also consider the Delta 22-580 and Delta TP400, but not the TP305 or the AP1301 because both are more prone to snipe.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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reggiek

2240 posts in 2731 days


#3 posted 01-03-2010 09:58 PM

The only benchtop planer I have had was the Dewalt. It was a very nice machine for its capacity….I used the heck out of it too…..now I have a bigger model Grizzly and it gets some serious use.

Basically, a planer cuts a flat surface on one side of wood – and you can make the wood any thickness (down to whatever your machines limits are).....they all have an infeed and an outfeed….usually feed rollers for moving the work accross the cutters (cutters are either blades or rotary cutters)...a wheel or dial to set the depth and that is about it on the mechanical side. The trick is getting one side of your wood flat (that is why most folks rely on a jointer)....from then on you can plane to what thickness and flatness you need. You can turn a piece in any configuration to plane any face that you need….and you can make jigs or such so you can basically plane any smaller sized pieces – or angles also.

Check out You Tube for videos….I believe there are several on planing….although alot of them are about setting the knives which can be tedious. Like hand planes – the knives will get dull and or wear out. so you need to teach yourself how to sharpen and how to remove and replace – it is not that difficult…just tedious.

-- Woodworking.....My small slice of heaven!

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Sawkerf

1730 posts in 2529 days


#4 posted 01-03-2010 10:01 PM

I upgraded from my old Delta 12.5” planer to the DeWalt 735 a couple of months ago and feel that it was well worth the money. Of course, I’m “sorta retired” and have a one man cabinet/furniture business that’s doing pretty well, so my planer gets pretty heavy use.

You say that you’ll mainly use it for scrolling, so I assume that you’ll be mostly working with fairly small, thin, stock. If that’s right, you might find that one of the less expensive planers (including the Ryobi) might be just fine for your needs. I can’t speak to the quality of the newer Delta planers, but I got my old one in the mid-80’s and it was a real workhorse until this past year when it started showing its age.

I also recommend getting the fold down table extensions with whatever you buy (assuming they aren’t included) I find that table extensions really help reduce snipe.

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

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BlankMan

1488 posts in 2814 days


#5 posted 01-03-2010 10:04 PM

I’d go with the 735, I have one and like it. You can get it for around $600 at the moment maybe even less. Home Depot is selling it for $649 and with a 10% HD or Lowes coupon that immediately brings it down to $584 and the coupons are easy to come by.

Scott, you keep touting cast iron induction motor planers due to the 735’s price but I don’t think you’re being fair by not mentioning the trade off in performance, i.e. finish, snipe, etc. if indeed they is a difference. The 735 is the best planer I’ve used when it comes to finish (less sanding) and no (yes no) snipe. My old Delta produced a lot of snipe.

-- -Curt, Milwaukee, WI

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jarruda144

4 posts in 2752 days


#6 posted 01-03-2010 10:25 PM

Thanks for the input guy’s, I’ve narrowed it down to the rigid or the dewalt but I am now curious about the delta, HD up here in Canada or at least in my area doesn’t carry it, I can’t go stationary because my 11×8 foot garden shed/workshop can’t handle it. Anyway I’ve got a couple of weeks before a decision is required so I’ll have some thinking to do. Thanks again!

View John's profile

John

190 posts in 3044 days


#7 posted 01-03-2010 10:50 PM

The HD had the DW 735 on closeout a while back for $275. I recently saw one guy who had two new ones for sale in the box for $350. Keep looking around and maybe you’ll find one. Keep in mind that if you are going to be working with rough stock, you will also need a jointer to flatten one side before you use the planer. If you put a warped/bowed/cupped/etc board through the planer, you will probably wind up with a warped board that is smooth on both sides. There are methods to use to flatten boards with a planer without jointing them first but it is a little more time consuming.

-- John, Long Island, NY

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reggiek

2240 posts in 2731 days


#8 posted 01-03-2010 11:04 PM

One word on “snipe.” Just making sure everyone knows what that means from a planer – I know I had to look it up when I didn’t. Snipe refers to a indentation or indentations in the wood – mostly it somewhat resembles waves on water….it can be caused by the feed rollers jamming (allowing the cutter to stutter and take bigger bites then when the wood moves accross the face smoothly (alot ot times because the “flat” side of the wood is not flat). Other causes are the cutters being misaligned, dull or cutting at different rates due to grain. There are more causes…but these are the most well known. Planers have other issues the same as saws…chip out…planer cutter grooves…etc. All of these can be minimized and or eliminated by maintaining your planer correctly and paying attention when the planer starts to get out of alignment. I have heard some folks believe that the rotary cutters reduce or eliminate snipe….this is not exactly true….you still must maintain your planer correctly or a rotary will snipe as bad or even worse then the bladed cutters. I have both a rotary planer and a knive planer and both work excellent when they are tuned correctly.

Sorry about the long post….but hope is is helpful….otherwise just remember I like to define things….and just skip to another post..

-- Woodworking.....My small slice of heaven!

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knotscott

7208 posts in 2836 days


#9 posted 01-03-2010 11:13 PM

”...Scott, you keep touting cast iron induction motor planers due to the 735’s price but I don’t think you’re being fair by not mentioning the trade off in performance, i.e. finish, snipe, etc. if indeed they is a difference. The 735 is the best planer I’ve used when it comes to finish (less sanding) and no (yes no) snipe. My old Delta produced a lot of snipe.”

I did mention the benefit of the chip ejector. I didn’t really have time to detail differences either way, but it’s only logical IMO to also consider the benefits of the construction of a stationary planer as you near that price range. I consider the stationary planers to be lifetime acquisitions with moderate maintenance, but the life expectancy of most portables can’t be 10-15 years or so on average (just a “WAG” on my part). As I mentioned in last week’s thread, I consider finish and snipe to be largely influenced by setup and blade condition…that’s not to say the 735 doesn’t have excellent “potential”, but knife condition and setup are both variables, and problematic edge life of the 735’s knives has been widely questioned on the web. For $300 I’d be all over the DW735, at $700 I’m scrutinizing all possibilities. Just trying to offer the OP as many logical choices as possible.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View BlankMan's profile

BlankMan

1488 posts in 2814 days


#10 posted 01-03-2010 11:23 PM

reggiek, what I am referring to as snipe is the 2-3” at the beginning and end of the board that is cut deeper thus making the board thinner in those areas. It is usually caused by the board only being held down by one roller at that time and/or the cutterhead assembly not having a lock preventing it from moving up by the pressure exerted on the board by the rollers and then down when a roller is no longer putting pressure on the board.

As far as snipe along the board that is a function of the number of knives, rotational speed of the head and feed rate. Most good planers now a days do not produce what you’re referring to as snipe, at least that I have seen. My old 8” jointer used to do that, you could see them, but my DJ-20 doesn’t nor does my 735 do that.

-- -Curt, Milwaukee, WI

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4541 posts in 2535 days


#11 posted 01-03-2010 11:34 PM

I have had my DeWalt DW733 for over 10 years. This is the basic 2 knife version. It has always worked great and it has never given me any problems other than the ones noted below.

It originally came with a plastic dust hood with a port for a 2.5” hose. The plastic dust hood did not hold up well. I replaced it with a metal dust hood with a port for a 4” hose. That works great.

In general, snipe is not a problem. However, every once in a while I will get some snipe. It is almost like a random event. I have never figured out what circumstances cause the occasional snipe problem.

I don’t think you can buy this particular model any more. Just consider this a general DeWalt endorsement.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

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RKW

328 posts in 2908 days


#12 posted 01-03-2010 11:37 PM

There are two different rigid planers that home depot sales, if you go with rigid be sure to get the three knife planer, i have this planer and im happy with it. I was thinking i paid around $380 for it around this time last year. It is the first and only one i have owned. The infeed and outfeed tables seem to be bigger and more stable than others that i have seen. If i had it to do over, i would probably buy the same one.

-- RKWoods

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BlankMan

1488 posts in 2814 days


#13 posted 01-03-2010 11:38 PM

Scott, I tend to agree with you on the length of the overall life, I’ll let you know. :) But I guess my criteria is finish and snipe so I have to do less sanding and not waste wood. I would probably not use a 735 in a production environment but a lot of us here are hobbyists and based on that it might last for our lifetime. I see the motor as possibly a long term weak point possibly in the time frame you mention but it comes down to amount of use and it certainly has enough power. That may not be a replaceable item at the end of that time nor the rollers. I’d consider a stationary planer like you mention if I could fit it and, but more importantly, it performed as well as the 735 in the finish and snipe area. I wish I could see a real world comparison up close. And the knives, yes, they do sometimes nick and being one of the biggest complainers about that caught DeWalt’s attention who contacted me and I can say steps are in the works to correct that issue, but it does seem to be taking a while though maybe some fault of my own. I don’t know that/if it will ever be resolved but the planer does such a good job I chose to live with it, if it didn’t I wouldn’t. But I am considering a Shelix for it if DeWalt doesn’t resolve it when I run out of knives (I still have 3 packaged sets).

-- -Curt, Milwaukee, WI

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reggiek

2240 posts in 2731 days


#14 posted 01-03-2010 11:45 PM

Thanks BlankMan….just wanted to make sure we were all considering the same thing….I have heard some folks calling the blade marks from dull blades as snipe. I can tell you though that I have seen the indentations in the middle of a board when the flat side was not flat…but mostly I wanted to relate that all planers can snipe and the only true remedy is maintenance and alignment.

-- Woodworking.....My small slice of heaven!

View juniorjock's profile

juniorjock

1930 posts in 3226 days


#15 posted 01-04-2010 01:53 AM

Search the web for the lowest price on the planer you’re interested in. When you find the lowest price, print it out and take it to Lowes, Home Depot or whoever…..... they all match low prices. I think Lowes even gives you an extra 10% off. Good Luck.

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