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Cyclones for a 1 man shop

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Forum topic by cso posted 11-23-2015 02:35 AM 703 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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cso

78 posts in 2150 days


11-23-2015 02:35 AM

Topic tags/keywords: dust collector dust collector grizzly oneida

Can’t decide between the Grizzly cyclone
at $1074 with shipping or the Oneida V series} at $1822 (with shipping) with the added options that are standard for the Grizzly.

Seems like a huge price difference. I know that the motors are very different (Taiwan vs. USA), and everything else about Oneida seems great, but is it $700 or so better? The Grizzly is steel and the Oneida is a plastic resin material, Any opinions out there?


13 replies so far

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AZWoody

693 posts in 686 days


#1 posted 11-23-2015 02:39 AM

Depending what you’re actually looking for it to do, you might be underwhelmed with any machine that’s 1 1/2 hp.
If you’re in the price range of $1822, you might as well look at the clearvue and also the penn state models as well.

Small shop or large shop, to get the dust from the source, (at the machine) you need to move a lot of air and 3hp is the starting point.

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cso

78 posts in 2150 days


#2 posted 11-23-2015 02:50 AM

I agree, 3hp is probably the way to go. The Grizzly 3hp is $1475 with shipping and the Oneida V Series 3hp} is $1922 with shipping. Still off $450 or so. Still having trouble with plastic “resin” versus steel at a lower price. Any further thoughts? I own a Grizzly planer and a jointer both 3hp units, and have had zero issues in the 5 or so years I’ve owned them. Just wondering if anyone can help me with the performance/price ratio if that it is possible.

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waho6o9

7172 posts in 2039 days


#3 posted 11-23-2015 02:50 AM

http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_odkw=dust+collecting+syslones&_osacat=0&_from=R40&_trksid=p2045573.m570.l1313.TR0.TRC0.H0.Xdust+collecting+cyclones.TRS0&_nkw=dust+collecting+cyclones&_sacat=0

Ebay has some similar units as well even though you trying to decide between Oneida and Grizzly. The above
pictured Oneida has me wondering if the 700.00 could be better spent elsewhere.

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AZWoody

693 posts in 686 days


#4 posted 11-23-2015 03:00 AM



I agree, 3hp is probably the way to go. The Grizzly 3hp is $1475 with shipping and the Oneida V Series 3hp} is $1922 with shipping. Still off $450 or so. Still having trouble with plastic “resin” versus steel at a lower price. Any further thoughts? I own a Grizzly planer and a jointer both 3hp units, and have had zero issues in the 5 or so years I ve owned them. Just wondering if anyone can help me with the performance/price ratio if that it is possible.

- cso

I have quite a few grizzly tools as well but when I was looking at the dust collection side, they are much higher priced when comparing apples to apples. If you want to compare a 5hp to a 5hp. Also, I have been in their Springfield showroom to look at them, and the 3 and 5hp units are pretty huge. They take up a lot of space. Anything, in that range will, but these seemed larger than my clearvue.

I wouldn’t worry about the resin. The clearvue uses a plastic cyclone as well. Go to clearvue’s website and look at their units. Their 5hp isn’t going to be much more than the 3hp you’re looking at.

Also, don’t forget the accessories. Ducting, hoses, gates, all of that can cost you half the cost of the unit or more easy depending on how many machine you’re going to hook up. At the 3hp range, you’re going to be wanting to run 6” ducting and hoses for the most part.

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cso

78 posts in 2150 days


#5 posted 11-23-2015 03:13 AM

I’m lucky, I have access to any ducting I want (part of my father in law’s business fabricates spiral ducts)...a non-issue for me. I have some of it my shop already. Came from a Jet 1100 with Wynn filter and retrofitted Vortex kit, but just sold it. I would like to make the process of dumping chips easier and quicker in a more efficient manner with better fine dust collection. Has anyone had any experience with the new Jet cyclones? More specifically, the 3hp model? Thanks for your input!

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josephf

125 posts in 1559 days


#6 posted 11-23-2015 03:15 AM

i would like to hear a bit more about what you use it on and how you use it . i use a 1 1/2hp collector with a cyclone . i move the hose from machine to machine . most of my work is done in the field but still i do plenty of prep work in my 50×20 shop . point is this works fine for me . The OP maynot need anything bigger . Though bigger might just be better .

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cso

78 posts in 2150 days


#7 posted 11-23-2015 03:23 AM

Thanks for your post, josephf. My shop is only 20 by 20, moving a machine around would be awkward. Even though the cost is higher, I’m leaning towards the Oneida V series. I think…

View WoodNSawdust's profile

WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 639 days


#8 posted 11-23-2015 03:38 AM

Rockler has the 3hp Laguna (spelling) on sale. You might want to take a look at it. Laguna has poor customer service but good equipment.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

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SFP

14 posts in 718 days


#9 posted 11-23-2015 03:43 AM

Remember that there is a significant loss of suction due to the air turbulence created by a cyclone. Wouldn’t even look at anything less than 3 hp. Multi-machines go with 5 hp. You won’t regret it!

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cso

78 posts in 2150 days


#10 posted 11-23-2015 03:53 AM

Good point SFP!

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AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1771 days


#11 posted 11-23-2015 04:04 AM

5 hp clear vue would be my choice.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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Fred Hargis

3933 posts in 1955 days


#12 posted 11-23-2015 02:48 PM

If you’ve moved up to that price range, and given the fact that ductwork cost isn’t an issue, go with the CV. You’ll get great performance not only in air flow, but in separation of the dust before the air hits the filter. I’m still kicking myself for not buying one instead of my Oneida SDG.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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BikerDad

284 posts in 3063 days


#13 posted 11-24-2015 12:23 AM

The plastic resin cyclones have two advantages over the steel. First, they are anti-static. Not a big deal, but handy. Second, plastic molding/forming allows them to optimize the cyclone itself without significantly increasing the production cost. Once you get into the REALLY big units, (we’re talking industrial sized), the sheer size of the cyclone and power of the motors reduces/eliminates the advantage that a resin cyclone may have, and in fact the size factor can flip the advantages, where it’s actually cheaper to fab a really big cyclone out of steel than it would be to tool up and mold one.

-- I'm happier than a tornado in a trailer park! Grace & Peace.

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