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Best way to remove dust pimples from top coats of polyurethane?

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Forum topic by Cornholesgalore posted 11-19-2015 04:34 AM 1192 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Cornholesgalore

11 posts in 422 days


11-19-2015 04:34 AM

Topic tags/keywords: finish polyurethane dust pimples how to

Just looking for opinions on what you guys do to remove dust pimples from polyurethane. I’ve tried dust proofing my room, but if it isn’t dust it is lint from my clothes, it’s tough to win. I was just wondering if someone had a method of removing the pimples. I was thinking a dremel set to a lower speed with a 2000 grit bit on it, then using turtle wax and a car buff. Has anyone tried this? If not, what has worked for you guys?

Going bonkers on these pimples!


22 replies so far

View nerdbot's profile

nerdbot

97 posts in 823 days


#1 posted 11-19-2015 05:09 AM

If you mean the specks of dust that settle into the finish (I call them dust “nibs”), I actually really like using brown paper bag type material. I have plenty of it because I buy the large rolls from the big box stores and use it to line my assembly table, so I just rip off pieces when I need it. Using it like sandpaper gets most of the nibs for me, and for the more stubborn ones, a little extra time buffing the area gets those.

View mandatory66's profile

mandatory66

201 posts in 1592 days


#2 posted 11-19-2015 05:15 AM

I second nerdbot,I use brown paper bags from the supermarket. I also use a satin varnish which helps and I wipe it on.

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

5723 posts in 2830 days


#3 posted 11-19-2015 05:25 AM

I have a 18” window fan that I use to “suck” over the finish area to keep stuff moving/floating in the air and not land on the finish.
A sort of laminar flow clean room … or at least a clean area in this case.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3932 posts in 1955 days


#4 posted 11-19-2015 12:35 PM

The kraft paper (paper bag) trick really works well, though the varnish does have to be fairly cured to use it.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View TheWoodenOyster's profile

TheWoodenOyster

1275 posts in 1397 days


#5 posted 11-19-2015 12:48 PM

ditto on the brown paper bag. Fine sandpaper – like 600 or so also can work.

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2324 posts in 1758 days


#6 posted 11-19-2015 01:41 PM

0000 steel wool and then paste wax.

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 692 days


#7 posted 11-19-2015 02:00 PM

YEP


0000 steel wool and then paste wax.

- dhazelton


-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View Cornholesgalore's profile

Cornholesgalore

11 posts in 422 days


#8 posted 11-19-2015 02:03 PM

Thanks for the advice guys, I never even thought of using a brown bag!

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3932 posts in 1955 days


#9 posted 11-19-2015 02:45 PM

Be sure to wad it up real well, if you don’t the corners can leave streaks in the finish.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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RogerM

759 posts in 1861 days


#10 posted 11-19-2015 02:51 PM

I use 800 to 1200 grit sandpaper from Klingspor followed by finishing wax put on with 0000 steel wool then buff.

-- Roger M, Aiken, SC

View WoodNSawdust's profile

WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 638 days


#11 posted 11-19-2015 04:05 PM

You could try wet sanding with the finish on future coats. The paper bag on the last coat.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

5723 posts in 2830 days


#12 posted 11-19-2015 05:07 PM

The brown bag also works fine for final sharpening!
I have used it after reading what HorizontalMike wrote about it.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View RocketDogs's profile

RocketDogs

11 posts in 944 days


#13 posted 11-20-2015 11:30 AM

You may also try wetting down the floor in your shop …. booth or finishing area with water to hold down the dust
.....I do it with my spray gun filled with water before spraying or finishing

This may help….hope it does
RocketDogs

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3932 posts in 1955 days


#14 posted 11-20-2015 12:20 PM

I like that idea of wetting the floor. Doesn’t the floor get slick enough to be a hazard?

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1056 posts in 1451 days


#15 posted 11-20-2015 12:52 PM

800-1200 sandpaper with a light touch. One or two passes usually does it. It cuts the top off dust nibs, etc.

showing 1 through 15 of 22 replies

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