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Delta 14" Bandsaw model 28-280 brand new in box: Worth the $$?

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Forum topic by TheWoodRaccoon posted 12-01-2015 12:11 AM 1013 views 0 times favorited 33 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TheWoodRaccoon

364 posts in 390 days


12-01-2015 12:11 AM

I came across a guy on eBay who will sell me a bran new in the box Delta 14” bandsaw model 28-280, with a brand new rip fence, for $795. He used to run a warehouse that distributed delta equipment when it was in business. I would really appreciate having a US made piece of history, brand new, much more than the Grizzly G0555 I’ve been eyeing. I’m torn! The G0555 I can get with a riser block and fence for $610 shipped! What should I do guys? Should I get the delta in the hopes that one day I can find an original complete riser block kit for it? Or should I go the cheap route for the Grizzly? Both are great machines, I don’t know what to do….

-- still trying to think of a clever signature......


33 replies so far

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rustfever

716 posts in 2771 days


#1 posted 12-01-2015 12:19 AM

Delta….......Absolutely

-- Rustfever, Central California

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MrUnix

4208 posts in 1660 days


#2 posted 12-01-2015 12:30 AM

The Delta is the original, the Griz is a copy. But he is asking pretty much full retail price, even though it’s a NOS machine and won’t come with a warranty. I’d try to talk him down.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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alittleoff

296 posts in 737 days


#3 posted 12-01-2015 01:39 AM

I’d probably go with the delta. I just bought a 555 grizzly, the anniversary edition . It’s about the prettiest one I’ve seen but its not shown me anything to write home about. I don’t do a lot of sawing on a band saw so it works for me. If I used one a lot I’d want something better. I had a tough time getting it set up, and it’s doing OK now. I don’t think I would buy it again though.
Gerald

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AZWoody

693 posts in 685 days


#4 posted 12-01-2015 02:28 AM

What’s the guy going to charge for shipping on top of the purchase price?
When you’re in that price range, and if you do consider Grizzly an option, then you’re in the price range of a Grizzly 17” bandsaw which would give you higher horsepower and no need to add a riser block.

The Delta would be a great tool but way overpriced in my opinion.

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TheGreatJon

295 posts in 694 days


#5 posted 12-01-2015 03:09 AM

You could get a similar price on a rikon deluxe. Its a great saw which has great resaw capacity and mine cut super clean right out of he box.

...or, for that money you could pick up a real piece of american history with way better capabilities. The Walker Turner linked below is the first thing that popped up on my search. $700, fully restored. Those WT 16” saws are serious performers.

http://joplin.craigslist.org/tls/5279489844.html

-- This is not the signature line you are looking for.

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TheWoodRaccoon

364 posts in 390 days


#6 posted 12-01-2015 04:17 AM



What s the guy going to charge for shipping on top of the purchase price?
When you re in that price range, and if you do consider Grizzly an option, then you re in the price range of a Grizzly 17” bandsaw which would give you higher horsepower and no need to add a riser block.

The Delta would be a great tool but way overpriced in my opinion.

- AZWoody

I dont have room for a 17 inch saw in my small shop. if i did, i probably would get one.
The price is with shipping to a nearby freight terminal! I’m just a little worried that after being in a box for 20 years, will it still be in perfect shape? No rust, a flat table, etc?

-- still trying to think of a clever signature......

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TheWoodRaccoon

364 posts in 390 days


#7 posted 12-01-2015 04:20 AM



You could get a similar price on a rikon deluxe. Its a great saw which has great resaw capacity and mine cut super clean right out of he box.

...or, for that money you could pick up a real piece of american history with way better capabilities. The Walker Turner linked below is the first thing that popped up on my search. $700, fully restored. Those WT 16” saws are serious performers.

http://joplin.craigslist.org/tls/5279489844.html

- TheGreatJon

i was looking at the rikon saws. The 10-325 would be perfect for me when its on sale at $700, but it’s about $300 for shipping. $700 is the top of my budget, and im pushing it to get this delta at $795.

-- still trying to think of a clever signature......

View FancyShoes's profile

FancyShoes

506 posts in 825 days


#8 posted 12-01-2015 04:48 AM

Ive seen used delta 14” bandsaws with a solid base in great conditions sell for $150 at a auctions. Just because it is new in box doesnt mean much. Especially if it is full retail, and especially with no warranty. It is hard for me towant tonspend that much money on ebay when I have heard some pretty bad stories of people not getting what they were told they were getting. If you look around, you will find a great deal. It just may take a couple months. If you are not worried about the cash because you are comfortable spending it, I myself prefer a warranty.

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TheFridge

5764 posts in 947 days


#9 posted 12-01-2015 04:58 AM

Way too much

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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MrUnix

4208 posts in 1660 days


#10 posted 12-01-2015 06:33 AM

I’m just a little worried that after being in a box for 20 years, will it still be in perfect shape? No rust, a flat table, etc?

They are shown still in their original boxes on what is probably the original shipping pallet, and I don’t see any visible damage… so I doubt the table would warp or rust would be much of a concern. However, if it is 20 years old as you indicate, the belts and wheels might have become dried out and/or brittle, and the bearings may need to be replaced. Even though the bearings are new, sealed bearings do have a shelf life. For high end bearings, like SKF (which are probably NOT what is in there, but you never know), SKF has the following to say:

Shelf life of sealed bearings

The maximum storage interval for sealed SKF bearings is dictated by the lubricant inside the bearings. Lubricant deteriorates over time as a result of ageing, condensation, and separation of the oil and thickener. Therefore, sealed bearings should not be stored for more than three years.


(Source: SKF)

Sitting idle in a machine is basically the same as sitting on the shelf unused. And the above assumes a controlled environment (both temp and humidity – see link for details), which that saw may not have been in for its entire life of storage. You might wind up having to do a little work (and expense) to get it into shape even though it’s never been used. If that is something you are willing to do, it might be better to just find a nice used machine with a cast iron base (the one on e-bay is stamped steel). You would save a significant amount of money, and would probably wind up with a better machine. Just saying.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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TheWoodRaccoon

364 posts in 390 days


#11 posted 12-01-2015 12:35 PM



I m just a little worried that after being in a box for 20 years, will it still be in perfect shape? No rust, a flat table, etc?

They are shown still in their original boxes on what is probably the original shipping pallet, and I don t see any visible damage… so I doubt the table would warp or rust would be much of a concern. However, if it is 20 years old as you indicate, the belts and wheels might have become dried out and/or brittle, and the bearings may need to be replaced. Even though the bearings are new, sealed bearings do have a shelf life. For high end bearings, like SKF (which are probably NOT what is in there, but you never know), SKF has the following to say:

Shelf life of sealed bearings

The maximum storage interval for sealed SKF bearings is dictated by the lubricant inside the bearings. Lubricant deteriorates over time as a result of ageing, condensation, and separation of the oil and thickener. Therefore, sealed bearings should not be stored for more than three years.
(Source: SKF)

Sitting idle in a machine is basically the same as sitting on the shelf unused. And the above assumes a controlled environment (both temp and humidity – see link for details), which that saw may not have been in for its entire life of storage. You might wind up having to do a little work (and expense) to get it into shape even though it s never been used. If that is something you are willing to do, it might be better to just find a nice used machine with a cast iron base (the one on e-bay is stamped steel). You would save a significant amount of money, and would probably wind up with a better machine. Just saying.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

How much would bearings cost, and how easy are they to replace?

-- still trying to think of a clever signature......

View bob101's profile

bob101

289 posts in 2911 days


#12 posted 12-01-2015 02:29 PM

that’s way too much new or otherwise, its an old machine! I wouldn’t pay more than a couple hundred for it.

-- rob, ont,canada

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Chris

164 posts in 1045 days


#13 posted 12-01-2015 02:33 PM

I have this bandsaw. It is a great saw. I bought it used off craigslist for $160 and it runs great. However, I would only pay $300 at the very highest if I really wanted that particular bandsaw. Your options with a grizzly when it comes to a fence, riser, and guide system you options would be way more affordable as compared to the delta.

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TheWoodRaccoon

364 posts in 390 days


#14 posted 12-01-2015 02:51 PM

Heres A question:

If I wanted to put on a rise block, theoretically all I would need is th block and longer guide post and bolt right? Would the guards from the original setup work?

-- still trying to think of a clever signature......

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

4208 posts in 1660 days


#15 posted 12-01-2015 04:02 PM

How much would bearings cost, and how easy are they to replace?

Probably around $50 or so. Not too difficult, but you need to pull the upper and lower wheels off to get to them (and pull the lower drive shaft), and split the motor open to replace the ones in there. Figure another $50 or so for tires and a belt if needed.

f I wanted to put on a rise block, theoretically all I would need is th block and longer guide post and bolt right? Would the guards from the original setup work?

Both of the old guards need to be replaced as well, but you could get by if you don’t mind exposed blade :) The guard on the post is metal and would be difficult to make yourself, however you could probably fabricate the rear guard as it’s made out of wood. The original riser kit from Delta had all the stuff you needed, but they are difficult to find now.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: Don’t forget to add in some cash for blades – the one that comes stock isn’t usually all that great.

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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