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lathe stand height,

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Forum topic by maples posted 1672 days ago 4791 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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maples

63 posts in 1673 days


1672 days ago

hello guys ,

I have a craftsman lathe that I have had new for quite a few years and never found the time to set it up, It does not have a stand on it, but I have all the tools and things for it, my two sons are asking about setting it up and how it works and such, so that is my inspiration to finally get it going,,It is a new year you know,, lets make it a good one haha,,

so I have a spot in my shop that I can set it up safely and with enough room that it wont get in the way of anything,


I am going to build a sturdy stand for it but wasnt sure of optimum sixe for it, the lathe is a pretty big one, I think it is like 3 feet [+] long,, I am over 6 foot and the boys are tall as well, the older one is 6’ and the younger is 5.3’,,

any suggestions would be appreciated, thansk pat


9 replies so far

View hairy's profile

hairy

1988 posts in 2137 days


#1 posted 1672 days ago

Elbow height is where to start. Make adjustments from that to be comfortable. You want to be standing upright,and your arms close to 90 degrees at the elbow.

You could make it high for you, and build a level platform that you could put in place the kids.

-- the last of Barret's Privateers...

View LesB's profile

LesB

1060 posts in 2047 days


#2 posted 1671 days ago

Hairy is correct.
It would be uncomfortable to work on a lathe bending down or having your arms to low. In addition you are most stable working with your arms bent around 90 degrees so you can hold them against you torso when the work calls for “extra” stability. I often move my whole body (not my feet) as the tool goes back and forth across the tool rest. I consider it almost dangerous to work with your arms too high.
The smaller som may need a raised platform to stand on if you build the base to fit you and the taller son.

-- Les B, Oregon

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14620 posts in 2280 days


#3 posted 1671 days ago

You guys mean the center line of the work at elbow height?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View LesB's profile

LesB

1060 posts in 2047 days


#4 posted 1671 days ago

Topamax,
We can’t think of everything when writing an explanation for things. Glad you caught that point.

-- Les B, Oregon

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TopamaxSurvivor

14620 posts in 2280 days


#5 posted 1671 days ago

That was a question :-))

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View tamboti's profile

tamboti

207 posts in 1746 days


#6 posted 1671 days ago

Hi They are all correct about the hight to start from but there is one thing all the book writers and pros forget
and that is not all peoples arms are the same. if when u buy a jacket and u buy one marked long and if fits perfect the arm lenght then increase hight of the lathe center if jacket is regular lathe center at elbow hight.
hope it makes sense
Regards Roger in SA

-- Africa is not for sissies

View hairy's profile

hairy

1988 posts in 2137 days


#7 posted 1671 days ago

Yes, I did mean center line of the work. I apologize for leaving that out.

-- the last of Barret's Privateers...

View maples's profile

maples

63 posts in 1673 days


#8 posted 1671 days ago

thanks guys, I actually was just saying that we will probably have to make a platform for the younger son to stand on and raise him to the lathe, , I appreciate the help with height, I will more than likely have more questions on lathe work, as the last time I used one was in high school.. that was quite a while ago,,

so I told my younger son jesse, 13,, that we will get a book from the library, he will read it and have to teach dear ole dad how to use it, he got a kick out of it.. he was /is very interested in getting this going we were in the shop yesterday moving stuff around and cleaning up to get it set up, I will keep you informed, thanks pat

View jeffthewoodwacker's profile

jeffthewoodwacker

603 posts in 2408 days


#9 posted 1671 days ago

Rule of thumb for lathe height is that if you hold your arms at your sides and bend your arm from the elbow 90 degrees your hand should be level with the center of the spindle. Easy way to determine this is to put your tool rest up to the spindle at center height. Your bent arm should be able to rest on the tool rest and be parallel to the bed ways. Would not make a difference how tall, or short you are or length of your arms – if you use the above method your lathe will be at a comfortable height. For young people build a solid riser platform – I recently visited someones shop and they had their son standing on a drywall bucket – not safe!

-- Those that say it can't be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

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