LumberJocks

Value grade hand tools.

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by monkeykoder posted 1697 days ago 995 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View monkeykoder's profile

monkeykoder

19 posts in 1697 days


1697 days ago

I’m looking to get geared up for a little puttering shop in the garage where I’m renting and I’m looking to go with the whole by hand approach (partly for cash reasons). So I’m looking for a list of necessary tools to get basic projects done my reading so far says something along the lines of a dovetail saw, ripsaw, crosscut saw, chisels, and some sort of plane. I have chisels to work with and a ripsaw (neither I’m guessing is very high quality). So the question is what are the cheapest tools that won’t get in my way (make it harder for me to work) and are there any tools to add to that list (I was thinking a ryoba to replace the crosscut and rip saws). And what is the first plane that I should get (mostly looking at furniture right now)?


20 replies so far

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2275 days


#1 posted 1697 days ago

ryoba is a good start.

get a #5 stanley plane (craigslist/ebay) it’s an all around plane, and with little work can do great work from rough milling to finishing boards.

get some sharpening supplies. this is an expense people don’t think about. dry/wet sand papers (scarysharp method) or water stones, or get a blade sharpener (slow/wet grinder, or worksharp, or equivalent)

get GOOD measuring and marking tools. these are critical – don’t cheap out too much on those.

and take it one step at a time…

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View Andrew's profile

Andrew

709 posts in 1825 days


#2 posted 1697 days ago

I have had poor experience with “value grade tools”. you get what you pay for.
However, a thinning wallet forces us in that direction. Chisels are an important aspect of what we do. Unless you are going to use them a lot, get a couple of cheap sets, harbor freight maybe. I have 4 sets of Tool Shop chisels from menards. I but them when they are on sale. They sharpen easily, but don’t hold an edge too well. But they cost me $5 for a set of 4, I use them for a lot of stuff, grind the hell out of them, beat the handels off them, you name it, they get abused, and reused. but I don’t mind they hardly cost anything, and I can put a new handle on them when ever I wish. I like Japaneese hand saws, they can cost $40 or so from Rockler with 2 blades onne for flush cutting and 1 for crosscutting, the blades are interchangeable, and when I break off a couple teeth I get a new set, then I have a handle for each blade and an extra blade. I agree good measuring tools, 1 combination ( sliding ) square, a good tapemeasure I like the flat back for most things, but they are soft and limp, so something require the steel type, 1 tri square, 1 plain square 2 feet long at least. Some 2X4s to build a couple of sawhorses ( buy the cull lumber from HomeDepot, my store sells 4 foot peices for 51 cents a peice.
Maybe a book that teaches simple joinery with some projects included for practice and inspiration.
With this you will become addicted, and regularly upgrade, It won’t take to long to realize that you should buy the best tools you can afford. Decide on the project you are going to build, then acquire one tool to help with that. It spreads the cost out a little and prevents the purcase of a whole shop at one time.
Good Luck and welcome to the arena.

-- Even a broken clock is right twice a day, unless, it moves at half speed like ....-As the Saw Turns

View monkeykoder's profile

monkeykoder

19 posts in 1697 days


#3 posted 1697 days ago

Well I have one speed square which should work for my first project (kid’s play table out of leftover 2×4s). So what would you consider “value” brands (value grade think Milwaukee/Porter Cable but in hand tools).

View Andrew's profile

Andrew

709 posts in 1825 days


#4 posted 1697 days ago

In that case, Stanley, but you can get cheaper stuff from Harbor Frieght. When I think “Value grade” I think of HF and Great Neck, also Northern Tool. Some decent value can be had from Sears and the Craftsman line but Check the reveiws, the quality can be hit or miss. If you pick things out carefully, you can get some decent stuff cheap, or you can get cheap stuff period.

-- Even a broken clock is right twice a day, unless, it moves at half speed like ....-As the Saw Turns

View monkeykoder's profile

monkeykoder

19 posts in 1697 days


#5 posted 1697 days ago

I guess I missed a tool I probably need, a good brace or hand drill (power drills just don’t seem to have the same accuracy).

View Andrew's profile

Andrew

709 posts in 1825 days


#6 posted 1696 days ago

Okay, not sure what the accuracey issue is with powered drills, but here is a link to a website I came across looking for other stuff.
http://www.traditionalwoodworker.com/default.php/cPath/355.
Good luck.

-- Even a broken clock is right twice a day, unless, it moves at half speed like ....-As the Saw Turns

View monkeykoder's profile

monkeykoder

19 posts in 1697 days


#7 posted 1696 days ago

Well after about 1-2 hours in woodcraft looking at planes (because face it they’re gorgeous…) I ended up picking up a Wood River No. 3 which (I hope) means that I can get to making some small pieces pretty soon I still need a dovetail saw and a ryoba plus sharpening accessories (I believe measuring tools are handled). I just hope my tool budget goes up a little bit soon because I blew almost all of it on the one plane (stupid $100 tool budget).

View dmorrison's profile

dmorrison

145 posts in 1888 days


#8 posted 1696 days ago

The Wood river plans are actually rated OK. But the Groz are rated better IF they are tuned. I just went though the decision of $80 for a Stanley Sweet Heart low angle block plane or both the Groz rabbit plane AND low angle block plane. The Stanley was ordered and paid for at Rockler ( it has not come in yet) . But after comparing the 2, I decided to go with the 2 Groz planes. They must be tuned and I will take the time to do this. The Stanley plane is a far superior plane, But I got 2 for 1 with the Groz units. And I only bought them due to a magazine article that supported the Groz planes.
So the decision you have to make is how much to spend and on what tools.

Here is a video for tuning a plane.

http://www.finewoodworking.com/SkillsAndTechniques/SkillsAndTechniquesArticle.aspx?id=5218

Dave

View Andrew's profile

Andrew

709 posts in 1825 days


#9 posted 1696 days ago

Sears, has your Hand drill for about $30, Yeah I get the tool budget too. But I also get a wood budget, make sure you save enough money to buy something to work with (on). A great first project is a small bench or work surface to do stuff on you can see all kinds of bench ideas on this site. Also since you are hell bent on hand tool, you will want a wood vise, (Grizzley.com has these $30) buy that first, so you can work it into your bench, it should be flush with the top so it doesn’t get in the way when it is not in use, try to get one with an adjustable dog, but you can built that into the wood face you put on the vise, line up some other dog hole with the one from the vise, plus some more just incase. you can make a dog by inserting a 3/4” dowel inro a small block or wood, keep in mind the bench will double for storage underneath, and should be kind of heavy and very sturdy. Also you can get a Holdfast, or hold down, that you just smack with a mallet that will secure most items to the bench, look for ones that are 11/16” at the base, so you can have the 3/4” dog holes, These are regulrly around $13 each, 2 is all you need. These are all staples in the Woodwrights shop. He makes things with hand tools look really easy, cause his tolls are super sharp. Oh yeah, and sandpaper, your going to need some of that, and some glue, maybe some screws. And a mallet, a simple mallet, but a mallet, lots of wood project get marred when using a hammer, so make a mallet first, so you can use it to make your bench. Then lots of other things will creep up, more planes. Planes are probably the most Zen hand tool in the world, when they are tuned and set just right, the thin shaving curling up in the throat ( of the plane) will make you giggle. You will want a small block plane for small trimming situations, then maybe a shoulder or rabbit plane, a smoothing plane, and then mabe some different molding planes, then a jointer plane. Oh my sickness is getting me in trouble again. I am still waiting for the budget to allow me a shoulder or rabbit plane, hopefully this year, Christmas is coming. Not soon but it is coming.

-- Even a broken clock is right twice a day, unless, it moves at half speed like ....-As the Saw Turns

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5418 posts in 2002 days


#10 posted 1696 days ago

On older #5 and a block plane from Bailey, Millers Falls, or Record can be very good tools and great deals….lots available.

I’ve had good results from the Irwin/Marples chisels made in Sheffield, and the Narex chisels made in the Czech Republic…neither too expensive. Learn to sharpen them.

The Crown hand saws are a pretty good deal too…the last I knew, Holbren sold them.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2275 days


#11 posted 1696 days ago

not to spoil the party. but a #3 plane is a smoothing plane, its purpose is to put a smooth finish on a board – after it has been milled. you’ll have a hard time milling boards with a #3 = jointing, planing then from rough form to dimensions… you are better off with a #5 which can handle BOTH tasks (finishing AND milling) – I’d vote to replace the #3 with a #5 at woodcraft. the Woodriver are actually rated well. not sure who mentioned that Groz are rated better, but from what I’ve read it’s the other way around.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12260 posts in 2724 days


#12 posted 1696 days ago

Most pre WW2 used hand tools are better than current production tools. Do you have flea markets and antique stores around?

Get a copy of this book. It has the info you need to use hand tools as well as identifies what you need…

http://www.amazon.com/Hand-Tools-Their-Ways-Workings/dp/0393322769/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1260159316&sr=1-2#noop

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View pommy's profile

pommy

1697 posts in 2318 days


#13 posted 1696 days ago

i’m a hugh lover of old second hand tools the quility is so much better like Wayne says go to flea markets or second hand stores the only new bit of kit i brought new was my table saw and i wish i hadn’t the brushes are forever going so stick with the old they were built to last remember that…....

-- cut it saw it scrap it SKPE: ANDREW.CARTER69

View monkeykoder's profile

monkeykoder

19 posts in 1697 days


#14 posted 1696 days ago

Thanks everyone for the advice I’ll try to make sure my next plane purchase is a #5 I could use suggestions on antique stores if anyone lives near Sacramento CA… The only one I knew of has closed.

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12260 posts in 2724 days


#15 posted 1696 days ago

I also live in Sacramento.

Antique Trove in Roseville. There are a few tool friendly sellers in there. Hollar if you want me to show you a few planes currently in there worth buying… http://www.antiquetrove.com/locations.asp

Denios in Roseville often has good used tools.

There are several antiques stores on 57th street. The one all the way to the back on the left has a good tool selection http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=sacramento+antique+stores&aq=0&aql=&aqi=g1&oq=sacramento+antique+store

There is a monthly antique faire under the WX freeway. Second Sunday of the month. Find lots of good tools there. http://www.sacantiquefaire.com/

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

showing 1 through 15 of 20 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase