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Table saw blades: forrest, freud, ridge carbide?

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Forum topic by ben posted 10-30-2007 05:14 AM 6431 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ben

158 posts in 3957 days


10-30-2007 05:14 AM

After doing more burning than I would like, I am doing 2 things: getting a splitter that I can use when the blade guard is off, and getting a second blade (still using the bosch blade that came with my 4000). Anybody have any thoughts on particular blades? Seems like everybody raves about the WW2, and I’ve caught a few people who like the ridge carbide TS2000.

Also, I will be doing a fair bit of ripping of long 2-by’s… Any suggestions for a cheap/durable blade to match?

Thanks.

-ben


10 replies so far

View coloradoclimber's profile

coloradoclimber

548 posts in 4154 days


#1 posted 10-30-2007 05:38 AM

Ben,

For the ripping, do you want a glue ready face or are you just wanting to split some 2×4s to use in framing or as preliminary stock? I tend to swap between blades and I have my “good” blades, including ripping blades, and my “good enough” blades.

For ripping 2 bys, pressure treated, junky ply, composite board, etc, I have a couple old 28 and 40 tooth Vermont America blades or I use a worm drive circular saw. I keep the blades clean, feed at a reasonable rate, and I don’t worry about ruining a $50 – $100+ blade. I’ve been very happy with this combination but both options leave a face that is far from ready for glue-up.

For cleaner cuts I use either freud or forrest. Both the Freud and Forrest work well, clean, pretty much glue ready faces. I’ve not used the ridge carbide but have read good reviews.

For my junkier blades, blades that are going to be fed a wide variety of god knows what, I use standard kerf. For my “good” blades I’ve been going pretty much exclusively with thin kerf blades and have been happy.

View SilverFoxArt's profile

SilverFoxArt

39 posts in 3968 days


#2 posted 10-30-2007 10:04 AM

Ben, for your finish cuts, “Ready to glue” what tooth count do you use?

-- Mel, Utah, SilverFoxArt.com

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ben

158 posts in 3957 days


#3 posted 10-30-2007 02:06 PM

ebanista: unfortunately, there is little that I can do about raw power right now. A cabinet saw is not in my near future, space or money wise…

colo/SFA: I only have the original bosch blade ATM, and it’s a 40-count. Are ripping blades generally not going to give me a glue ready finish? Or is this mainly the difference between the cheap and the not-so-cheap blades, such that buying a freud ripping blade might make sense?

The ripping that I’m doing is to SPF 2-by’s which will be glued up and used in a platform bed frame… it’s not clear whether it’s worth buying a rip blade just for this, but I thought it was worth asking the question. At a minimum, I will buy at least one good combination blade by the end of this week.

Also, I have read that thin kerf blades are better for contractor saws (due to the power issues)... What are the disadvantages to thin kerf?

View Thos. Angle's profile

Thos. Angle

4444 posts in 4049 days


#4 posted 10-30-2007 02:23 PM

I use a Freud Glueline Rip and switch to a Freud Melamine to rip sheet goods. It works real well. The Freud blades have worked pretty well for me and now work better since I switched to link belts on my Jet table saw. I ruined a couple blades because of stretched out belts. The burning and problems have now been eliminated. The link belts will help your contractor saw as well. I think my next set of blades will be Forrest. I want to see if twice the price is twice as good. Lee Jesberger swears by Forrest. Freud makes a rip blade that is not too expensive for ripping 2 by material.

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

View dalec's profile

dalec

612 posts in 3975 days


#5 posted 10-30-2007 05:36 PM

Hi Ben,

I also have a Bosch 4000. Mine was purchased used and needed to go to the factory service center for work. I have it back and am in the process of researching saw blades. I have received several responses to my forum topic on full or thin kerf.

If my table saw had more hp, I would go for the full kerf. However from all I have read, I am coming to the conclusion that thin kerf would work best for me on the Bosch 4000, because of the thin kerf places less stress on the motor. I interpret this to mean the thin kerf increases the cutting power of the Bosch over a full kerf mounted blade. Not more torque, but more efficient use of that torque. I may be all wet on this. Correct me if I am off on this.

Freud, Forrest and Ridge from all my reading are very good to excellent.

Best of luck on your decision.

Dalec

View coloradoclimber's profile

coloradoclimber

548 posts in 4154 days


#6 posted 10-30-2007 05:55 PM

Ben,

In general yes, a ripping blade, lower tooth count, is going to give a rougher surface than a higher tooth count blade. The exception to this is when you overfeed a higher tooth count blade and end up with chatter or burning.

As for being glue ready it depends on your definition of glue ready. If you want a rub ready gluing surface my experience is that the Forrest WWII ripping 5/4 hardwood will give a rub ready face, smooth as a babies butt. I tend to use the forrest more than the freud so I don’t have a real strong opinion of freud other than to say that every time I’ve used the freud blades I’ve been happy. No negative thoughts on my part generally means it’s a pretty good blade. My opinion is that either blade, freud or forrest, sharp and clean, will give a face that is ready for glue up.

My junk blades no longer, probably never did, produce what I consider a glue ready face.

I’m an advocate for matching the blade to the job. That means a stack of blades and swapping them as needed. There is a different view that says that’s what combination blade are for, one blade to do all things.

As for thin vs thick kerf blades I’ve been using mostly thin kerf blades these days, in a 3 hp cabinet saw, and I’ve been happy. I know there is a group that says thin kerf is a gimmick, that you should only use standard kerf. I’ve not had any problems with thin kerf so far. I’m more of a mind, why use a chain saw if you can get the results you want with a scalpel.

View ben's profile

ben

158 posts in 3957 days


#7 posted 10-31-2007 02:01 PM

Thanks for all the info. I went ahead and bought 2 thin kerf freuds—the 24 tooth rip blade, and the 50 tooth combination, and will be putting the freud plywood and forrest WWII on my list as my next blades. Also will be cleaning the bosch blade with some simple green and light elbow grease, to see how that improves cutting (suggested from another thread). Thanks!

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edp

109 posts in 4047 days


#8 posted 11-01-2007 12:44 AM

I had been using the Oldham “Signature blades. 16” on the beam saw and 10” on the table saw and really liked their performance, especially at the cost. After hearing so much hoopla over the Forrest WWII, I got on for the table saw. I have to say that I don’t see any difference in performance.

Ed

-- Come on in, the beer is cold and the wood is dry. www.crookedlittletree.com

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edp

109 posts in 4047 days


#9 posted 11-01-2007 02:37 AM

Hey Ben, that burning you are referring to may not be associated with the blade at all. I’d more likely suspect a misalignment of the fence to the blade. I’m sure that there are several schools of thought on this, but on my saw, the fence is set a little wider on the back side of the blade than the front side. This guarantees that when you are ripping, the material between the blade and the fence will not rub against the back side of the blade, causing…..............you guessed it…............burning. Try adjusting your fence and see if that doesn’t correct your problem.

Ed

-- Come on in, the beer is cold and the wood is dry. www.crookedlittletree.com

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ben

158 posts in 3957 days


#10 posted 11-01-2007 03:40 AM

edp: I read about the fence issue as well, and plan to check my alignment shortly. I also just finished cleaning my existing blade, so hopefully these 2 might take care of things.

ebanista: thanks for the heads up. I ordered via the LJ/amazon store, so I appear to have gotten lucky, and bought the industrial blades.

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