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Forum topic by Rick M posted 12-02-2015 03:39 AM 921 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Rick M

7933 posts in 1846 days


12-02-2015 03:39 AM

Bought a bunch of machinist stuff at auction to get a few tools I wanted, some of this stuff I have no idea what it is. Anyone recognize this stuff?

1.

2.

3. SOLVED, hold down bolt

4. 3 pics, looks like an air tool something or other

5.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/


18 replies so far

View esmthin's profile

esmthin

77 posts in 647 days


#1 posted 12-02-2015 04:58 AM

The stuff in the first pic looks like they might be cutters for a mill. However, I’m not a machinist, so take my advice with a grain of salt.

-- Ethan, https://instagram.com/ethan_woodworker/

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

5731 posts in 2834 days


#2 posted 12-02-2015 07:45 AM

Picture #1 look like milling cutters, some with Morse tapers.
Picture #2 looks like a lathe tool holder and tool for a metal cutting lathe.

The others ….. ?

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 697 days


#3 posted 12-02-2015 11:24 AM

pic 1, cutter 1 looks like it could be a boring bar for the lathe.
pic 1 cutters 2 and 3, like stated above look to be endmills with a morse taper.
pic 2, still thinking but it could be tooling for a lathe. doubt it.
Pic 3, looks to be a hold down that goes in the T slot of a mill (or DP).
Pic 4, I agree, a quick connect for some form of air tool.
Pic 5, this had me wondering but i think it could be for mounting a dial indicator to.

Dad was a machinest, but those skills arent passed on via childbirth.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View kaerlighedsbamsen's profile

kaerlighedsbamsen

1177 posts in 1180 days


#4 posted 12-02-2015 11:43 AM

Agree on pic 1.
Pic 2 looks custom made so could be anything. Would guess, as it is adjustable, that it is for either a depth stop or some kind of calibration / quality control.
Pic 3 is a holddown bolt that is made so it can be lifted from the t-slot (and not have to be slid all the way to the end. Super practical on lager machines or where several holddowns are used for complex items.
Pic 4 could be for attaching water coolant to long, hollow drills. But not sure
Pic 5 is probably not a tool directly but could be a guide or template. Thinking grinding guide, drill guide, marking guide, template for setting up a specific kind ot tool etc

These 3 items seems to be made for specific machines and their accessories. If you have any idea what they might have been i am sure we can get closer.

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 697 days


#5 posted 12-02-2015 12:00 PM

good one on the coolant call. I didnt think about that. maybe CNC cutting oil?

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

2410 posts in 1981 days


#6 posted 12-02-2015 12:37 PM

Agree, pic #1 are mills, two with Morse tapers. The long one has an allen set for replacing the cutter.
Picture #2 if definitely a depth gauge, I remember old time machinists using them in my first plastic plant in the 70’s. The screw is for tightening the bar when the proper length is set.
Picture #3 is a T slot hold down bolt for probably a tool rest on an old lathe.
Pictures #4 that is definitely a fitting for water soluble oil to be sprayed on a piece while cutting. You can clearly see the rust on the one fitting.
Picture #5 is a drill guide, but I’m not sure about the L handle part. It looks like it might interact with the round post on the bottom to lock into some kind of holder. You can see wear in the holes, where the drill bits were held.

I don’t think any of it is special made – just old and probably not used much anymore by modern day machinists.

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7933 posts in 1846 days


#7 posted 12-02-2015 05:36 PM

More Info:

Here are the markings from the cutters on #1
Cleveland TD Co, 1-1/16”
Brown and Sharp 1/2”, 2MT
P&W MFD USA, 3/4”, 2MT

#5 Came with other stuff. The post that holds the L bar fits in the holes marked with fractions and it came with different size L bars.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 697 days


#8 posted 12-02-2015 07:11 PM

Im sticking to my call of it being for a dial indicator until shown otherwise.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7933 posts in 1846 days


#9 posted 12-02-2015 11:16 PM



Im sticking to my call of it being for a dial indicator until shown otherwise.

- SirIrb

I certainly can’t dispute it.

I’ll probably just lump all the mystery stuff together and throw it on ebay and if no one wants it, toss it in the scrap metal bucket.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Ripthorn's profile

Ripthorn

1406 posts in 2451 days


#10 posted 12-02-2015 11:36 PM

Actually, in pic 1, the first and second cutters are replaceable pilot counterbores, not end mills. The 3rd cutter is indeed an end mill. The other stuff yet to be identified is custom made stuff, likely jigs for specific tools/jobs.

-- Brian T. - Exact science is not an exact science

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4241 posts in 1665 days


#11 posted 12-02-2015 11:44 PM

#5 appears to be some kind of positioning jig… using the ‘holes’ to get a pre-defined distance – 1/2”, 5/16”, 1-3/8” (and I can’t make out the other two) from the pivot point. Most likely pivots on the bushing with a screw, but I got no idea about the replaceable arms of different length or what those may be used for.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7933 posts in 1846 days


#12 posted 12-03-2015 04:47 AM

Brian thanks for the terminology, this stuff is all foreign to me a wood butcher. I started buying all these lots of machinist tools because I wanted some better quality squares, calipers, etc. I’ve found some pretty neat stuff.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7933 posts in 1846 days


#13 posted 12-03-2015 04:52 AM

Oh, I meant to ask, does this mark mean anything to anyone? It’s on a countersink. The N H S V M part?

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

5731 posts in 2834 days


#14 posted 12-03-2015 07:29 AM

I believe the the H S refers to High Speed steel and the V M refers to Victor Machinery.
That’s my guess!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View REO's profile

REO

889 posts in 1540 days


#15 posted 12-03-2015 11:10 AM

first photo spot facing bits. the third I would be leary of useing as a mill cutter without something to hold them in place any taper will work free from the bore with a side load. I have seen several tapered drill chuck adapters drop out and spinn like a top when someone attempted to use the drill for a mll. I would agree with the depth or marking gage call, what is the size of the bore and the od of the smooth od on the “coolant” adapter? could just be a collet for small drill in a large chuck or for a mill collet. number five is a cam positioner for a jig. rocking on the fixed post the pin is put in varying holes to adjust dimension between face and stop. looks like 32nd increments from 3/8-1/2” check dimensions from center of fixed pin to center of individual holes.

showing 1 through 15 of 18 replies

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