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Shellacing end grain.

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Forum topic by Dogfisher posted 11-26-2015 05:00 PM 583 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Dogfisher

11 posts in 376 days


11-26-2015 05:00 PM

Topic tags/keywords: rustic arts and crafts finishing miter saw question

I have a end table project that incorporates 3/8” discs cut from downed limbs of various species and size. I’ve arranged them on a plywood tabletop and plan on grouting in between them. I’ve shellaced them about 8 times but they keep drying with shiny parts and dull parts. I’m assuming that they’ll eventually stop absorbing but I’m concerned about the too coats not having a smooth finish. I sand down the high points in between coats. Any advice for applications would be greatly appreciated!
https://s3.amazonaws.com/vs-lumberjocks.com/nyegr51.jpg!

-- RMiller, New Jersey, http://inflatus1.wix.com/rsmiller


9 replies so far

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Andre

1022 posts in 1269 days


#1 posted 11-26-2015 05:06 PM

I have found that sanding and Shellac don’t work all that great, I usually plane end grain smooth and Shellac goes on much better.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

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Dogfisher

11 posts in 376 days


#2 posted 11-26-2015 06:05 PM

I’m meant “top coats” in my first post. Planing is not an option for me.

-- RMiller, New Jersey, http://inflatus1.wix.com/rsmiller

View michelletwo's profile

michelletwo

2594 posts in 2479 days


#3 posted 11-26-2015 06:18 PM

iF I understand correctly, then andre is correct..you are trying to shellac end grain discs. Are they all dry as a bone? Is there a big difference between the heartwood and sapwood? Between the different species? Shellac would have trouble with these differences in the wood.

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Dogfisher

11 posts in 376 days


#4 posted 11-26-2015 06:49 PM

They were pretty dry when I started. They dry spots are erratic. Not restricted to heart wood. I’m just trying to figure out if there is a trick to getting the top coat smooth. There should be a point when the discs stop absorbing. Then hopefully the coats will be more even drying.

-- RMiller, New Jersey, http://inflatus1.wix.com/rsmiller

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John Stegall

478 posts in 2979 days


#5 posted 11-26-2015 06:57 PM

I read that you can do a sand with a very fine grit (400) and this was supposed to reduce the absorption. The purpose of this was to finish a table top so that the face grain and end grain would look the same. It might help.

-- jstegall

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gfadvm

14940 posts in 2153 days


#6 posted 11-27-2015 01:28 AM

I finished some old growth redwood end grain that I had the same issues with: the early wood and late wood absorb finish at different rates (my redwood was like shellacking a sponge). I just kept applying more shellac, sanding lightly with 320 grit, and it eventually came out very even.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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Dogfisher

11 posts in 376 days


#7 posted 11-27-2015 02:57 AM

Awesome. That’s what I wanted to hear.

-- RMiller, New Jersey, http://inflatus1.wix.com/rsmiller

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gfadvm

14940 posts in 2153 days


#8 posted 11-27-2015 03:23 AM

Click for details

This is one of 2 redwood bandsaw boxes I finished with shellac.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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Dogfisher

11 posts in 376 days


#9 posted 11-27-2015 05:10 AM

Nice work.

-- RMiller, New Jersey, http://inflatus1.wix.com/rsmiller

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