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Forum topic by abehil posted 11-24-2015 10:56 PM 1034 views 0 times favorited 27 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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abehil

104 posts in 804 days


11-24-2015 10:56 PM

Topic tags/keywords: table saw band saw question

This is about the most expensive setup I could possibly afford and won’t be able to buy anything more for it so it would have to do all I need.

Here is the link: http://seattle.craigslist.org/sno/tls/5329759865.html

I want to be able to resaw 4×4 into 5/8” slices. I have an old grizzly TS that is on life support and a 12” bandsaw. I’ve been contemplating whether it’s better to get a bigger bandsaw that can handle resawing or look for a TS that will be able to do that instead. Any TS I buy has to have riving knife and I want it to handle dust control pretty well. I expect that a BS could produce less dust so that pushes me in that direction.

Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated.


27 replies so far

View conifur's profile

conifur

955 posts in 617 days


#1 posted 11-24-2015 11:09 PM

I dont think you can get enough blade height to resaw 4×4, plus I think would be a bit under powered, I go with a band saw for resawing.
BS is one of the duster machines, even with collection.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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joey502

487 posts in 983 days


#2 posted 11-24-2015 11:13 PM

The cut depth on a typical TS is just a dash over 3” maybe 3.25 on some. You will not be able to make that cut in one pass with that saw.

What are the 5/8” slices being used for? A little more info may help people give you better advise on which way to go.

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Tedstor

1625 posts in 2098 days


#3 posted 11-24-2015 11:14 PM

That Incra fence make that a pretty nice deal (the fence, by itself, sells for $500 new), but as mentioned…...you aren’t going to resaw 4×4s on it.
If resawing is the genesis of this purchase…...then you should be looking at bandsaws.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4233 posts in 1664 days


#4 posted 11-24-2015 11:17 PM

Max depth of cut is 3-1/8”, so you could re-saw, but would have to do it in two passes and then clean it up with whatever means you have (hand plane, jointer, planer, etc…). Depending on the size (length) of your 4×4’s, a band saw would probably be a better option.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View abehil's profile

abehil

104 posts in 804 days


#5 posted 11-24-2015 11:17 PM



I dont think you can get enough blade height to resaw 4×4, plus I think would be a bit under powered, I go with a band saw for resawing.
BS is one of the duster machines, even with collection.
- conifur

Since I am going to need a TS soon, I wouldn’t want to blow all my $$ on a BS so would this grizzly BS be able to handle that much resaw without having to stand there all day pushing on the lumber?
http://www.grizzly.com/products/The-Ultimate-14-Bandsaw/G0555

View joey502's profile

joey502

487 posts in 983 days


#6 posted 11-24-2015 11:25 PM

I dont think you can get enough blade height to resaw 4×4, plus I think would be a bit under powered, I go with a band saw for resawing.
BS is one of the duster machines, even with collection.
- conifur

Since I am going to need a TS soon, I wouldn t want to blow all my $$ on a BS so would this grizzly BS be able to handle that much resaw without having to stand there all day pushing on the lumber?
http://www.grizzly.com/products/The-Ultimate-14-Bandsaw/G0555

- abehil

With the right blade that BS will resaw 4” without a problem. I resaw wider boards with a 12” Craftsman all of the time.

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abehil

104 posts in 804 days


#7 posted 11-24-2015 11:31 PM


What are the 5/8” slices being used for? A little more info may help people give you better advise on which way to go.

- joey502

I want to cut the 4×4 into a few different thicknesses for patio furniture. I’ll be using 1/2”, 5/8” and 3/4”. Mainly the wood will be cedar, both Alaska yellow cedar and incense cedar. Various lengths ranging mostly 14” to 24”. Any boards used for the tops will come from the 3.5” slices.

Currently I built a sled to use for resawing and I have to make 3 to 4 passes raising the blade and then flip it over for the final cut. It works but is a slow process, it’s dusty mainly because the on the final pass the dust shoots up between the gap instead of getting sucked down.

My limited BS experience (12” is all I have) means I don’t know exactly how beefy a BS needs to be to resaw dozens of pieces or whether it will be faster than making the multiple passes on the TS. I wish there was some sort of “estimated inches per minute” type information.

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conifur

955 posts in 617 days


#8 posted 11-24-2015 11:39 PM

As far a resawing on a BS the blade and FPS is more important then HP, a good 3TPI hook tooth blade is what is needed. With not complete cuts on the TS and cedar is a very lung and skin irritable wood, the BS is your better bet. You can get a decent used one depending on your local for 150-300$ on CL

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

View joey502's profile

joey502

487 posts in 983 days


#9 posted 11-25-2015 12:51 AM


What are the 5/8” slices being used for? A little more info may help people give you better advise on which way to go.

- joey502

I want to cut the 4×4 into a few different thicknesses for patio furniture. I ll be using 1/2”, 5/8” and 3/4”. Mainly the wood will be cedar, both Alaska yellow cedar and incense cedar. Various lengths ranging mostly 14” to 24”. Any boards used for the tops will come from the 3.5” slices.

Currently I built a sled to use for resawing and I have to make 3 to 4 passes raising the blade and then flip it over for the final cut. It works but is a slow process, it s dusty mainly because the on the final pass the dust shoots up between the gap instead of getting sucked down.

My limited BS experience (12” is all I have) means I don t know exactly how beefy a BS needs to be to resaw dozens of pieces or whether it will be faster than making the multiple passes on the TS. I wish there was some sort of “estimated inches per minute” type information.

- abehil

Like Conifer said the blade is more important. That saw with a good resaw blade will chew though cedar with little effort.

Based on the projects you plan to build I would vote for the bandsaw. In my opinion the BS is a safer and more efficient way to resaw the lumber.

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joey502

487 posts in 983 days


#10 posted 11-25-2015 01:01 AM

Something else just occurred to me. What type of 12” BS do you have now? Is it in good working order?

I would think you could make those cuts with the saw you already have.

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abehil

104 posts in 804 days


#11 posted 11-25-2015 01:36 AM


Something else just occurred to me. What type of 12” BS do you have now? Is it in good working order?
I would think you could make those cuts with the saw you already have.
- joey502

It’s a craftsman 12”. Those are 1/2 horse and trying to resaw anything over 2” falls into two categories: annoying and excruciating depending on thickness. I’ve tried resawing a 4×4 only once. It was pointless.

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abehil

104 posts in 804 days


#12 posted 11-25-2015 01:40 AM


You can get a decent used one depending on your local for 150-300$ on CL
- conifur

I have seen only one (1) bandsaw at $150 over the last 3 months and it lasted 1 day. I am not near enough to run over to get one so that puts me at a disadvantage in hoping to find one priced like that. In the greater Seattle area tools must be coated with some type of precious metal because they are NEVER as cheap on CL as folks here at Lumberjocks claim to see on CL.
Any BS below $400 will be a 3/4 horse model. No matter how old the BS is, if it’s a Delta it seems like the sellers are parting with a member of their famiily. I’m not joking.

The only ones I’ve seen in the $250 range are A) used Harbor freight model, B) Ridgid BS1400, C) various incarnations of Formost, OAU, Sterling … And the one Ridgid is actually $275 so at the top end of the sub $300 range.

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runswithscissors

2189 posts in 1490 days


#13 posted 11-25-2015 01:49 AM

I know of only one 10” TS that can handle a 4×4 (3.5×3.5) in one pass, and that is the Ryobi BT 3000/3100. They are discontinued, but used ones pop up on CL for $150 to $250 from time to time. The 3100 is the better saw, because it has a 15 amp motor rather than 13 amp.

I know Ryobi is disdained by most LJs, but I had one, and it really is a pretty good saw for a jobsite tool. There is even a users group that has a website.

But if you were having to do a lot of ripping of 4×4s, I would be concerned about the durability of the universal motor (as I would be with any universal motor). They use a cogged belt for the drive. I think Ryobi still distributes parts for their older tools, though I haven’t tried googling them for a while.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4233 posts in 1664 days


#14 posted 11-25-2015 01:59 AM


I have seen only one (1) bandsaw at $150 over the last 3 months and it lasted 1 day.

And no telling how many came and went without you even seeing them :)
As you noticed, the good deals don’t hang around for long.

The key is to know what you want, and at what price you are willing to pay. Set up some CL alerts, and when the deal comes along, pounce fast… don’t send a question to the seller asking about some particular aspect of the machine, or post online asking if it’s a good deal. As otherwise, OWWM rule #5 will bite you almost every time.

And as for power… if you read the manual for the original Delta BS (which is what pretty much every imported cast iron clone is patterned after), it says a 1/3 HP motor is sufficient for most use, and a 1/2 HP motor should be used for production work or when using a riser with heavy or thick stock. The most important factor is to have a properly setup saw and use the proper blade… adding horsepower to overcome those deficiencies is not the solution.

It sounds like your BS needs some tweaking, as you should be able to resaw a 4×4 without much trouble. A good blade and proper setup is required. Have you watched the obligatory band saw setup video?

Band Saw Clinic with Alex Snodgrass

Cheers,
Brad

PS: If you are willing to do a little drive time, expand your search further… (OWWM Rule #8) I’ve been known to drive 4 hours or more one way to pick up a super deal, and my dog loves getting out and seeing the world :)

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View joey502's profile

joey502

487 posts in 983 days


#15 posted 11-25-2015 02:33 AM


And as for power… if you read the manual for the original Delta BS (which is what pretty much every imported cast iron clone is patterned after), it says a 1/3 HP motor is sufficient for most use, and a 1/2 HP motor should be used for production work or when using a riser with heavy or thick stock. The most important factor is to have a properly setup saw and use the proper blade… adding horsepower to overcome those deficiencies is not the solution.

It sounds like your BS needs some tweaking, as you should be able to resaw a 4×4 without much trouble. A good blade and proper setup required. Have you watched the obligatory band saw setup video?

Band Saw Clinic with Alex Snodgrass

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

I agree. The small investment of a nice blade and a couple hours tuning the saw could fix all of your problems.

What type of feed rate are you looking to achieve? Resawing is not as quick as a rip cut on the TS. If the stock is feed into the blade faster than the blade can eject the sawdust then you will have poor results. This is why higher pitch blades do not resaw well. The board should also be kept in the same plane for the entire cut, i.e. if the cut starts with the board 90 degrees to the table and that angle changes during the cut the blade will bind and not cut as efficiently.

I have a 12” Craftsman (3/4HP), it is used to resaw often enough that I never change to a different size blade. I use a 3/4” wide blade with 3 TPI. The saw was tuned up after watching (twice) the video Brad linked above.

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