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Forum topic by 1voyager1 posted 11-27-2015 09:46 PM 921 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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1voyager1

74 posts in 895 days


11-27-2015 09:46 PM

I am about to begin making and installing a cabinet and some shelving in our garage.

My major concern is the cabinet.

Overall dims. = 80” X 48”
52” off the floor on 100” high wall

I am planning on making it from 3/4” sanded PW except for the back and sliding doors [1/4” sanded PW] and the top and RH side pieces [1/2” sanded PW].

The reason I’ve chosen 1/2” material for the top and RH side pieces is to cut weight to be handled while hanging it. And, it may cut material cost also.
Are there any good reasons to NOT use a thinner 1/2” material for these two pieces?

-- Every mighty oak is nothing more than a nut that has stood it's ground.


13 replies so far

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2853 posts in 2694 days


#1 posted 11-28-2015 12:52 AM

I built mine with 3/4 inch plywood and never gave it a second thought.

http://lumberjocks.com/MT_Stringer/blog/series/6453

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1772 days


#2 posted 11-28-2015 02:31 AM

I’d build that in 3 pieces. Easier to install and build. Does take more plywood but it would be worth it.

I’d use 3/4 for all parts including the back. Left over 3/4 plywood is usually more useful that 1/4 or 1/2

I’d probably use melamine to avoid the cost and hassle of finishing. If you’re one of those who thinks Melamie is junk you’re wrong and I wasting my breath. The saving would pay for the extra cost of building 3 units instead of one.

Your plan is going to leave you with 3 different thickness of sheet goods left over.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

3675 posts in 1729 days


#3 posted 11-28-2015 04:47 AM

I built my cabinets out of a single piece of 3/4 plywood, 48×32x16 with a center divider and a fixed shelf. I drilled holes for shelf pins on the other side. They are hung with a French cleat. I’ve since put on doors with plexi glass.
Using a single sheet I don’t have all those annoying oddball pieces of left over plywood. I’ve also added a couple of extra shelves on the pin side from other left over projects.

View Daruc's profile

Daruc

459 posts in 596 days


#4 posted 11-28-2015 03:44 PM

”Are there any good reasons to NOT use a thinner 1/2” material for these two pieces?”

By my rough calcs. your only saving approx. 8 lbs.

-- -

View clin's profile

clin

513 posts in 459 days


#5 posted 11-28-2015 05:00 PM

I’d also go with 3 separate units. But if it had to be one single unit, I’d still build with 3/4” and just get help in mounting it. Even then, screw a cleat on the wall to support the lower edge while mounting it.

Nothing wrong with a 1/4” back given that the whole size is 80” x 48” and therefore almost a whole sheet to begin with. So not much 1/4’ scrap left over. I agree that the 1/2” material is an added complication without much real benefit.

Also, looking at the design, you could build the two end cabinets and hang them. Then build the middle shelving unit in place, using the other two cabinets as it’s sides. That save a bit of extra material similar to having built it as a single unit.

I’m currently building some shop cabinets. I’m going with 3/4” pre-finished birch ply for sides, top/bottom and back. A bit heavier with the 3/4” back, but I didn’t want to cut rabbets for the back. And since the pre-finished and/or laminated products don’t glue well, I didn’t want to rely on the back being essentially held in with just staples or brads. The 3/4” back allows me to inset it completely and then screw it in place.

-- Clin

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1voyager1

74 posts in 895 days


#6 posted 11-28-2015 07:30 PM

Thanks guys.
I will go with 3/4” instead of 1/2” for the top and RH side. After making the material spec change, I see a much more efficient use of the PW sheets, fewer small throwaway pieces. I should have looked at that to begin with.

I am considering using birch [1/4” & 3/4”] or red oak [3/4” only] PW. they’ll only run another $30 to $40 more for the 5 sheets needed. Plus, they’ll give me better options for finishing the cabinet.

I’m probably going to go with the single unit rather than breaking it up into smaller sections.
While the dwgs show double sliding doors on each end, there will actually only be a single door at each location that will slide to the middle covering the center section when accessing the end units.

Metal or plastic tracks for the doors look to be not an option, nothing suitable is available locally, and cost and availability of ordering them has too many problems. I’ll need to run a single dado across the length of the top and bottom pieces for the doors to slide in. Swing out doors are not an option. Doors on at least the end units are mandatory.

I intend to rabbet the back into the edge pieces, gluing and nailing it into place.
Shelving will be adjustable.

-- Every mighty oak is nothing more than a nut that has stood it's ground.

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1voyager1

74 posts in 895 days


#7 posted 11-30-2015 11:24 PM

OK.
I went to town yesterday and bought my birch PW for this project, 3ea 3/4” & 2ea 1/4” – 4’X8’ers.
It’s been a long time since I’ve spent a lot of time manhandling 4’ X 8’ sheets.
One thing has been driven home, I’m no longer a 20-something, or a 30-something, or a 40-something, or a 50-something, not even a 60-something anymore.
I no longer have the strength or energy I think of myself as having, rude awakening!
With the trouble I’m having manhandling a 3/4” sheet now, I certainly will not be able to lift that full cabinet to where I want it to go, not even with an assist from M’Lady.
I’d have to go hire 3 or 4 20-something day laborers to get it done now, not gonna happen.

I’m now thinking of a 2 cabinet option with the center section added in with the top and bottom pieces lap jointed to the end sections with the center section shelving fixed mounted in dado slots.
It should end up looking the same when completed except for the center shelving not being adjustable.
If I’m careful I should still be able to run a single dado door track across the 3 bottom and 3 top pieces, and have it work smoothly.

Beginning to think about how I’m gonna finish this monster.
I’ll go over to the Finishing Forum to get my questions about that asked.

@ AlaskaGuy
I am prejudiced against melamine. I think of it as being a particle board,whether rightly or wrongly.
Particle board type materials are noted for not holding up or performing well in the humidity here on the windward side of Big Island.
Plus, It is even heavier than PW.

-- Every mighty oak is nothing more than a nut that has stood it's ground.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2193 posts in 944 days


#8 posted 12-01-2015 01:09 PM

I agree on the 2 cab option.

I would consider 2 – 24” cabs shelf spanning between.
The shelf can be adjustable just drill some pin holes before you mount.

1/4” ply for the backs will reduce weight dramatically.
Put a cleat on the wall and its snap (ha!).

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1772 days


#9 posted 12-01-2015 09:01 PM

@ AlaskaGuy
I am prejudiced against melamine. I think of it as being a particle board,whether rightly or wrongly.
Particle board type materials are noted for not holding up or performing well in the humidity here on the windward side of Big Island.
Plus, It is even heavier than PW.

I have no argument with those who don’t understand how to use, or the advantages of certain products. I alway say each to there own. Melamine is use all over the world, in hospitals, commercial building, schools, most all commercial frame less cabinet are made of Melamine and in all climates.

My shop cabinets are Melamie I put in 20 years ago.

Happy painting.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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1voyager1

74 posts in 895 days


#10 posted 12-02-2015 07:06 AM

@ AlaskaGuy
I understand what you’re saying. Melamine is seen almost everywhere, probably more often used in cabinets than wood.
I used melamine in the outfeed table for my table saw making it almost too heavy for the saw.
I wish I had gone with 3/4” PW in that outfeed table instead.
I do not want to deal with that kind weight in the cabinets.
As you said, to each their own.

I spent almost 35 years in Alaska before moving to Hawai’i.
I miss the cooler summer weather.
—————————-

OK, the plan is almost final.
Only a little more tweaking left to do.

I am definitely going with a 3 cabinet design.

The doors are double sliding giving an opening of just over 12” on each side when opened on each of the cabinets.
Anything too big to fit will go onto the shelving that will be going in below the cabinets.
I begin cutting tomorrow morning.
It will be a slow methodical build.

I’m still not sure of exactly how I’ll be dealing with edging, adjustable shelving, dowels or biscuits for the joints, cutting the door tracks, etc.
Those things can be figured out as I go.
Plus, this still fits onto the same 2 sheets of 1/4”, and 3 sheets off 3/4” as the original idea.
Although, there are less leftovers.

-- Every mighty oak is nothing more than a nut that has stood it's ground.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2193 posts in 944 days


#11 posted 12-02-2015 12:37 PM

Not meaning to add confusion, but my ears pricked a bit when you said sliding doors.

Are the doors going to be clear?

I built some cabs for my shop years ago with sliding doors. They were a PITA and I ended up taking them out.
Got sick of sliding them back and forth..back and forth when looking for something.

I’m sure you’ve thought it thru, but this might head something off for you.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1772 days


#12 posted 12-02-2015 06:56 PM


Not meaning to add confusion, but my ears pricked a bit when you said sliding doors.

Are the doors going to be clear?

I built some cabs for my shop years ago with sliding doors. They were a PITA and I ended up taking them out.
Got sick of sliding them back and forth..back and forth when looking for something.

I m sure you ve thought it thru, but this might head something off for you.

- rwe2156


+1 and the groves get dirty and sticky and full of dust.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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1voyager1

74 posts in 895 days


#13 posted 12-02-2015 11:15 PM

I had thought about the narrow openings through the sliding doors.
I didn’t like that, but thought I could live with it.
The thought of the grooves filling up with the various odds and ends that would accumulate made me shudder.
The idea of a 2’ wide open door in the garage, let alone 3 of them, turned me off to the idea of a hinged swinging door.
So, I went back to the drawing board and had a flash of inspiration – a double hinged door on each cabinet.
There would be 6 of them, but they would only be about 1’ wide.
I can live with that.
In fact, I like it.
M’Lady will like it much better also.
I will need to pick up some 1×3 birch for the frames on the doors as well as the hardware they’ll need.

-- Every mighty oak is nothing more than a nut that has stood it's ground.

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