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Forum topic by BDWeimar posted 12-28-2009 04:34 AM 7578 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BDWeimar

4 posts in 2539 days


12-28-2009 04:34 AM

Topic tags/keywords: tablesaw question resource tip used

I have been reading the forums here for a while and decide to ask my own question. I am looking to buy my first table saw here soon. I am looking at a used Craftsman from 10 or so years ago tomorrow. Is there anything big that I should specifically looking for in a used saw in terms of problem areas? I guess any advice you guys have on buying a used saw would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Ben


26 replies so far

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WayneC

12642 posts in 3564 days


#1 posted 12-28-2009 05:36 AM

Are you open to saws other than craftsman? What price range are you looking at?

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 3140 days


#2 posted 12-28-2009 05:41 AM

A use Delta contractor saw would be a good choice to.

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BDWeimar

4 posts in 2539 days


#3 posted 12-28-2009 05:44 AM

I am open for any brand. The first hit on craigslist was for a Craftsman. I am in the $300 range, that is why I am looking for a used saw. I guess my question is, are their any huge warning signs I should look out for on a used saw.

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 3140 days


#4 posted 12-28-2009 05:45 AM

Make sure its running, and all the parts are there. The table saw may need some TLC.

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knotscott

7224 posts in 2842 days


#5 posted 12-28-2009 06:30 AM

A good fence is always nice, as are cast iron wings….condition is a big factor in price too. It’s always nice to have a miter gauge and blade guard intact. Good condition with an upgraded fence and solid cast wings will command more than a beat up saw with steel wings and a crappy fence. As long as the basic bones of the saw are good, the good stuff can be added later. $300 is a pretty fair price for a good example.

You may also want to check out the local price of a Ridgid R4511 around you…I’m hearing rumors of $300-$400 new, plus there’s a Friends & Family discount ‘til 12/31.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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Moron

5032 posts in 3360 days


#6 posted 12-28-2009 06:41 AM

plug it in

turn it “on”

make sure it starts…................stays running without making werd sounds for at least 3 2 5 minutes

the “low ball em”

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

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WayneC

12642 posts in 3564 days


#7 posted 12-28-2009 06:47 AM

Stay away from direct drive saws. Make sure you can mount a dado blade on the arbor. Should have standard miter tracks and should come with good fence and miter gage. Should have a wrench for the Arbor.

I would also consider saving a bit and getting one of the rigids new.

Some times a $500 unisaw shows up on craigslist…. Make sure it is single phase…

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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a1Jim

115206 posts in 3044 days


#8 posted 12-28-2009 06:56 AM

I’m not found of sears saws but the ridgid 4511 is a good choice for saws around $ 500. and it has a good fence that’s a very important issue with table saws and I also agree that direct drive saws are not worth having.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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WayneC

12642 posts in 3564 days


#9 posted 12-28-2009 07:03 AM

I guess that I should add that I am not fond of craftsman saws as well. Had a 3hp direct drive model. Tried to cut some 2” oak and scared the hell out of me. I moved up to a unisaw.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Don's profile

Don

514 posts in 2540 days


#10 posted 12-28-2009 08:36 AM

Make sure the arbor is square to the miter tracks or easy to adjust.
Also, if you can spare more than $300 do so. A good table saw is the best investment you’ll ever make in a wood shop.

-- Don - I wood work if I could. Redmond WA.

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Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 3289 days


#11 posted 12-28-2009 01:27 PM

I have to agree with the comments that Jim and Wayne made on the Craftman saw. The biggest problem with them is the fence. I got rid of my 10 year old Craftsman saw last year and fought with it the entire time to make decent cuts. At times it would take me from 5 to 10 minutes to line the fence up.

If you decide to go with the Craftsman saw you will be doing yourself a favor to replace the fence as soon as possible.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

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knotscott

7224 posts in 2842 days


#12 posted 12-28-2009 03:03 PM

It’s worth noting that the older Emerson (113.######) and Ryobi (315.######) made Craftsman saws have essentially the same guts as the Ridgid contractor saws that were made by Emerson from 1997 to 2004, then TTI/Ryobi from 2004 to 2008. The fences on the older Emerson made saws were sloppy, but the innerds are nearly identical, with many components that are interchangeable. All the bolt ons (like a fence, wings, motor, switches, handles,etc), can be fairly easily swapped out. Also, the new Ridgid R4511 hybrid is made by the same company that makes the current Craftsman 22114, 22124, and 22116 (Steel City’s Orion division). Many of the Craftsman saws that were disliked are a poorly designed, cheaply made saw regardless of the brand name that’s on the front of it, but they also had several models that were successfully used for decades by thousands of people. You’ll want full size (27” deep) with a belt drive induction motor as opposed to plastic and aluminum with a direct drive universal motor…usually made of cast iron, but some of the newer saws are granite. My point…Buy the saw, not the brand.

Here’s are examples of what to look for:


This is what not to buy:

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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SnowyRiver

51452 posts in 2947 days


#13 posted 12-28-2009 04:12 PM

Outside of the obvious…decent power, and be sure its running etc…I think the fence is critical. Be sure it moves easily and locks straight.

-- Wayne - Plymouth MN

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RetiredCoastie

999 posts in 2650 days


#14 posted 12-28-2009 05:46 PM

I too would stay away from the Craftsman saws. Ive owned 3 of them and all 3 had cast iron tables that were not machined true. The fence is another weakness. If you have to wait a little longer to save money for a better saw then it will be better in the long run. The table saw is the foundation tool of most woodworking shops. Find a used Delta, Rigid, Jet or better yet a Powermatic.

With the Saw Stop table saws out now people will be upgrading and that may present an opportunity for you to get a good deal on a good used saw.

Invest in good quality tools and your woodworking will reflect the investment and you will enjoy it much more!

-- www.thepatriotwoodworker.com Proud Supporter of Homes For Our Troops

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knotscott

7224 posts in 2842 days


#15 posted 12-28-2009 05:46 PM

deke – That Delta motor is still easily and inexpensively serviced if the cap is all that’s wrong. I hope you kept it as a backup, and didn’t toss it.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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