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Forum topic by kenthemadcarpenter posted 11-28-2015 12:09 AM 861 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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kenthemadcarpenter

122 posts in 528 days


11-28-2015 12:09 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question resource tip trick chisel carving tool

I’m looking to hone my skills, I honestly would like to move away from using power tools on some project. Can any one recommend a decent set of chisels for doing dado’s and rabbets with out breaking the bank (and please don’t tell me Stanley or craftsman)


19 replies so far

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5764 posts in 947 days


#1 posted 11-28-2015 12:21 AM

Narex. Vintage Stanley’s.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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Johnny7

208 posts in 551 days


#2 posted 11-28-2015 05:12 AM

^ I don’t think it’s possible to improve on Fridge’s answer.

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ElChe

630 posts in 797 days


#3 posted 11-28-2015 05:32 AM

Old stock Marples the blue ones with a white detail but not vouching for the new Irwin Marples as I have not used them. New I would second Narex.

-- Tom - Measure twice cut once. Then measure again. Curse. Fudge.

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

14550 posts in 2144 days


#4 posted 11-28-2015 05:45 AM

IF you can still find an Aldis that has them, there WAS a 4 pc set. Paul Sellers is very pleased with them. I’ve been using one of those sets, as well.

Rest of mine are a bit on the old side….

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2324 posts in 1758 days


#5 posted 11-28-2015 01:23 PM

Craftsman’s from the 60s and 70s are supposed to be Buck Brothers, I beileve. DON’T buy the Buck Bros set Home Depot sells – it’s awful.

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bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2528 days


#6 posted 11-28-2015 01:30 PM

To be honest, I had a set if irwins I used for years. They required a ton of work to get to a point of use but after that just regular good sharpening and stropping, and they were fine. I upgraded to a set of Lie-Nielsens and are in a diff world now, but the irwiins got me by.

I’ll say this, learning to sharpen properly will overcome a lot. In the beginning I did not know how and it hurt.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

13713 posts in 2079 days


#7 posted 11-28-2015 01:47 PM

Stanley or Craftsman.

Actually, if you find a set of SW reissues from Stanley, they are good tools for not-a-lot of money. And I consistently hear people on LJs rave about the Narex as being good chisels for the money (as said above). That said, rabbets with chisels is a pretty tough way to get started in handtool woodworking. For that, I’d suggest a #78 rabbeting plane, or a #45. First one is roughly $50, second one about $125 on the used markets. But those are way off topic from your OP, so I’ll stop there.

Let us know what you decide for a chisel purchase, good luck!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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bondogaposis

4024 posts in 1812 days


#8 posted 11-28-2015 02:25 PM

It would be difficult to make rabbets and dados w/ just a chisel, generally a rabbet plane and plow plane are used for those. The recommendations that others have made for chisels are excellent.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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bearkatwood

1195 posts in 473 days


#9 posted 11-28-2015 02:26 PM

There is nothing wrong with a new set of stanleys. I have been looking at buying a set of 750 socket chisels. They have received many good reviews form Chris Schwarz and many others. I use the stanley bench chisels now and I have been very happy with them for the last three years. Lie-Nielsen makes great chisels, but they are pricey. I use LN mortise chisels and they are worth the money. They soak them in liquid nitrogen to cure them. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V8u9duVNxdo

-- Brian Noel

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Logan Windram

303 posts in 1923 days


#10 posted 11-28-2015 03:39 PM



To be honest, I had a set if irwins I used for years. They required a ton of work to get to a point of use but after that just regular good sharpening and stropping, and they were fine. I upgraded to a set of Lie-Nielsens and are in a diff world now, but the irwiins got me by.

I ll say this, learning to sharpen properly will overcome a lot. In the beginning I did not know how and it hurt.

- bonesbr549

It’s funny Bones, do you feel like LN chisels elevated you too super craftsman? Lol…. I started out with a set of Buck Bros and Stanley Fat Max and while they required a lot of time worth of flattening, once the bevel was razor edged the tool could only take me as far as my practice and mastery of technique. Now I love my LN Bevel chisels, but I’d contest that they did anything different that the less expensive chisels did in my hand… And in no way is that to discourage someone from getting LN chisels, they’re exceptional in length and feel and steel quality.

For planes, the cheap one are just too much work to get up to speed, the machining is often very poor, and your hands and mind will want to do something, and that tool will leave you flat and deflated. I love my LN planes, I have the LA Block, the 62 with addionnal blades, and the 7. For 600 you get tools that are heirloom quality. Veritas probably saves you 200 on those. Point being, buy well. If you know what to look for in vintage and used, by all means.

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

14550 posts in 2144 days


#11 posted 11-28-2015 04:53 PM

Just can’t see why I should spend all that cash on a simple chisel, in fact, it cost more than I’ve ever spent to get a decent set.

Some are Aldis, some are very old Witherbys and the like. The mortise chisels I USE are by Butcher, or New Haven Edge Tools. Other than the 4 pc Aldis, the rest were finds at yard sales, and Antique stores. Not did take that much work to get them to do their jobs.

Planes? Have yet to figure out any difference….but I seem to like the older ones better..

Whether it is these iron bodied planes by Stanley and Millers falls ( these were THE Premium Planes in their day)or

The wood bodied ones. Does NOT take all that much elbow grease to get them to work. maybe an hour or two..tops. Of course, the “Elbow grease” part may be beyond some of the other poster’s skill set, when all they have to do is open a box.

For rebates/rabbets:

Stanley made for Wards #78
For dados:

Stanley #39..3/8” wide dado.
They are out there…..just have to look around. Maybe it is not how much one spends on a tool that counts, but how you use a tool does?

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View alittleoff's profile

alittleoff

296 posts in 737 days


#12 posted 11-28-2015 05:16 PM

I don’t make box joints or use chisels that much, but I bought a set of Dewalt from HD that were razor sharp and almost dead flat. I’ve not heard much about them on this site but mine were well worth the money. Also Amazon has a set of Narex for 40.00 I believe. I would buy in a minute if I needed chisels. Its just my 2 cents worth that don’t mean a lot. Like I said I don’t use them a lot.
Gerald

View OldGuysRule's profile

OldGuysRule

130 posts in 434 days


#13 posted 12-10-2015 09:32 AM

I purchased a really cheap set of Stanley chisels, you know the ones with the plastic handles, many, many years ago. It took awhile but, once I had a good edge on them they worked great! I now have some really nice high dollar chisels I picked up at a really good price at a flea market, the brand they are is not important. It took awhile to get a good cutting edge on them also but, they are very sharp now. I thought that now that I had a really good set of chisels my work would be so much easier and with better results.

The sad part is that the cheap Stanley’s are still my go to chisels! My feeling is that if maintained correctly and with practice any chisel will do the job. It’s more the user then the tool! I remember watching my grandfather sharpen his chisels and then listening to him explain how to use them while he worked with them. And he explained that the skill was in the hands of the user not the tool! He had a mismatched set of chisels, most were fairly cheap ones but, he did some really fine work with them.

I’ve also got a really cheap set from HF. I use them for really rough stuff. But, damned if they aren’t holding up and keeping a fairly nice cutting edge. Even after some pretty hard abuse just a few minutes with a stone and they are back to fine cutting shape.

-- Rod P.........OLD GUY......Learning new things!

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dhazelton

2324 posts in 1758 days


#14 posted 12-10-2015 01:40 PM

Record 778. I picked one up at a yard sale new in box for $50.

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waho6o9

7171 posts in 2038 days


#15 posted 12-10-2015 01:53 PM


http://www.ebay.com/itm/8-PC-JAPANESE-WOOD-WORKING-CHISEL-WOODWORKING-TOOL-SET-/291615855124?hash=item43e5a8d214:m:mJaSYaPAgBT8JJLVplCZ2VA

Great balance, easy to sharpen and great edge retention makes the above set a value purchase IMHO.

My set was purchased @ 100.00 several years back and I’m pleased with the performance of
the set.

showing 1 through 15 of 19 replies

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