LumberJocks

Undersized blades in jointer ok?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by ChiefDJ posted 11-17-2015 08:29 PM 501 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View ChiefDJ's profile

ChiefDJ

3 posts in 388 days


11-17-2015 08:29 PM

Im just getting serious in wood working and so am having to get by with some less than desirable equipment, hence my new-to-me Montgomery Ward powr-kraft THS-2424 jointer that is covered in rust that Im trying to revive after 20+ years neglected in a friends garage without use.

After many weeks of fiddling with it, I finally got the old rusted blades out of it. Besides the rust factor, these blades were a tight fit with no space between the blade and cutterhead. The blades are heald in with 3 set screws per blade. The height is adjusted by two phillips screws under the blade that I tighten or loosen to raise or lower.

I ordered replacment blades from globaltooling.com that I thought would be close to the.right size, but putting them in the slot of the cutterhead, they are much less thick than the old blades, like maybe 1-/16.

My mind tells me that once the set screws are tightened it shouldnt matter, but my desire not to have one of these blades flung into my chest at high velocity has me kind of skittish.

How important is it to get the perfect fitting blade? If I go with these skinnier, shorter blades is there any safety issue to be concerned with?

Though there are part numbers on the old blades a google search of them turned up nothing.


5 replies so far

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1187 days


#1 posted 11-17-2015 09:20 PM

Shorter blades = bad idea, you need all of the retention screws to engage the blade. Thinner shouldn’t matter as much provided you still have good thread engagement with the retention screws so they’re not close to falling out or stripping the threads.

View ChiefDJ's profile

ChiefDJ

3 posts in 388 days


#2 posted 11-17-2015 10:49 PM



Shorter blades = bad idea, you need all of the retention screws to engage the blade. Thinner shouldn t matter as much provided you still have good thread engagement with the retention screws so they re not close to falling out or stripping the threads.

- bigblockyeti

Since I stripped out most of the screws trying to get them out of the cutterhead, I was going to replace them anyway and had thought I would get longer height adjustment screws to make up for the shorter blades. Any reason that wouldn’t work for the height?

As for the thickness, same thing, I have to retap some of the set screw holes because they stripped out inside and I had to drill them out, so I was going to get longer ones to replace, so I dont think length should be an issue.

I just want to make sure relying on the set screws alone without the tension of the right fit would be enough to keep them from flying out with the ridiculous spinning speed this thing does.

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

5183 posts in 2661 days


#3 posted 11-17-2015 11:33 PM

One thing you might could do is get a very thin (about 1/16th thickness) metal strip to make up the difference..Just be sure it’s the same length as the blades,or a tad shorter, and it sits BELOW the height of the sharp edges of the blades….Then you could go back with the same size screws w/o going longer…Just re-tap for the size you need for replacements…..

-- At my age, an "all--nighter" is not having to get up and pee...!!!

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2198 posts in 947 days


#4 posted 11-18-2015 01:14 PM

You’re not gonna have a blade slinging out of the jointer, but I would not use those blades.

My advice is send the blades back and get the correct ones.
Retap all the screw holes and replace any missing/damaged screws with matching originals.
I would use hardened screws, not steel screws.

No way you can have the original blades resharpened?
Don’t worry about rust they will come back from the sharpeners looking like new.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 697 days


#5 posted 11-18-2015 01:35 PM

Dropping 100 at the very most for a new set of knives is much cheaper than an impromptu tracheotomy.

Really, this is not the place to save cash. It would be safer to replace the diamond in your wifes christmas present with cubic zirconium. Dont do that either.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com