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Whittling vs Woodworking

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Forum topic by maxz posted 11-17-2015 08:17 PM 852 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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maxz

3 posts in 390 days


11-17-2015 08:17 PM

Hello I am new to this forum but have taking up the hobby of whittling lately. Does anyone know what is the difference between whittling and woodworking? And is there anyone who prefers whittling over woodworking?


13 replies so far

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

23214 posts in 2334 days


#1 posted 11-17-2015 08:46 PM

I don’t know what is the ‘proper’ way to look at it but I will tell you the way that I would look at it. Whittling is woodworking, carving is woodworking, and chip carving is woodworking. They all require knives or gouges and chisels which need to be sharpened and these tools are then used to cut and fashion wood. I suppose they would be subsets of woodworking. When anybody gets serious about any of these they will probably want to add things like a miter saw and maybe a table saw. Then maybe add a drill press and band saw, etc. Of course they maybe already had this stuff and branched of into these subsets. A couple of other subsets would be scroll sawing and turning wood. A lot of people end up doing it all. It’s all woodworking in my mind. That’s the wonderful thing about woodworking – you can do so many different things with the hobby.

BTW, welcome to Lumberjocks, Max.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

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Johnny01

2 posts in 389 days


#2 posted 11-17-2015 10:43 PM

I would agree with helluvawreck. I consider myself as a whittler since I don’t make elaborate pieces using chisels and mallets but when it comes down to it is really all woodworking. As long as you are having fun and making cool stuff it doesn’t really matter how you classify it.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4247 posts in 1667 days


#3 posted 11-17-2015 10:50 PM

Unless you are whittling something other than wood, you are woodworking (ie: working with wood).

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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maxz

3 posts in 390 days


#4 posted 11-17-2015 10:57 PM

Hey thanks guys for the info. Maybe I will hone my skills “whittling” for now and move up to bigger more intricate projects as I get more comfortable with the craft. Can you recommend any books or websites that would be helpful to gain some basic knowledge?

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Johnny01

2 posts in 389 days


#5 posted 11-17-2015 11:30 PM

I have a book called complete starter guide to whittling which has some pretty cool projects in it a tips for beginners probably can find it on amazon for cheap. Also whittlewise.com is a pretty cool site that breaks down some of the basics. Hope this helps happy whittling!

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maxz

3 posts in 390 days


#6 posted 11-18-2015 02:43 AM

Alright I will check those out. Thanks!

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 954 days


#7 posted 11-18-2015 02:56 AM

Look into chip carving. Very interesting stuff. If you like, look at FancyChip’s projects.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View torpidihummer's profile

torpidihummer

62 posts in 1321 days


#8 posted 11-18-2015 04:20 PM

My enjoyment of wood working started as a little boy making toys or just, sawing and
hammering away on anything I felt practical to play with. Most of us had small pocket
knives, a hammer and a saw. So this ‘love affair’ in wood working has grown and the
purchasing of many ‘wood working toys’ band saws, table saws and an assortment of
many other power tools. Then one day as my wife were on one of our many Travel
Trailer trips, as I enjoyed the view I whittled away on a piece of found wood and was
amazed, as I carved a small bear. Since then I have carved many enjoyable small wild
animals, along with the purchase of any and every wood carving books, along with a
huge assortment of carving tools. I have had a twelve year love affair with carving,
I now specializing carving ‘birds of prey’ with power tools. Bottom line wood
working, whittling, carving all go together.
Oscar

-- Torpidhummer

View ClaudeF's profile

ClaudeF

279 posts in 1175 days


#9 posted 11-19-2015 02:04 AM

Whittling is normally considered a subset of woodworking. Most people think of whittling as some old guys sitting on the porch of the country store making small pointed sticks out of pieces of firewood. In actuality, whittling can produce quite intricate items.

Here are 12 books covering the subject:
http://www.foxchapelpublishing.com/catalogsearch/result/?q=whittling

Claude

-- https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClaudesWoodcarving

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

3341 posts in 2553 days


#10 posted 11-19-2015 09:39 PM

There is one older man in the local woodcarving club that uses a very sharp pocketknife to make carvilngs
that are better than I can make with my carving knives. We are both woodcarvers and woodworkers,
but I would say that his work makes him quite a few steps above me.

-- As ever, Gus-the 77 yr young apprentice carpenter

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2200 posts in 949 days


#11 posted 11-20-2015 11:59 AM

There is a different between working with wood and woodworking.
By some of people’s definition, chopping firewood or demo-ing a stud wall is ww’ing.

Its like saying “microwaving a pizza is cooking?” Don’t ask a chef that question.

But yes, carving, whittling, or any activity that creates something from wood is ww’ing.

Good luck on your venture. There is all kinds of carving.
I took up chip carving a couple years ago and took a class from Wayne Barton.
Its quite relaxing and fun.

I’ll be taking a mallet carving class in a couple weeks looking forward to that, too.

If you ever decide to build furniture, you can embellish with carving to set your work apart.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

23214 posts in 2334 days


#12 posted 11-20-2015 03:30 PM

My brother and I were always in woodworking manufacturing plants and ended up with an architectural molding plant with five Weinig molders. The most workers that we ever had at one time was around 50. Whenever somebody applied for a job we always asked them if they had any woodworking experience. Over the years we always had a number of them say “yes” and when they were asked what experienced they had some would say that they knew how to sharpen a pencil in a pencil sharpener. I always gave these people credit for being resourceful. If you think on it a pencil sharpener is a woodworking machine and in their minds they were woodworkers. ;-|

helluvawreck aka Charle
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View torpidihummer's profile

torpidihummer

62 posts in 1321 days


#13 posted 11-20-2015 04:15 PM

How about just having fun on what and how we carve, I just enjoy working
with wood, adjusting my small work shop so I have enough electrical outlets,
building my carving tables that make my work more comfortable. But most
of all I have put all of my so called ‘wood working’ experience to help me
become a comfortable ‘retiree’ and just enjoy what ever I do.
Oscar

-- Torpidhummer

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