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Making a 220v extension cord for wood working machines

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Forum topic by Holbs posted 11-17-2015 03:10 AM 1383 views 1 time favorited 29 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Holbs

1375 posts in 1493 days


11-17-2015 03:10 AM

Topic tags/keywords: 220v extension cord

With the addition of my refurbished 15” Jet 220v Planer and refurbished 8” GeeTech 220v Jointer, I am now short on 220v receptacles at strategic locations for their respective power cords to reach. I looked at the price tag of something quick at HD or such. Eeeek! They looked fragile, small gauge, too short, and overpriced for just a extension cord. I went about it my own. Price tag…um…er….$20 or $25 ? This is for 15 to 20 amp machines… NOT 30 to 50 amp welders.
Parts:
220v 20 amp receptacle
faceplate for receptacle
3/8” metal box wire clamps (10 in a bag, but only used 1)
220v plug
4 square metal box
mud ring for the metal box
12’ SOOW 10/2 wire (The ‘S’ in SOOW cable means “Service.” For portable cords that begin with an S but are NOT followed by a J, the voltage rating is 600 volts. The ‘OO’ means the cable has oil resistant insulation and jacketing. The ‘W’ means the cable is weather and water resistant.)


-- Yes, my profile picture is of a Carpenter Bee! The name is derived from the Ancient Greek "wood-cutter"


29 replies so far

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

3686 posts in 1730 days


#1 posted 11-17-2015 03:31 AM

The guy who had previously owned my table saw used a metal box for a splice to a longer cord. I was always tripping over it and finally had enough. I basically made an extension cord and thru the box. It’s much more user friendly now. I’ve found it to be a great safety enhancement when changing blades. I can unplug the cords and hang them over the front fence rail in plan sight.

View clin's profile

clin

513 posts in 460 days


#2 posted 11-17-2015 03:37 AM

Why the box and outlet, and not just the female cord connector?

-- Clin

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Holbs

1375 posts in 1493 days


#3 posted 11-17-2015 03:41 AM

hmm…female cord connector… yep, that would work as well. It just feels… safer to have this electrical connection off the ground. Maybe it’s just me :)

-- Yes, my profile picture is of a Carpenter Bee! The name is derived from the Ancient Greek "wood-cutter"

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Julian

1037 posts in 2155 days


#4 posted 11-17-2015 03:49 AM

Keeping the power cord connection off the floor is a good idea. Another option is to make the machine cords longer to reach the wall plug. That’s what I did for 2 machines(240V) that I have. Didn’t like having to deal with an extension cord.

-- Julian

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Holbs

1375 posts in 1493 days


#5 posted 11-17-2015 03:51 AM

Come spring, I will be adding 2 or 3 more 220v circuits (and some more 110v). This is a handy temporary solution.

-- Yes, my profile picture is of a Carpenter Bee! The name is derived from the Ancient Greek "wood-cutter"

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4226 posts in 1663 days


#6 posted 11-17-2015 04:08 AM

When I rewired my TS, I put on a 25 foot service cord for that reason (12/3 SOOW). Although, I also have a 30 foot extension cord that I made for my welder (6/3 for 240V@50 amp capacity), which I was using prior to that. For the extension cord, I just used a standard 6-50P plug end and 6-50R self contained outlet box.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3941 posts in 1957 days


#7 posted 11-17-2015 12:19 PM

This might not have helped in your situation, but keep these 240V duplex outlets in mind to add outlets. These are really handy at times.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View OggieOglethorpe's profile

OggieOglethorpe

1212 posts in 1574 days


#8 posted 11-17-2015 01:49 PM

hmm…female cord connector… yep, that would work as well. It just feels… safer to have this electrical connection off the ground.

I’d rather touch a plastic female connector than a metal box. In use, the knockouts on boxes like that tend to get loose and even fall out, or worse, in…

FWIW, male to female connections with proper connectors mid-line are pretty standard in the entertainment industry.

View Kazooman's profile (online now)

Kazooman

628 posts in 1416 days


#9 posted 11-17-2015 01:56 PM

I agree with Julian. I would just put a longer cord on the machine. Save the original and when you add more outlets you can go back to the shorter cord.

View WoodNSawdust's profile

WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 641 days


#10 posted 11-17-2015 02:23 PM

With the last electrical expansion to the shop I talked with the electrician about additional 240V outlets and he suggested the extension cord option. He did advise to remove the extension cord and hide it for any electrical inspections.

I believe that this the female connector I used (assuming that I actually had make an extension cord ;-))

The longer a length of wire the more voltage drop and possible heating so I did use a 30 amp connectors and wire. I used a 20A breaker.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

614 posts in 1025 days


#11 posted 11-17-2015 03:55 PM

Holbs, you did ground the metal outlet box…. right?

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Holbs

1375 posts in 1493 days


#12 posted 11-17-2015 04:14 PM

Yes I did, WhyMe. Most will say since the yoke of the device (receptacle) is in direct contact with the metal box, a bond is not required. However, it costs 0.02 cents to play it safe and cover all bases. .I went this route:

-- Yes, my profile picture is of a Carpenter Bee! The name is derived from the Ancient Greek "wood-cutter"

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

693 posts in 688 days


#13 posted 11-17-2015 04:16 PM

If you did it like that, then the ground is exposed to contact.
If I was going to go the route of a metal box as an extension, I would wire the ground from the cable directly to the ground on the plug.

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WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 641 days


#14 posted 11-17-2015 04:24 PM

Holb’s picture (above) is for 120V not 240V.

If you are running 3 conductor (2 hot wires + 1 return) 240V I am with AZWoody that I would not want the box connected to any of the 3 wires.

If you are running 4 conductor (2 hot wires + 1 return + 1 ground) 240V then the ground should be connected to the metal box.

I prefer what is designated 10-3 w/ground (4 conductor). If the particular machine calls for a plug wired with only 3 conductors I can always not connect anything to the 4th terminal (like my Grizzly bandsaw). But if I hit a machine that wants all 4 conductors I already have them present.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

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Holbs

1375 posts in 1493 days


#15 posted 11-17-2015 04:32 PM

I believe the whole point of grounding the box is that incase a wire becomes loose and touches the box, the box becomes part of the circuit. When you touch the box at that point, you become part of circuit too. With it grounded, I am actually unsure what happens. Never touched a ground wire on a live circuit to test :) But safety and code says to ground metal boxes for a purpose.
Yep..that is 110v. Only shown for illustrating purposes only. Here is 220v:

-- Yes, my profile picture is of a Carpenter Bee! The name is derived from the Ancient Greek "wood-cutter"

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