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What receptacles are you using to power your shop?

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Forum topic by CTWith3 posted 11-18-2015 03:42 AM 1677 views 0 times favorited 49 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CTWith3

21 posts in 392 days


11-18-2015 03:42 AM

What receptacles are you using in your shop?

I am looking at Leviton’s commercial grade 20 A duplex outlets in gray because I plan n painting my garage grey and white.

I have 4 single gang boxes for my single duplex receptacles and 1 GFCI receptacle, and have 2 two gang boxes with 2 duplex receptacles at my bench, and am looking into one of hose hand dandy receptacles with USB receptacles to charge my cell phone or iPad or i whatever.

I also have two 220V receptacles so I can work with my table saw in different areas of my garage/shop.

As time goes on I will update to only GFCI receptacles. I wad considering a GFCI breaker but the GFCI really needs to be at or near the source of the problem.

AFCI receptacles could end up becoming a standard in new houses in the near future, we shall see.


49 replies so far

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conifur

955 posts in 615 days


#1 posted 11-18-2015 06:33 AM

I believe IMHO over kill. If any thing I would go with the arc fault b4 GFIs unless you are standing in water.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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oldnovice

5729 posts in 2831 days


#2 posted 11-18-2015 06:42 AM

I have a 30A receptacle that has a GFCI breaker in the main breaker panel and a disconnect panel in my shop.
I didn’t want a GFCI but code here requires GFCI in any outlet not in the house and all kitchen/bathroom outlets!
He told that my house, built in 1964, needs some updating on the other outdoor outlets, tough to do as all the wiring is two wire without ground!

Originally I had a 40A GFCI but the inspector said it was over rated load and I had to go back to the 30A!
So now I have a 40A GFCI that cost me plenty with no place to use it … if you want/need it’s available for $50, about 1/2 price.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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Tennessee

2410 posts in 1977 days


#3 posted 11-18-2015 12:59 PM

I have standard 20 amp duplex outlets around the shop. No double gang boxes, but I do use UL approved power strips overhead plugged into the 20 amp outlets and the same style power strips on my benches, all with 15 amp breakers built into them. It is a rare day when I pop one of those strip breakers, but nice to know they are there.
No GFCI.

My major tools, like my table saw is on a dedicated 120VAC outlet. Same with my jointer but that stays unplugged most of the time due to space. The 220VAC stuff, planer, air compressor, large bandsaw get dedicated 220VAC outlets. I don’t have enough 220VAC, so I can only plug in two at a time. But as a one person shop, I never run more than say, a bandsaw and a vacuum at the same time, plus lights, (on their own circuit), and a radio. Actually, I need to run another 220VAC circuit since I do have room in my panel so I can stop plugging in stuff when I need it.
I never blow breakers or heat up plugs save sometimes my planer pops its own internal overload if I try to take off too much wood at once. I also have all my outlets either on the wall or on the ceiling. I have low ceilings in my shop allowing me to reach up and plug in say, a ROS. I would rather have the cord going up or away than heading down. Much easier. No up-facing plugs since they gather up wood dust and can short out. Also not a fan of those shops where plugs are on the fronts of benches at waist level. I tend to knock out what is plugged in, which I think is a slight safety issue.

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

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clin

513 posts in 459 days


#4 posted 11-18-2015 03:39 PM

I use common 20 A outlets with 1 GFI upstream on each of the circuits. A GFI on every outlet seems unnecessary to me.

As far as where and how many. On a new wall I built to carve out my shop space from the rest of the garage, I have a row of outlets above workbench height and another row down low. I also have one dedicated 240 V and another 2 gang dedicated 120 V. Probably convert that dedicate 120 V to a 220 V someday to run dust collection.

Already have outlet in ceiling for garage door opener and also use that for room air filter. Added few more outlets to exiting wall with intent to add power strips wherever I feel the need (shop is still in process).

-- Clin

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Jimbo4

1432 posts in 2226 days


#5 posted 11-18-2015 04:36 PM

What ever you get, do not – repeat – do not buy those things that are marked “contractor grade” – pure junk!

-- BOVILEXIA: The urge to moo at cows from a moving vehicle.

View EEngineer's profile

EEngineer

1061 posts in 3076 days


#6 posted 11-18-2015 04:49 PM

Small 1 1/2 car garage shop.

I have 3 X 20A circuits, all chained off of GFI outlets. The GFI outlets are ~1/4 the cost of GFI breakers. NEC requires GFI on all accessible outlets in a garage.

One of those 20A circuits has a timer and USB socket for charging. The timer prevnets overcharging my battery tools.

I have 2 X 15A circuits for lights.

I have one 20A, 220V circuit for an electric heater.

Arc-fault breakers do NOT work reliably yet. This is why they haven’t been required yet. Stay away!

-- "Find out what you cannot do and then go do it!"

View CTWith3's profile

CTWith3

21 posts in 392 days


#7 posted 11-18-2015 06:33 PM

I have my lights, and soon my air cleaner, on a 15A circuit, receptacles on a 20A circuit, and both of my 220V receptacles are dedicated individual circuits.

My shop runs off a sub-panel and I ran out of room so I threw in 2 tandem circuit breakers to make room for my second dedicated 220V circuit.

I read somewhere that the 2014 NEC mandates all receptacles in a garage must be GFCI.

I’m still waiting to get the skinny on long the term application of AFCI.

The guys writing the NEC are killing my wallet.

View PaulHWood's profile

PaulHWood

336 posts in 1716 days


#8 posted 11-18-2015 06:35 PM

I installed a subpanel to augment my outlets:

I have two 220V 20A circuits on one side of my garage (DC and power tool of my choice)

I have an additional 110V 20A circuit on this side as well sent to a GFCI quad box.

I then have a 110V 20A sent to my air filtration unit with a convenience outlet below.

To the other side where my bench and work areas are, I have two 110V 20A circuits, one dedicated to my golf cart charger, and the other split into many convenience outlets along the wall and a pull cord from the ceiling.

I kept the two original circuits which feed one convenience outlet, and my fridge/ chargers with the chargers being GFCI downstream from the fridge.

What I am really missing is more lighting!!!

-- -Paul, South Carolina Structural Engineer by trade, Crappy Woodworker by choice

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HokieKen

1752 posts in 601 days


#9 posted 11-18-2015 07:08 PM



I have my lights, and soon my air cleaner, on a 15A circuit, receptacles on a 20A circuit, and both of my 220V receptacles are dedicated individual circuits.

My shop runs off a sub-panel and I ran out of room so I threw in 2 tandem circuit breakers to make room for my second dedicated 220V circuit.

I read somewhere that the 2014 NEC mandates all receptacles in a garage must be GFCI.

I m still waiting to get the skinny on long the term application of AFCI.

The guys writing the NEC are killing my wallet.

- CTWith3

I know that, at least in VA, the 2012 code (IRC) requires all 125V 15/20A outlets in garages or unfinished spaces to be GFCI. AFCI is required in all bedrooms.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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JoeinGa

7481 posts in 1470 days


#10 posted 11-18-2015 07:30 PM

What do you mean “That’s NOT up to code?”
.
.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

5729 posts in 2831 days


#11 posted 11-18-2015 09:59 PM

CTWith3 , that’s what I found out in California!
Garage outlets = GFCI

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View OggieOglethorpe's profile

OggieOglethorpe

1211 posts in 1573 days


#12 posted 11-18-2015 10:03 PM

It seems that you’re starting from scratch, so simply install a GFCI breaker if that’s what you want or code requires.

Installing GFCI outlets at every point on the same circuit seems like expensive overkill.

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5605 posts in 2695 days


#13 posted 11-18-2015 10:35 PM

Leviton 15 amp Decora outlets for my 110V stuff. I have nothing 20 amp, and no plans for it. Anything that requires that much draw will go to 220v which I have 30 amp sockets for…

Each circuit has a Leviton white GFCI outlet, which is why I went with Decora outlets, keeps the same face plates…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

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TheFridge

5765 posts in 949 days


#14 posted 11-18-2015 10:38 PM

Only one gfi is needed per ckt at the home run. Gfi breakers cost more.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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CTWith3

21 posts in 392 days


#15 posted 11-19-2015 05:20 AM

I’m not starting at scratch per se. My electric was in conduits mounted on the drywall, so I already have the 120V outlets, except for the GFCI I bought at HD the other day.

I have no interest in buying 11 GFCI receptacles, but he NM 12/2 has the manufacturing date of the wiring printed on it and I used the old wire elsewhere in my basement, so the question from an inquisitive official would be why didn’t I use GFCI when remodeled.

About $200 for the 11 GFCIs, the wall plates, and the tax. I could buy some good tools with that money, but if it saves me even once it was worth the money.

Sometimes I hate playing by the rules, and I sleep just fine without AFCI in my bedrooms.

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