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Forum topic by Gixxerjoe04 posted 11-19-2015 12:52 AM 583 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Gixxerjoe04

835 posts in 1038 days


11-19-2015 12:52 AM

So i have a rigid bandsaw, I mainly use it to cut shapes and stuff I guess you could say, with such a small hp, resawing isn’t a quality it has so I normally don’t try. Well I want to make my mom a jewelry box for Christmas. I have some walnut that’s surprisingly over an inch thick rough. So I planned to resaw it so I can have half inch thick walls for the box. Put on a basically new blade, marked a line down the middle and went at it. It seemed to track on the line pretty perfect with my fence and a feather board, that is until I flipped it over. It seems the bottom wheel is pulling the blade to the left wayyyy to much. The board was about 5” wide, it was off almost a quarter inch. So that piece of wood won’t be a box in its life. I know the problem is the bottom wheel seems to be off, but not sure what the solution is. There’s just one big bolt holding the wheels on, going left and right doesn’t look like an option. Anyone have an idea of what can be done?


19 replies so far

View fuigb's profile

fuigb

403 posts in 2419 days


#1 posted 11-19-2015 01:33 AM

Doubt your wheel is your problem, unless someone has taken apart the saw.

Start with obvious: table, blade, and fence all square? You’re keeping the stock square as it’s fed? If all “yes” then try a resaw pivot/fence. I bet, though the stock is drifting and feather boards and the pivot fix the issue.

-- - Crud. Go tell your mother that I need a Band-aid.

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jtm

218 posts in 1098 days


#2 posted 11-19-2015 01:39 AM

A lot of people seem to have success with the Snodgrass method.

Just search for it on YouTube.

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jumbojack

1667 posts in 2085 days


#3 posted 11-19-2015 01:42 AM

Several things come to my mind.
Did you joint the edge that was on the table to the face you ran against the fence?
Are you using a sharp, QUALITY resaw blade?
Is your fence at least 4” high?
Did y out u stock hang up in the throat hole and disrupt your feeding of the stock?
Proper tension on the blade? Correct feed rate?
Watch this video, it will increase your success.

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=wGbZqWac0jU

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

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Gixxerjoe04

835 posts in 1038 days


#4 posted 11-19-2015 01:42 AM

Don’t know why I didn’t think about the bed getting wacked out of alignment since I’ve never moved it since checking it the first time I got it. Need to check that, gonna feel like an idiot if that’s the case, but hopefully it is for a simple fix.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4208 posts in 1660 days


#5 posted 11-19-2015 01:42 AM

Obligatory band saw video:
Alex Snodgrass Band Saw Clinic

If that don’t do it, then your blade is probably buggered.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: There isn’t really any way a lower wheel can ‘pull’ a blade to the left.

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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conifur

955 posts in 613 days


#6 posted 11-19-2015 02:07 AM

Tell us about the blade you used, TPI? Hook, Skip ect?

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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BurlyBob

3657 posts in 1727 days


#7 posted 11-19-2015 02:24 AM

I’m interested to read what others post here as I have also been struggling with resawing. I bought that wood slicer blade from Highland and it did a real nice job. I tried using it for a few other cuts and fired it. I bought some other blades and finished my re saw project. They did quite well but I did get a bit of the problem you show in your photo. I’m looking to learn more from this topic. Thanks.

View ThomasChippendale's profile

ThomasChippendale

244 posts in 393 days


#8 posted 11-19-2015 02:56 AM

Its possible that the blade and the fence are not perfectly parallel hence the back of the blade rubs on the stock and tend to force sideways. To insure they are parallel, run a piece of scrap plywood along the fence and stop the saw in the cut and check on both side of the cut to see if the rear is evenly spaced in the kerf.

Other tips:

Use the widest blade possible
Use the fewer tooth per inches available, no more than 3 tip
Use maximum tension on the blade
build a higher fence
square the fence and blade perfectly
make sure the throat plate is even with the table surface
initiate the cut, back off and check that the cut is entered all along the width of the plank
do not expect 1/2 inch thick from 1 inch board, allow 1\8 planning
Surface that runs on the fence must be flat and straight
When mounting the blade, back off top and bottom guides and adjust them so that do not touch the blade after the blade runs true without guides.

-- PJ

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jumbojack

1667 posts in 2085 days


#9 posted 11-19-2015 02:58 AM

Burlybob
You say you tried the Woodslicer for other projects? We’re these resaw projects? I’ve run my current Woodslicer for about 10 months. I have literally cut hundreds of linear feet of everything from pine to ebony from hard maple to redwood. While I should probably hang the new one on my saw this one is still doing a serviceable job. There is a new spare hanging on the wall waiting for a special no error resaw job.
The Woodslicer is not the blade to do much of anything else other than resaw. Since it has little or no set it does not do well with curves. In fact it does a crap job on curves.
You say you fired it I read that as fried. Did it just get dull or did you break it?

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

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MrUnix

4208 posts in 1660 days


#10 posted 11-19-2015 03:03 AM

ts possible that the blade and the fence are not perfectly parallel hence the back of the blade rubs on the stock and tend to force sideways.
[...]
square the fence and blade perfectly

While it’s important to have the blade (and fence) perpendicular to the table (covered in the Snodgrass video), they do not need to be perfectly parallel to each other (front to back) – also covered in the Snodgrass video.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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ChefHDAN

806 posts in 2311 days


#11 posted 11-19-2015 03:16 AM

Gixxer, (LOVE the GSXR), I’m traveling and can’t send you a photo, but I’ve got the B1400 too and I had to replace the upper wheel hinge after trying to resaw some white oak that I tried to harvest. The upper hinge was cast aluminum and bent about 30 degrees. The new part I ordered came in and weighed about 50% more than the original part which really surprised me but shows that they learned the part was under engineered to begin with. Take your top assembly apart and if the top shaft hinge shows any deflection, that is your problem, if ti’s straight then curse my name freely, but I’d bet $50 that the top shaft hinge has been bent.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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ThomasChippendale

244 posts in 393 days


#12 posted 11-19-2015 03:23 AM

I like this video and agree with most of it. I should have written; parallel within the kerf width as Snodgrass says, nothing is perfect but within the kerf width is close to parallel with a one inch carbide blade .


ts possible that the blade and the fence are not perfectly parallel hence the back of the blade rubs on the stock and tend to force sideways.
[...]
square the fence and blade perfectly

While it s important to have the blade (and fence) perpendicular to the table (covered in the Snodgrass video), they do not need to be perfectly parallel to each other (front to back) – also covered in the Snodgrass video.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

-- PJ

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MrUnix

4208 posts in 1660 days


#13 posted 11-19-2015 03:29 AM


I like this video and agree with most of it. I should have written; parallel within the kerf width as Snodgrass says, nothing is perfect but within the kerf width is close to parallel with a one inch carbide blade .

LOL – I doubt anyone is using a 1 inch carbide blade on a Ridgid bandsaw! A 1/2” blade would probably even be pushing it to it’s limits :)

YMMV

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

806 posts in 2311 days


#14 posted 11-19-2015 03:36 AM

It will run a 3/4” but a 1/2” 3 TPI skip blade works best for resaw. I was running a 3/4” 4 TPI when I bent the top shaft bracket

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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ThomasChippendale

244 posts in 393 days


#15 posted 11-19-2015 03:41 AM

Agree but I like to tune my tools as perfectly as possible, seems to save on rework later. I don’t know about the rigid band saw but it may be undersized for resawing hardwood. I toyed around with cheap band saws for 45 years breaking blades and burning wood until I got a good band saw and I can now resaw, notch, make tenons as well as on the table saw in less time. Being able to tension the blade with a rigid frame is key, guides become almost useless.


It will run a 3/4” but a 1/2” 3 TPI skip blade works best for resaw. I was running a 3/4” 4 TPI when I bent the top shaft bracket

- ChefHDAN


Its the 3 tip that worked for you, the 3/4 inch can be tensioned more but requires better alignment as mentioned before

-- PJ

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