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Forum topic by pnewelljr posted 11-23-2015 04:51 PM 800 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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pnewelljr

22 posts in 555 days


11-23-2015 04:51 PM

I am working to recreate this bed myself:

http://www.hedgehousefurniture.com/shop/solid-walnut-bed-frame-and-headboard

I’ve got most of it figured out. Just wondering how you think they attached the headboard and footboard panels to the posts? What kind of joint can do that?

I am planning on using metal rail hangers for the side panels.

I am new to this so trying to find the simplest option for the same effect. Thanks for any suggestions!


9 replies so far

View DrTebi's profile

DrTebi

255 posts in 2729 days


#1 posted 11-23-2015 05:10 PM

The simplest option is probably to use dowels. Another is to use loose tenons, either your own (cut a mortise on both pieces, then make a loose tenon that fits), or use a Festool Domino.

A more advanced option is to use a mortise and tenon, or even a double mortise and tenon. This is most likely the strongest option.

If you don’t mind a slight visual clue to the joinery, you could even have it easier and just screw them on, but counter-sink the screws about 1/8” – 1/4” and fit the screw hole with a wooden plug that you cut from the same wood. If you orient the grain the same way, it will be hardly visible at all (especially after finishing).

The kit that I have is this one but there are smaller sets, and other brands… for less money.

I am sure there are more solutions, but these are the ones on the top of my head…

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pnewelljr

22 posts in 555 days


#2 posted 11-23-2015 05:20 PM

Thank you! And then there is a piece of wood attached to the side rails that hold up the slats. Would glue and pocket holes be enough to hold that? or is there some other kind of special joint people use for that piece?

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pintodeluxe

4854 posts in 2276 days


#3 posted 11-23-2015 07:15 PM

It all depends on the equipment you have available. I use mortise and tenon joints for bed construction. Even the bed bolt connections have dry mortise and tenon joints to further support the bed rails.

The main issue with that bed design is the wide solid headboard panel. You will need to allow for wood movement, or the panel will eventually crack. A long groove in the headboad legs could receive the tenoned headboard panel. If you only glue the center 8” of the panel, and let it float at the top and bottom you should be fine. Otherwise you can peg the M&T joints through slotted holes like a breadboard end.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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jdh122

879 posts in 2280 days


#4 posted 11-23-2015 07:20 PM

Be sure and account for wood movement. The most common way to do that joint is with two mortises (and tenons) on each side, connected by a groove. With this you glue the top tenon only, while the bottom one will be pegged through a slot in the tenon so the headboard and expand and contract without breaking something.
Or one long tenon, with glue only one part of it (probably the middle, and pegged through slots at top and bottom).

Edit: Willie beat me to it…

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

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jdh122

879 posts in 2280 days


#5 posted 11-23-2015 07:34 PM

The wood attached to hold the slats: glue alone is plenty strong for that, although you need to make sure you get a good bond. I’ve generally glued and screwed them (countersink the holes). Screw from the inside obviously, so no need to use pocket screws.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

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BikerDad

284 posts in 3064 days


#6 posted 11-24-2015 12:29 AM

The description of the product answers your question. Mortise and Tenon. The headboard is likely built with the legs being “breadboard ” ends, i.e. a certain amount of extra space in the mortises to allow for expansion. You could simply call them and ask.

-- I'm happier than a tornado in a trailer park! Grace & Peace.

View Kaleb the Swede's profile

Kaleb the Swede

1727 posts in 1432 days


#7 posted 11-24-2015 01:54 AM

When I did my bed recently I used bed bolts with small quarter inch tenons. The tenons will keep the frame pieces from twisting check out this book. You can find it downloadable too. Or the library for free. Jeff Miller does an excellent job explaining different joints and jigs to make them.

http://www.rockler.com/beds-book?utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_term=&utm_content=pla_with_promotion&utm_campaign=PL&sid=V9146&gclid=Cj0KEQiAj8uyBRDawI3XhYqOy4gBEiQAl8BJbQmmW0Ks0KJJQGmwJ6LCo4KrQvjc4JoiZAuTLGCKwu8aAvv78P8HAQ

-- Just trying to build something beautiful

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DrTebi

255 posts in 2729 days


#8 posted 11-24-2015 02:18 AM



Thank you! And then there is a piece of wood attached to the side rails that hold up the slats. Would glue and pocket holes be enough to hold that? or is there some other kind of special joint people use for that piece?

- pnewelljr


Even glue alone would work. You have two long-grain surfaces that will be glued together all the way, so it should hold very well with glue. You can use a few screws or nails to help you align everything.

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jumbojack

1667 posts in 2087 days


#9 posted 11-24-2015 02:38 AM

I dowel mine

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

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