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Hybrid Table Saw Recomendations

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Forum topic by cajunworkshop posted 12-01-2015 06:48 PM 791 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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cajunworkshop

47 posts in 463 days


12-01-2015 06:48 PM

I want to upgrade my job site table saw to a hybrid. I can’t get a cabinet due to room in my 12×24 shop. I have no preference and just started researching. Would like left tilting, great fence, good dust collecting, dado stack plate, 30 inch ,and on wheels. Some of the things I mentioned I could buy seperately if a great saw is recommended that does not have those things. Would like to keep price below $1600. Are there any good site reviews on table saws? A magezine revieuw? Thanks in advance for the advice

-- Cajun Workshop Greenville, SC


22 replies so far

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ste6168

250 posts in 639 days


#1 posted 12-01-2015 07:38 PM

Sawstop? $1600 seems like a lot for a hybrid… Why can’t you fit a cabinet, same size as a hybrid in most cases…

I personally own the Grizzly G0771 hybrid, and so far it has been great. If I have a $1600 budget at the time I purchased (and 220v available) I would have probably bought the G0690. My next saw will probably be a Sawstop, as my 5yo son is starting to take a liking to woodworking, and fixing things.

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cajunworkshop

47 posts in 463 days


#2 posted 12-01-2015 07:42 PM

Don’t have 220 in my shop that is more issue hybrid vs cabinet.

-- Cajun Workshop Greenville, SC

View 716's profile

716

502 posts in 384 days


#3 posted 12-01-2015 07:52 PM


I want to upgrade my job site table saw to a hybrid. I can t get a cabinet due to room in my 12×24 shop.
- cajunworkshop

I did not know that cabinets saws are larger than hybrids. I even thought that for example Grizzly’s g0715P hybrid (60” wide) was larger than their g1023rl cabinet saw (56” wide).

-- It's nice!

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crank49

3981 posts in 2438 days


#4 posted 12-01-2015 08:58 PM

I would not let 240V stop me or control my choice. I would install the power, then get the saw. $1600 should do both.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

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knotscott

7225 posts in 2843 days


#5 posted 12-01-2015 09:10 PM

No difference in footprint for a standard cabinet saw and a hybrid, but the cabinet saw definitely requires 220v. Your budget would allow a Grizzly G1023RL ($1374 shipped), if you could solve the 220v requirement….big jump in power and performance, and you can slide the rails over to get your 30”+ rip.

Top hybrid candidates < $1600 – Jet Proshop, General International 50-200R, Baileigh TS-1044H, Craftsman 22116, Grizzly G0771, (maybe the G0715P if their tech staff can convince you that the alignment problems are really fixed). Not sure how competitive the Delta is at $1k, but the 36-5000 series is in the class of candidates.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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meyer138

9 posts in 762 days


#6 posted 12-02-2015 07:11 AM

Don’t forget the Laguna Fusion. It has won the best hybrid table saw for the last few years. Plus, it can be converted to 220v very easy. $1169.00

I am on the fence with this one or the more Portable Bosch 4100-09…

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jeff

989 posts in 2932 days


#7 posted 12-02-2015 07:24 AM

I agree with crank49.Try to add 220 then get your saw.

-- Jeff,Tucson,Az.

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cajunworkshop

47 posts in 463 days


#8 posted 12-02-2015 11:22 AM

Some great advice. Is there a very noticeable difference in the 220 vs 120 or is the payoff more on effiency and longevity of the motor. I had thought about the Laguna fusion. Going to get a quote on 220 in the shop and decide where to go from there Thanks for the insight.

-- Cajun Workshop Greenville, SC

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knotscott

7225 posts in 2843 days


#9 posted 12-02-2015 01:55 PM


... Is there a very noticeable difference in the 220 vs 120 or is the payoff more on effiency and longevity of the motor. ...Going to get a quote on 220 in the shop and decide where to go from there

- cajunworkshop

220v (aka 240v) supply utilizes two hot legs that split the current load that’s delivered to the motor. 120v (aka 110v) supply utilizes one hot leg, so peak amperage is limited to the max capability of that one hot lead….typically around 15 amps. 220v allows for use of larger motors that require more amperage.

In the case of smaller motors that can run on either 120v or 220v, the actual performance differences are more subtle. 220v lines tend to suffer from less voltage loss during peak amperage demand, so tend to hold up better during heavy load and startup. In theory, if a 120v circuit is completely sufficient for the demands of a given motor, there really shouldn’t be a notable difference. In real world applications, it’s far more common for a 120v circuit to face some voltage loss during peak demand moments, but every circuit is unique. Many times a 120v supply circuit is fine for a motor under 2hp, but a 220v circuit supplying the same motor will always have better peak delivery capability. If a given 120v circuit is marginal, there will be more voltage loss, which can cause more heat, shorter life, slower startup, slower recovery from load, etc. There are a lot of variables involved, and a lot of opinions/debates about the differences, but other than the initial cost, it’s rarely bad to have the option of 220v available, and can be beneficial. If 220v is easily accessible, I’d encourage it’s use….if not, and it’s not needed, it doesn’t make sense to spend heavily on that capability IMO.

p.s. Regarding the Fusion saw: I think you’ll find that the schematics of the trunnion setup are very similar between the Proshop, Baleigh, and Fusion.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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cajunworkshop

47 posts in 463 days


#10 posted 12-02-2015 02:03 PM

Any idea what the typical cost is for a electrian to come wire a 240 outlet

-- Cajun Workshop Greenville, SC

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TheFridge

5765 posts in 953 days


#11 posted 12-02-2015 02:05 PM

hybrid of cabinet will have the same HP on 120v. 1.75hp 120v I think is the max motor available in most saws nowadays.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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Gixxerjoe04

835 posts in 1044 days


#12 posted 12-02-2015 02:09 PM

I have the grizzly 1023rlw, had the rigid 3650 which I believe is considered a hybrid. They were about the same size, had to run 220v in my garage for that and my jointer. My friend helped since I didn’t know what I was doing, wasn’t as difficult as I thought. Of course my rigid was like 10 years old and my grizzly was bought new, but it’s so much nicer. Of course I probably would have been fine with a hybrid right now, bought it thinking of the future and not wanting to have to upgrade again down the road.

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MrUnix

4246 posts in 1666 days


#13 posted 12-02-2015 02:09 PM

Some great advice. Is there a very noticeable difference in the 220 vs 120 or is the payoff more on effiency and longevity of the motor.

I believe the recommendation to get 240v installed was to allow you to run a larger motor rather than being limited to a ~1.5hp saw. Internally, a 240v motor still only sees 120v across its windings, so there is no difference in power or efficiency between the two as far as the motor is concerned. Some may claim a motor will last longer using 240v instead of 120v (usually citing heat or some such reason), but that isn’t so (see above). About the only benefit (besides being able to run a larger motor) is that on 240v, as Scott pointed out, the wiring carries less amperage so you can have longer runs and smaller wire to supply the saw with less loss from the wiring. In a home shop environment, that usually isn’t much of an issue though.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: If you want increased efficiency, go three phase… they are more efficient than a single phase motor, more robust, constant torque even at reduced speeds, and have less parts to go bad – pretty much only the bearings as there is no start circuitry, capacitors, etc.. Of course, you will still need that 240v outlet installed :)

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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Tedstor

1625 posts in 2100 days


#14 posted 12-02-2015 02:16 PM


Any idea what the typical cost is for a electrian to come wire a 240 outlet

- cajunworkshop

Depends on the complexity of the run. If the job requires the wiring to be fished through a lot of walls, it will be more expensive. Rates also seem to be somewhat regional, and vary based on the local cost of living.

But for comparison, I live in a high cost of living area…...I got two 120v circuits ran from the far end of my basement to my garage (one side of the house to the other) for $300. The run wasn’t ‘that’ hard though. Half my basement is unfinished, making the job a lot easier.
As an aside- I should have got a 220v line ran while I was at it…..but I’m a bonehead, so I didn’t. Don’t be a bonehead like me…...if you think you ‘might’ want additional outlets/receptacles in your shop….....have sparky run the wires while he’s doing the 220v job. You’ll be glad you did.

*I should also add that I did not shop around for the best price. The guy I used is regarded as ‘the man’ in my area for residential work like this. He might have been more expensive than his competition.

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knotscott

7225 posts in 2843 days


#15 posted 12-02-2015 02:23 PM



Any idea what the typical cost is for a electrian to come wire a 240 outlet

- cajunworkshop

That’s another variable. We switched our dryer to gas, so the 220v dryer outlet became available, so I ran my shop 220v from that. I did it myself, but it would have been easy for an electrician. A complete install from the breaker box would have been much more complicated.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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