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When cutting resenous wood?????

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Forum topic by Bill White posted 11-16-2015 03:17 PM 590 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Bill White

4749 posts in 3715 days


11-16-2015 03:17 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I sometimes cut and turn heart pine. Old, hard, and full of pitch. This covers blades, guides (bandsaw), and tires with pitch that is a bear to remove. Cleaning the blades on the TS is no prob, but removing the BS blade, cleaning the guide bearings and tires can be a job.
I’ve thought about using some sort of pretreatment on the blades. Saw Blade Lubricant sticks, Pam, anything?
What say you folks?
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us


7 replies so far

View alittleoff's profile

alittleoff

413 posts in 1031 days


#1 posted 11-16-2015 03:31 PM

I’ll be happy if you get a solution to this problem. I love rich pine lumber as I call it. I just finished a toy box for my grandson made with pine. When I finished I threw the band saw blade away. I don’t think it’s any way to save them after making even a few cuts. I’ll never run a peice of it through my planer again. It took me about a day to clean it. On my table saw I used mineral spirits I believe to clean the blade.
Gerald

View crank49's profile

crank49

4016 posts in 2725 days


#2 posted 11-16-2015 05:00 PM

When I cut Osage Orange, a very hard resinous wood I sometimes wipe the blade with kerosene first. Keeps it from gumming up. YMMV.

View distrbd's profile

distrbd

2252 posts in 2201 days


#3 posted 11-16-2015 05:16 PM

Bill, Try Washing Soda(not baking soda), you won’t regret it, I would fold the blade in a small diameter so in can fit in the of a bucket (or a pan 2” or so deep), then add warm water mixed with 2 tablespoons of Washing soda , enough to cover the blade, let it sit for a few minutes and then use a soft bristle toothbrush to remove whatever is still left on the blade, it’ll work like a charm.

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4749 posts in 3715 days


#4 posted 11-16-2015 06:25 PM

Yep! I’m a BIG advocate of washing soda. Does a great job of cleaning all my blades. I was hoping for a method or compound that might help keeping the “gunk” from building up while the blades are in use.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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distrbd

2252 posts in 2201 days


#5 posted 11-16-2015 06:38 PM


Yep! I m a BIG advocate of washing soda. Does a great job of cleaning all my blades. I was hoping for a method or compound that might help keeping the “gunk” from building up while the blades are in use.
Bill

- Bill White


Sorry Bill, I read your post again and just realised you were in fact looking for a method in order to avoid the build up in the fist place, I have tried all sorts of compounds including the lubricant stick, WD -40, auto wax,etc. but nothing seem to work ,the build up comes back after a few minutes of use.
I use a spray called “Goof off 2” on the rubber tires to remove the gunk and it cleans them well , it says on the bottle that it’s safe on rubber/plastic.
just a new product I thought might help, but does not help to prevent the build up.

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

View Julian's profile

Julian

1204 posts in 2445 days


#6 posted 11-16-2015 06:45 PM

PTFE or Teflon spray might be worth a try. Have not tried it on a band saw blade but I use PTFE spray on cast iron surfaces. It keeps the cast iron slick and does not leave a sticky residue like some sprays. The trick would be to get enough spray on each gullet and tooth.

-- Julian

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

4113 posts in 893 days


#7 posted 11-16-2015 06:59 PM

I wonder if “Goo Gone” or some other adhesive remover might work? Seems like since the problem is pitch adhering to the metal that wiping it down with that ahead of the cutting might not keep it from clogging the gullets but might make it so a quick wipe down is all that would be required to remove it.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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