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Forum topic by whopua posted 11-16-2015 08:28 PM 505 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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whopua

5 posts in 661 days


11-16-2015 08:28 PM

Topic tags/keywords: novice

Really new to all of this. So far have made a platform bed and a blanket ladder for family. I want to make this trash can holder for my sister but I don’t understand how to make the cuts in the base of this. Does anyone have a link or a basic explanation on the tools or whatever I would need to make these angels and arcs accurate? I will include a pic. I really appreciate the help!!


8 replies so far

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bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2529 days


#1 posted 11-16-2015 08:55 PM

There are many ways to skin this cat. I usually make patterns. In this case a half pattern. I make a blanket chest that has this style. I like to make my patterns out of hard board so I can save them on a nail and reuse them or pieces of them. Say your base in this case is 2.5” or even 3” x 32 (lenght is not important). I create a half pattern and mark it on the left side then flip it over on the center to have a mirror image on the right side trace and cut on a band saw, or hand saw. Or you could take one board rip it at 1.5” and create the curve and glue it back on and the grain lines will batch and no will notice you ripped it.

To create the curve go buy you a cheap set of french curves from a craft store and play with it. You will find it’s symetry that matters, and if you make the curve on the left and flip it over to the opposite side it will be identical.

Now if you want percision sketchup is the way to go, but thats a whole other discussion.

I’ve started with the bottom of a paint can, or soda bottle or coffee can to get it started and just gone from there.

Refine your curve till it looks good to the eye, and it will be great.

Another method is using a thin strip to make the curves.

https://youtu.be/GOepV5aje-Y

Good luck and practice on scrap. I love the patterns though so I don’t reinvent the wheel every time.

This foot began as a circle

https://flic.kr/p/oeqDxo

Here’s a link to an ogee foot pattern I created when I could not find one on the internet that met my needs. Played with angles and circles till it got cleaned up and followed the above steps.

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/62242

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1831 days


#2 posted 11-16-2015 09:18 PM

I second making a pattern. For that, I’d probably just make a pattern of the curved piece out of 1/4” ply or hardboard, with reference marks on the pattern to help align it to the marks you’ll have made for your straight cuts.

However, I’ve done cuts like that before, and you can use things you have on hand as your pattern. I’ve drawn out the straight pieces, then use various things to trace my curves…things like the bottom of spray paint cans, rolls of tape, etc. Sometimes the exact arc doesn’t matter, and I’ll find something round and hold it on and trace it, and it turns out well.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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HokieKen

1744 posts in 600 days


#3 posted 11-16-2015 09:53 PM

You have a CAD drawing unless that’s someone else’s in the OP. I’d print that out to scale and attach it to the wood with spray adhesive. Cut close to the lines with your bandsaw/jigsaw then sand it down to the lines. That’s how I’d do it if I was making 1 piece 1 time.

If I was making more than 1, I’d make a pattern like the guys above suggested and use a pattern bit in the router to make identical pieces.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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whopua

5 posts in 661 days


#4 posted 11-18-2015 09:01 PM

Guys I really appreciate the replies. I’m going to give it a go this weekend using the advice here. Thanks for being kind to a newbie. I’ll be back with more questions and gratitude on future projects!

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1831 days


#5 posted 11-19-2015 02:08 PM

Last night I was laying out the curves on the headboard and footboard for my daughter’s American Girl doll bed. I ended up using the lid to the 30-gallon trash can to trace the curve. It’s actually the first time that lid has been used for anything, since I never put it on the can.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View XquietflyX's profile

XquietflyX

289 posts in 422 days


#6 posted 11-19-2015 02:42 PM

I thought i was the only one to use a trash can lid to make a repeatable curve…., and a soaker hose, and welding wire, and….. et al naseum :)


Last night I was laying out the curves on the headboard and footboard for my daughter s American Girl doll bed. I ended up using the lid to the 30-gallon trash can to trace the curve. It s actually the first time that lid has been used for anything, since I never put it on the can.

- BinghamtonEd


-- You can tell a lot about your wife by her hands, for example if they are around your throat she's prolly pissed off at you...

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TheFridge

5765 posts in 948 days


#7 posted 11-19-2015 02:44 PM

Or cove cut on a table saw

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Daruc's profile

Daruc

459 posts in 594 days


#8 posted 11-19-2015 02:49 PM

Draw it out on your board and cut it with a jig saw.

For the record I have quart radius, gallon radius, rolls of tape radius, jar radius, router base radius, and then if all else fails I use a compass.

-- -

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