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Stabilizer or not ?

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Forum topic by 716 posted 12-01-2015 06:48 PM 509 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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716

502 posts in 383 days


12-01-2015 06:48 PM

Is the benefits of a stabilizer overweight its negatives on a thin kerf blade ?

I see the following complains about them:
1. When used in pairs the stabilizer moves the blade left for the thickness of one sabilizer so everything on the table saw needs to be retuned. This includes the riving knife, fence, throat inserts….

2. When a single stabilizer is used it warps the blade as the permanent flange on the other side of the blade is smaller in diameter.

Then there are issues such as a possibility to touch zero clearance insert when raising the blade, but they seems to be easier to address.

-- It's nice!


15 replies so far

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 698 days


#1 posted 12-01-2015 06:52 PM

Use a thick kerf blade.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View 716's profile

716

502 posts in 383 days


#2 posted 12-01-2015 07:23 PM



Use a thick kerf blade.

- SirIrb

If let’s say you cut a 10” board into 1/4 stripes you can make 29 stripes with a thin kerf blade and only 26 with a standard kerf.
But you do make 30% more saw dust with a thick kerf blade if that is your goal.

-- It's nice!

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2534 days


#3 posted 12-01-2015 07:29 PM

I used thin kerf blades in a previous life. I had the stabilizer on my RAS and it helped with the whine. It cuts down on cut depth which I did not like on my TS. In the end think it was a marketing thing. I got ti to save on lumber (exotics). Truth be told the savings is minimal and when you get into thicker stock like 12 & 16 quarter, I did not like the deflection. I sold my forrest WWI & WWII and stablizer and moved to regular kerf blades and never looked back.

Unless you have an underpowered saw there is no need.

Thats my opinion but that and a buck fifty will get you a cup of coffee.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7224 posts in 2843 days


#4 posted 12-01-2015 07:32 PM

I good quality thin kerf blade that’s mounted on a saw with low arbor runout that’s cutting flat straight wood generally shouldn’t need a stabilizer. If you have a saw with excessive runout or a blade that’s not quite true, a stabilizer can help, but it doesn’t really solve the root problem. I’ve never noticed a difference with them or without, so I vote not to bother with them. They don’t really hurt anything but your wallet, and they limit cutting height capacity.

A 1/8” full kerf blade does indeed produce more dust than a thin kerf blade….whether or not that’s significant depends on you.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3949 posts in 1960 days


#5 posted 12-01-2015 07:33 PM

I’ve not seen any benefits from using a pair of stabilizers. The cut didn’t seem to be more smooth, and they might reduce the depth of cut. The few TK blades I had were the higher quality blades, maybe they help with some of the cheaper ones; but I found no reason to use the stabilizers, and several reasons not to use them. It’s been some time since I used them, and I’ve switched mostly to full kerf blades at this point.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4244 posts in 1666 days


#6 posted 12-01-2015 07:38 PM

If let s say you cut a 10” board into 1/4 stripes you can make 29 stripes with a thin kerf blade and only 26 with a standard kerf.

For cutting 1/4” strips in a 10” wide board, I’d head for the bandsaw. Trying to do really thin stuff on the table saw isn’t exactly something I like doing :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3927 posts in 2710 days


#7 posted 12-01-2015 08:23 PM

It really comes down to the type of woodworking you do. If you are cutting hard woods, thick woods, construction quality woods, a full kerf blade would be my choice. I do a lot of cutting in soft woods and thin woods for model making which requires fine tooth blades. Thin kerf blades work well for me. The saw has to be perfectly aligned with little or no arbor runout.

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3025 posts in 1265 days


#8 posted 12-01-2015 08:31 PM

+1. I think the deflection issue with TK blades is overblown. If I had a beefy, 220v saw, I’d go full kerf, but I don’t, and I don’t really see a problem with cut quality with sharp blades.


I good quality thin kerf blade that s mounted on a saw with low arbor runout that s cutting flat straight wood generally shouldn t need a stabilizer. If you have a saw with excessive runout or a blade that s not quite true, a stabilizer can help, but it doesn t really solve the root problem. I ve never noticed a difference with them or without, so I vote not to bother with them. They don t really hurt anything but your wallet, and they limit cutting height capacity.

A 1/8” full kerf blade does indeed produce more dust than a thin kerf blade….whether or not that s significant depends on you.

- knotscott


-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1776 days


#9 posted 12-01-2015 09:13 PM

No offense meant to the Japanese, this is a true story.

The guy who used to sharpen my saw blades would say this anytime thin kerf blade came up.

”Thin kerf? Those dammed Japanese found a way to sell less material for more money. I wouldn’t have one”

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Julian's profile

Julian

1039 posts in 2157 days


#10 posted 12-02-2015 03:17 AM

I have been using a thin kerf blade for about 13 years and never had a need to use a stabilizer. I have the Forrest WWII blade and cut all types of wood without any issue. If the table saw is in good working order and the blade is not damaged I don’t see why you need a stabilizer. That’s my 2 cents.

-- Julian

View Karamba's profile

Karamba

116 posts in 403 days


#11 posted 12-02-2015 03:48 AM

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3025 posts in 1265 days


#12 posted 12-02-2015 03:58 AM

the funny thing about that video is that he is using as his example blades:

1) blades much thinner than standard thin kerf (.069-.070 instead of .091 which is the standard table saw blade)
2) they were from a gang rip saw
3) and the saw was overloaded

I don’t see how any of this relates to normal usage on a standard table saw.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 953 days


#13 posted 12-02-2015 04:04 AM

So who uses thin kerfs and would shave a hair off thick stock and trust it?

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2198 posts in 948 days


#14 posted 12-02-2015 12:58 PM



If let s say you cut a 10” board into 1/4 stripes you can make 29 stripes with a thin kerf blade and only 26 with a standard kerf.
But you do make 30% more saw dust with a thick kerf blade if that is your goal.
- 716
Really? Then find an 11” board or cut an inch off another one.

The reason thin kerf blades were made is for low powered machines.

If you’re TS can handle it, you’re always better off with a full kerf blade, IMO.

BTW strips are what you cut, stripes are what you earn ;-)

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View 716's profile

716

502 posts in 383 days


#15 posted 12-02-2015 07:45 PM


Really? Then find an 11” board or cut an inch off another one.
- rwe2156

And now if you do this to make wooden lath to put under stucco on a house you would need to find a lot of “another” boards.

-- It's nice!

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