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Finishing Bowls with different finishes inside and outside....

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Forum topic by XquietflyX posted 11-24-2015 09:33 PM 797 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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XquietflyX

289 posts in 427 days


11-24-2015 09:33 PM

This Holiday season I’m creating three sets of salad bowls for my various relatives and this is my initial thoughts on finishing them.
For the Aspen bowl, I will Stain the Exteriors with KEDA analine dye to give the wood some “pop” then coat the exterior with Shellac. The inside of the Bowl will be finished with Polymerized Tung oil. The Walnut bowl exteriors will be wet sanded to 400 with BLO. The interior will be finished with mineral oil.
The cherry bowl exteriors will be finished with Watco .The interior of the bowl with Polymerized Tung oil.

These bowls aren’t turned but rather scroll sawed. ( by hand unless a miracle occurs and i win the ringmaster, although I’m getting fairly good at doing it by hand, not that it matters)
I’m looking for honest opinions. I’ve looked at about 30 bazillion different boards and post about what is and is not “food safe”.

I haven’t done this before, and i also haven’t seen much about people using different finishes on the inside and out side of bowls.
So i’ll take any words of sage advice!!!!
thanks guys!
-Chris

-- You can tell a lot about your wife by her hands, for example if they are around your throat she's prolly pissed off at you...


18 replies so far

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SASmith

1850 posts in 2454 days


#1 posted 11-24-2015 10:39 PM

I sometimes use general's salad bowl finish

I take it that you are not turning your scrollsaw bowls on a lathe. I do. So sometime I use a friction finish of mineral oil, shellac, and alcohol. The benefit of a friction finish is the lack of drying time.

-- Scott Smith, Southern Illinois

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XquietflyX

289 posts in 427 days


#2 posted 11-24-2015 11:20 PM

I wish i had lathe to do that

-- You can tell a lot about your wife by her hands, for example if they are around your throat she's prolly pissed off at you...

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Jerry

1769 posts in 1115 days


#3 posted 11-25-2015 03:31 AM

Hey XquietflyX, I’m going to go out on a limb here and offer some advice. Items that are intended for food use will be safer if a food grade oil is used. I recommend that you try walnut oil. It’s available at decent woodworking stores, is certified as food grade, and provides a rich and beautiful finish.

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://geraldlhunsucker.com/

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Porchfish

751 posts in 1999 days


#4 posted 11-25-2015 01:52 PM

Good morning friend,
As Jerry says, food safe finishes are important. Did you know that a Watco finish when completely dry is inert and food safe. I have used it on cutting boards and bowls for years. I am allergic to straight Walnut oil and get a slight rash when working with the wood itself (turning or constructing) . I take benedryl before working with walnut per family practitioners advice..he is a carver/turner too. I’ve also discovered the usefulness of protective heat sleeves often worn by welder and mechanics working around hot engine parts.I cut,bleed and bruise easily. The world is full of goodies that we can adapt to our work. Wish we didn’t live so far away. I have built two large bowl turning lathes over the years and would enjoy working with you to see you build a lathe suitable for your purposes. In any case, let me wish you and your family a “Happy Turkey Day ” don s.

-- The pig caught under the fence is always the one doing all the squealing !

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XquietflyX

289 posts in 427 days


#5 posted 11-25-2015 03:04 PM

Here are the two “practice” bowls im using to test how im going to do the final ones.

This one has a live edge and i think will become the house bread basket.

This one is a scalloped version i drew up in pollymania.

Thanks for the advice Don, ill try Watco as an interior bowl finish too. I do wishi lived closer as i love to learn from anyone willing to teach!

Thanks again to everyone for the advice!!!

-- You can tell a lot about your wife by her hands, for example if they are around your throat she's prolly pissed off at you...

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ChefHDAN

809 posts in 2316 days


#6 posted 11-25-2015 03:24 PM

Chris,
1st fantastic work, those look great, I’m curious how you sand them?

I think IMHO, that you’d have some challenges keeping the exterior and interior finishes separate with the way your joints are working because they’d bleed through. I don’t really produce much that is food contact, but work with loads of it, for my conscience I always treat all wood with food safe finishes that are primarily all natural element based, ie mineral oil & bees wax. That said though, now you’ve got me thinking because there are a few food items I’ve produced over the years that get colored from natural products like beet juice, tea/coffee etc…...

Hmmmnnhhh???

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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XquietflyX

289 posts in 427 days


#7 posted 11-25-2015 11:17 PM

So this is the live edge bowl with one coat of watco. The grain didnt quite take the way i wanted but this is why we do test runs first. The next one gets a seal coat of shellac.

The next coat or to of watco should make it pop more. I’ll post more as i get more results.

-- You can tell a lot about your wife by her hands, for example if they are around your throat she's prolly pissed off at you...

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XquietflyX

289 posts in 427 days


#8 posted 11-26-2015 01:07 AM

I have a Guinevere sanding system from king Arthur tools that allows me sand almost anything. Plus the standard ros and block sanders everyone uses…


Chris,
1st fantastic work, those look great, I m curious how you sand them?

I think IMHO, that you d have some challenges keeping the exterior and interior finishes separate with the way your joints are working because they d bleed through. I don t really produce much that is food contact, but work with loads of it, for my conscience I always treat all wood with food safe finishes that are primarily all natural element based, ie mineral oil & bees wax. That said though, now you ve got me thinking because there are a few food items I ve produced over the years that get colored from natural products like beet juice, tea/coffee etc…...

Hmmmnnhhh???

- ChefHDAN

-- You can tell a lot about your wife by her hands, for example if they are around your throat she's prolly pissed off at you...

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hairy

2384 posts in 2999 days


#9 posted 11-26-2015 12:37 PM



Chris,
1st fantastic work, those look great, I m curious how you sand them?

I think IMHO, that you d have some challenges keeping the exterior and interior finishes separate with the way your joints are working because they d bleed through. I don t really produce much that is food contact, but work with loads of it, for my conscience I always treat all wood with food safe finishes that are primarily all natural element based, ie mineral oil & bees wax. That said though, now you ve got me thinking because there are a few food items I ve produced over the years that get colored from natural products like beet juice, tea/coffee etc…...

Hmmmnnhhh???

- ChefHDAN

What he said. I would skip the 2 separate finishes and just use a beeswax. I no longer put on a finish when I make spoons and kitchen tools, have not yet tried that on bowls. I like to use ash wood because it will not impart an odor of flavor to the food.

-- stay thirsty my friends...

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OSU55

1063 posts in 1456 days


#10 posted 11-27-2015 05:10 AM

Regular poly is inert after curing. Thin it 50% and apply just like those Danish oils – same result, less money.

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XquietflyX

289 posts in 427 days


#11 posted 11-30-2015 02:30 AM

Here is the wavy bowl I posted earlier. It’s sealed with shellac, then coated with watco. I polished it with a mixture of mineral oil, orange oil and beeswax.

-- You can tell a lot about your wife by her hands, for example if they are around your throat she's prolly pissed off at you...

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BurlyBob

3695 posts in 1732 days


#12 posted 11-30-2015 02:41 AM

Those area really neat bowls. That curvy one is really unique.

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XquietflyX

289 posts in 427 days


#13 posted 11-30-2015 02:18 PM

This is the final test bowl.

-- You can tell a lot about your wife by her hands, for example if they are around your throat she's prolly pissed off at you...

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XquietflyX

289 posts in 427 days


#14 posted 12-02-2015 05:07 PM

With the test bowls done, it was time to cut the actual gift bowls out of good wood.

In this case Cherry and Walnut 3/4 stock.
Here are the finished cuts.

Here are the bowls stacked for glue up.

Gluing and sanding still to come…..

-- You can tell a lot about your wife by her hands, for example if they are around your throat she's prolly pissed off at you...

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ChefHDAN

809 posts in 2316 days


#15 posted 12-02-2015 07:16 PM

Looking good, can’t wait to see your projects go up when they’re finished

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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