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Looking at table tops. What would I call this method, so my searches turn up better results?

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Forum topic by derrick3636 posted 12-02-2015 12:39 AM 567 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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derrick3636

70 posts in 598 days


12-02-2015 12:39 AM

Hello again

I little while back I asked some questions about a table I’m planning for our dining room. I came up with a few more that I’m hoping LJ can help me out with.

This time I’m wondering about the table top itself. I’ve read all kinds of thread about breadboards, grain pattern, etc. A lot of it is starting to make sense, but I’m no where near ready to get started.

I found this thread: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/96198 The member built(what I consider)a beautiful table. When I looked at it a little closer, in the unfinished pictures, it looks like he has stacked pieces of(I’m guessing)4/4 alder to arive at whatever overall thickness the table ends up being. If this is the truth, I’m guessing it was done because 4/4 is cheaper than buying 8/4. Really I have no idea though.

Now when I tried to search this method, I don’t come up with a lot of good results. Most of the stuff talks about building up the edges of the table tops so they appear thicker.

Now, I’m not 100% sure or even 50% sure, but I think that the table that I’d be replacing is 1-3/4 thick all the way across. If I wanted to duplicate that, is stacking 4/4 boards together to achieve that thickness an acceptable method? Are their problems going about it in this manner? Is it better to just start with 8/4?

Sorry that I’m all over the place with these questions.

Here is a table similar to what I’m looking to do: http://www.restoredtimbers.com/irish-coast-table
The design is close to what we have already, but ours had a clean finish to it, to where you couldn’t see any glue lines or anything like that. In other words, it doesn’t look like individual boards glued together. It looks like one solid piece.

Any help would be awesome.

Thank you.

Derrick


10 replies so far

View Gixxerjoe04's profile

Gixxerjoe04

835 posts in 1037 days


#1 posted 12-02-2015 01:38 AM

Not sure why he glued together the top like that, assume because he didn’t have 8/4 to use. Not sure of any problems with doing that since all the grain direction is the same and same wood, would assume it’d all move pretty uniformly. Of course if I was going to make a table top thick like that, would def find wood thick enough to use and not have to do that. Usually 8/4 is a little more expensive usually 50 cents to $1 more a bf, but that’s not enough to justify taking all the extra time to do that with 4/4 stuff.

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derrick3636

70 posts in 598 days


#2 posted 12-02-2015 02:28 AM

Ok. That makes sense. I’m not totally sure that’s what was done here. It just looks that way to me. I didn’t know if it was a common practice, or if something else was involved.

Thank you for the insight.

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

805 posts in 2309 days


#3 posted 12-02-2015 02:32 AM

Derrick, I could see the design concept for the MASS of the stock for the LJ build and the 3ply glue up in the legs, but I don’t really understand the need for a top that thick for a dining table.

I could understand a top that thick for a workbench type of table but if I were building that table I’d go with 4/4 for the top and then a 1”apron to give the illusion of a massive top without the PITA factor of dealing with a top that thick, plus a lower cost for lumber.

The example of what you want to build seems wholly different from the first example, & I think if you were to go to a furniture store and measure most any table you would not find a top over 4/4 thick. If you haven’t tried to build your vision in Sketch up yet I’d really recommend that you push some images around in SU first (Jay Bates has great tutorials on Youtube) I have saved lots of $$$ & Time getting ideas drawn first and being able to see if my thoughts are actually the same as the 3D

Good Luck- Chef Derek

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View derrick3636's profile

derrick3636

70 posts in 598 days


#4 posted 12-02-2015 02:40 AM



Derrick, I could see the design concept for the MASS of the stock for the LJ build and the 3ply glue up in the legs, but I don t really understand the need for a top that thick for a dining table.

I could understand a top that thick for a workbench type of table but if I were building that table I d go with 4/4 for the top and then a 1”apron to give the illusion of a massive top without the PITA factor of dealing with a top that thick, plus a lower cost for lumber.

The example of what you want to build seems wholly different from the first example, & I think if you were to go to a furniture store and measure most any table you would not find a top over 4/4 thick. If you haven t tried to build your vision in Sketch up yet I d really recommend that you push some images around in SU first (Jay Bates has great tutorials on Youtube) I have saved lots of $$$ & Time getting ideas drawn first and being able to see if my thoughts are actually the same as the 3D

Good Luck- Chef Derek

- ChefHDAN

Well now you have me intrigued. Once I’m finished with this deployment, I’ll really have to look under our table to see if it is just 4/4 with thicker apron. I bet you’re right about that…
In the mean time, I’ll have to try and find some similar examples on LJ and the rest of the web.

Thanks for the heads up on SU. I see people posting about it everywhere i look now, I just haven’t taken the time to really look into it yet.

Thank you for all of the info!!

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

14536 posts in 2143 days


#5 posted 12-02-2015 02:47 AM

The dinning room table we have has that edge “Treatment”, but,....it is a 3/4 mated to a 6/4…..and they made not attemp to hide the joint…..bleh.

I have heard of a way to make such a top, where the edges are thicker. They would build the main top, but over size it. Then they would rip the over sized areas off. rotate them around (like swinging a door, down and right under the top) and glue the four edges onto the top. All the grain would then match, even the end grain ends. They would do it so no glue line would show, either.

Just an idea…..

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

805 posts in 2309 days


#6 posted 12-02-2015 03:12 AM

Well if you’re deployed away from your tools you NEED SU, you can draw that table 6 ways to Sunday and be ready to make dust as soon as you get stateside!

Thanks for your service!

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View derrick3636's profile

derrick3636

70 posts in 598 days


#7 posted 12-02-2015 03:17 AM



The dinning room table we have has that edge “Treatment”, but,....it is a 3/4 mated to a 6/4…..and they made not attemp to hide the joint…..bleh.

I have heard of a way to make such a top, where the edges are thicker. They would build the main top, but over size it. Then they would rip the over sized areas off. rotate them around (like swinging a door, down and right under the top) and glue the four edges onto the top. All the grain would then match, even the end grain ends. They would do it so no glue line would show, either.

Just an idea…..

- bandit571

Interesting you say that. In one of my google searches, this turned up:
https://wunderwoods.wordpress.com/2013/09/17/how-to-make-a-thick-countertop-out-of-thin-wood/

Is that what’s going on in that article? I was trying to wrap my brain around everything that was going on.

View derrick3636's profile

derrick3636

70 posts in 598 days


#8 posted 12-02-2015 03:17 AM



Well if you re deployed away from your tools you NEED SU, you can draw that table 6 ways to Sunday and be ready to make dust as soon as you get stateside!

Thanks for your service!

- ChefHDAN

Very good point!!

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

14536 posts in 2143 days


#9 posted 12-02-2015 03:28 AM

The dinning room table we have has that edge “Treatment”, but,....it is a 3/4 mated to a 6/4…..and they made not attemp to hide the joint…..bleh.

I have heard of a way to make such a top, where the edges are thicker. They would build the main top, but over size it. Then they would rip the over sized areas off. rotate them around (like swinging a door, down and right under the top) and glue the four edges onto the top. All the grain would then match, even the end grain ends. They would do it so no glue line would show, either.

Just an idea…..

- bandit571

Interesting you say that. In one of my google searches, this turned up:
https://wunderwoods.wordpress.com/2013/09/17/how-to-make-a-thick-countertop-out-of-thin-wood/

Is that what s going on in that article? I was trying to wrap my brain around everything that was going on.

- derrick3636


Yep, I even made a table like that a long time ago. Just do the end grain first then the sides, with the miter joint at the corners. Keep an eye on the grain pattern to get a good match.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View derrick3636's profile

derrick3636

70 posts in 598 days


#10 posted 12-02-2015 03:37 AM


Yep, I even made a table like that a long time ago. Just do the end grain first the the sides, with the miter joint at the corners. Keep an eye on the grain pattern to get a good match.

- bandit571

Very interesting! I am going to have to do some more reading…

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