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Forum topic by Dark_Lightning posted 11-30-2015 03:40 AM 574 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Dark_Lightning

2631 posts in 2569 days


11-30-2015 03:40 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I’m curious. While I realize that sometimes a project just gets built by winging it (I’ve done so myself, especially for little things that the dimensions just don’t matter, as long as it all fits together), who here employs a measured drawing? I see plans online and have bought some, but many times there are dimensions that have to be guessed at. I personally am used to designing to the ASME Y14.100 standard (I worked mainly with metal). I have the software for doing it that way. It’s probably a little overkill for most wood projects. I don’t put all the zones, title blocks and so forth on a drawing, unless I plan to use an outside party to make parts (it does happen; I have some things that I make that using a “regular” carpenter to make the little parts out of the big parts is cost effective). I would imagine that the CNC carving people would use something like that, given that the machine code has to be made.

So, what do you use? Sketchup seems to be popular, but I already have a design platform, so haven’t gone there, yet.

-- Random Orbital Nailer


9 replies so far

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conifur

955 posts in 612 days


#1 posted 11-30-2015 03:50 AM

I dont know all your standards, but most of the wood working plans I have bought have errors on there dimensions, could be cut list to finish cut, and or assembly/size dimensions. It sucks, but if paid for plans I call them on it and get them for free.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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David Taylor

326 posts in 547 days


#2 posted 11-30-2015 04:01 AM

I come from a manufacturing quality background, and lived ASME Y14.100 for years.

One of the things I love about woodworking is getting away from that :)

Usually a piece has to fit in a location, at least somewhat, so that’s the “envelope” dimensions. From there, I start making parts, superimposing one on the other to make them fit to each other.

Trying to work to a drawing with tolerances in wood is not the fun I am here to enjoy, you ask me. And, like conifur says, quite often the plans or cut-list is wrong anyway, and if you build slavishly to it, you don’t notice until it’s nearly too late!

I like the process, the end product usually just gets given away.

Oh, and don’t forget the old adage, file to fit, paint to hide! :)

-- Learn Relentlessly

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AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1769 days


#3 posted 11-30-2015 04:30 AM

I don’t see what ASME Y14.100 standards has to do with woodworking. You see something in you head or magazine, find a napkin and go for it.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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MNgary

295 posts in 1877 days


#4 posted 11-30-2015 05:11 AM

I draft initial sketches on vellum and, when eventually approved, build the prototype. After building the prototype I then go through many iterations to make it commercially producible. Is this what you are asking?

-- I dream of the world where a duck can cross the road and no one asks why.

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MrUnix

4206 posts in 1659 days


#5 posted 11-30-2015 05:17 AM


I don t see what ASME Y14.100 standards has to do with woodworking. You see something in you head or magazine, find a napkin and go for it.

- AlaskaGuy

I prefer the back of a used envelope… napkins are too hard to write on without them tearing :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1769 days


#6 posted 11-30-2015 06:32 AM


I don t see what ASME Y14.100 standards has to do with woodworking. You see something in you head or magazine, find a napkin and go for it.

- AlaskaGuy

I prefer the back of a used envelope… napkins are too hard to write on without them tearing :)

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix


You haven’t tried the ”New Improved Napkins

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View ste6168's profile

ste6168

250 posts in 632 days


#7 posted 11-30-2015 04:41 PM

I recently started using Autodesk Fusion 360. More or less to give me an idea of the final product, though I do use it for converting dimensions to measurements as well.

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Dark_Lightning

2631 posts in 2569 days


#8 posted 11-30-2015 07:24 PM

It depends on the project, as dyfhid says- If it is a shelf or even a whole book case, I just need to figure out how to make it fit. My first tool chest I painted, since it was a prototype. That paint covers a slew of flaws!

Understand, I’m just using it now to draft up the ideas and to develop a cut list. I’m not going all D&T on it, since it is just wood.

MNgary, that is essentially my question. For a one off like a tool chest, I can see winging it. But if I was asked (and have been) to give the design to someone for their own build (which I have done- yes, gave), I’d want the dimensions to be correct. Note that it only shows the dimensions; the details of using the equipment and assembly is on the builder.

My first chest has piston fit drawers on wooden slides. But the new one will be clear finish, and I want it really nice, heirloom quality, so flaws have to be minimized.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

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woodbutcherbynight

2414 posts in 1869 days


#9 posted 12-01-2015 03:23 AM

Standards, man the day I have to start abiding by them for my hobby work I am done. LOL. I am guessing most will say if the opening is 30” by 30” by 10” as long as when you are done it fits, then all is good.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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