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Forum topic by Partridge posted 12-30-2009 07:28 PM 1884 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Partridge

296 posts in 3418 days


12-30-2009 07:28 PM

Topic tags/keywords: trick tip

Any ideas on how to fill gaps and make it look good. all ready glue. It is a drawer side.

i was thinking black epoxy

side

side2

-- I get out in the shop when I can


16 replies so far

View webwood's profile

webwood

626 posts in 2712 days


#1 posted 12-30-2009 07:35 PM

i take sawdust from the project (i have cups for each type of wood) mixed with glue , and fill the gaps – sand flush after dry -

-- -erik & christy-

View Andrew's profile

Andrew

709 posts in 2661 days


#2 posted 12-30-2009 07:39 PM

What is that? Oak on Maple? I do what is decsribed above, your tagline is funny.

-- Even a broken clock is right twice a day, unless, it moves at half speed like ....-As the Saw Turns

View patron's profile

patron

13535 posts in 2803 days


#3 posted 12-30-2009 07:40 PM

webwood’s idea is the best match ,
and the easiest .

black epoxy ,
will make it look like it already does !

and the black tint will get into the grain .

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View SnowyRiver's profile

SnowyRiver

51452 posts in 2943 days


#4 posted 12-30-2009 07:55 PM

I agree with webwood too. I usually mix fine sawdust from the wood I have used with poly glue fill the gaps and sand it.

-- Wayne - Plymouth MN

View bayspt's profile

bayspt

292 posts in 3167 days


#5 posted 12-30-2009 08:11 PM

I agree with the dust. Mix with glue till a paste. I tend to smear a little even in tight fitting joints. I too found your tag line funny. Oh the little ironies in life. If I spent as much time working as fixing my mistakes, I would produce twice as much. Of course I wouldn’t learn a whole lot.

-- Jimmy, Oklahoma "It's a dog-eat-dog world, and I'm wearing milkbone underwear!"

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8523 posts in 3111 days


#6 posted 12-30-2009 08:16 PM

I have to go against sawdust mix – it still will look like a fix, since the sawdust mix doesnt have grain.

instead of trying to fix the maple side – I recommend trying to fill the oak front.

here is how I did it and you really can’t tell it was fixed now.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View Partridge's profile

Partridge

296 posts in 3418 days


#7 posted 12-30-2009 08:48 PM

thankyou or the ideas.

-- I get out in the shop when I can

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8901 posts in 3562 days


#8 posted 12-30-2009 09:51 PM

I had to chuckle as I read your signature line:)

Anyway, the epoxy and sawdust fix is a common one that I use.

PurpLev brings up a valid point. The epoxy and sawdust mix does not have grain but it does a pretty good job overall and with the size of gap may exceed the limits of what may be offered to hid the error with this solution.

You could certainly try PurpLev’s solution of inserting slivers of like wood into the gaps.

You might try both fixes to see how they work out and that way you will have a good first-hand experience with both of these methods.

Black colored epoxy would not be a good idea.

Good Luck!

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View Partridge's profile

Partridge

296 posts in 3418 days


#9 posted 12-31-2009 03:01 AM

Todd,
This allso made me chuckle went i realized what i wrote. I am going to change this.

as for the fix i decided to go with slivers. I am going to fume this project. my thinking is sense the fix is wood that it will act like wood good or bad.

but i am going to try saw dust and epoxy. when the need arises.

Here is the fix.

1

2

3

I will post finshed door to see if my theory is right.

-- I get out in the shop when I can

View patron's profile

patron

13535 posts in 2803 days


#10 posted 12-31-2009 03:05 AM

much gooder !
i also do both sometimes .

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View Rog's profile

Rog

59 posts in 3220 days


#11 posted 12-31-2009 03:42 AM

Ok little brother that is much better. 99% better kinda like. Do it right the first time. Becuase fixing it is a wast of time. I’m surprised that no one ever caught that. LOL you always put a smile on my face…....

-- I get out to the shop when Ryan lets me. Arggggggggggg

View nmkidd's profile

nmkidd

758 posts in 2635 days


#12 posted 12-31-2009 06:16 PM

I’ve tried numerous off-the-shelf so called wood fillers …...resulting in a crappy looking fill

My choice is the saw dust and glue method

-- Doug, New Mexico.......the only stupid question is one that is never asked!........don't fix it, if it ain't broke!

View Partridge's profile

Partridge

296 posts in 3418 days


#13 posted 12-31-2009 07:59 PM

ok the magority of you go with saw dust in glue, OK. Her is what I want to know is this a fix that will sain, or change with wood coloring… glue left on wood when finish (ie stained, oiled, clear coat, et.) will show up yellow. this fix to me would be better suited for painted work or gap filling were thing are not going to be seen.

Epoxy and saw dust seems like a good filler if you tinted it to the ending finish color.

It is good to have choices and there is not one fix that will work in all situations.

-- I get out in the shop when I can

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8901 posts in 3562 days


#14 posted 01-06-2010 11:08 PM

I just came back to see the results. I should have stopped back sooner.

One thing to keep in mind is that with both the glue or epoxy and sawdust (I also use super glue and sawdust) the glue line will typically be darker than the surrounding area. Once any stain is added it tends to blend fairly well.

Looking at your repair I think that the corrective action would be a combination of slivers followed by glue and sawdust combo.

I am sure that you just learned more by experience than any book or anybody could tell you about.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View bsherman's profile

bsherman

76 posts in 2990 days


#15 posted 01-12-2010 12:53 AM

Well cool. I’m glad I’m not the only one who has done the “slivers” thing. It looks great.

-- Brian

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