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Resawing on a band saw

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Forum topic by wolfgrl posted 11-12-2015 09:30 PM 864 views 2 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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wolfgrl

2 posts in 2544 days


11-12-2015 09:30 PM

When resawing on a delta 14” bandsaw, the blade tends to drift (even with a fence) and has a hard time cutting taller material (like 8” high). When I saw, I typically use a 1/2” x 4 TPI blade with cool blocks as the blade guide. Has anyone purchased the carter bandsaw guide set (approx. $180 worth) and does it work better than the original guides that come with the machine. Or is there something else I should be doing to get better resawing results. FYI, I turn up the tension on the blade while cutting.


15 replies so far

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

8262 posts in 2896 days


#1 posted 11-12-2015 09:37 PM

The Carter guide system is worth every penny!

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4244 posts in 1666 days


#2 posted 11-12-2015 09:45 PM

Best guides are the HSS ones that shipped with the saw. Drift indicates improper setup.
Obligatory Bandsaw tune-up video:

Band Saw Clinic with Alex Snodgrass

Cool blocks are, IMHO, a waste of money (as are roller guides)... but if you want to see a comparison between them (and the ‘heat’ issue so many people cite as their reason for getting them), check out this review over at the Woodworkers Gazette: 14-inch bandsaw guide review

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

6578 posts in 1617 days


#3 posted 11-12-2015 09:46 PM

Set up the bandsaw as per the band saw clinic video MrUnix posted. Then, if it still drifts, get a new blade because that one is dull.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2417 posts in 2389 days


#4 posted 11-12-2015 10:24 PM

Yes it is the blade!


Set up the bandsaw as per the band saw clinic video MrUnix posted. Then, if it still drifts, get a new blade because that one is dull.

- jmartel


-- "You may have your PHD but I have my GED and my DD 214"

View joey502's profile

joey502

487 posts in 985 days


#5 posted 11-12-2015 10:45 PM

When you replace the blade try a 3/4” 3tpi, if you saw will take it a 1” width. That will help to.

The drift is caused by a dull blade and/or the gullet of the teeth not being able to remove saw dust quickly enough.

Try a slower feed rate as well. The chips will clear faster at a slower feed.

I have an underpowered 12” craftsman saw, I am able to resaw at capacity very accurately. Slowly but accurately.

View blackcherry's profile

blackcherry

3316 posts in 3290 days


#6 posted 11-13-2015 02:34 AM

Before you go out and buy the Carter system which I have and buy a larger 3/4 blade, take a good hard look at your tires. I bought a new Grizzly BS and had a drifting problem years back. So I up graded to new blade and guide and still the same problem. Purchase a new set of poly. tires and have been resawing for a few years with no problems. Sorry tires are like hydro planing on water just my two cents best wishes…Blackcherry PS 3/4 blade are to wide for a 14” BS

View ForestGrl's profile

ForestGrl

445 posts in 553 days


#7 posted 11-13-2015 06:10 AM

Ditto to the “complete tune-up” advice (including where the blade rides on the tire). Guides of any kind won’t totally fix a drifting problem (and the fence is never expected to make a piece of wood travel straight—advice used to be, if the wood simply would not travel straight, you’d set your fence to the angle of drift. Seems now we’re beyond that for the most part). Eight inch resaw is probably pushing it for that saw (I have a Grizzly 14”). Cutting out an 8” bowl blank, or crosscutting 8”, not so bad. Not sure I’d ask mine to do a good resaw at that height though.

Getting a 1” blade might not be the best idea for a 14” saw, at least I’ve seen a couple people advise not to. More important to get the saw tuned up and cutting correctly, and use the right blade for the job—tpi, tooth set, etc.

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

View hairy's profile

hairy

2384 posts in 2999 days


#8 posted 11-13-2015 12:51 PM

I usually start my resaw on the table saw. Make a cut, flip end for end,keep the same edge against the fence and cut. Raise the blade between cuts and repeat. Don’t cut completely through on the tablesaw. Final cut on the bandsaw.

That leaves some clean up to do on the insides of the pieces, but gets me the size I want.

-- stay thirsty my friends...

View WoodNSawdust's profile

WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 644 days


#9 posted 11-13-2015 01:04 PM

I started woodworking with the Craftsman 12 bs. I tried the steel guides that came with it, then upgraded to cool blocks and finally moved to the Carter guide system. For my saw the Carter guides were the best at eliminating drift.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

View wolfgrl's profile

wolfgrl

2 posts in 2544 days


#10 posted 11-13-2015 03:34 PM

Thanks for all of the advice. The Carter bandsaw setup video was very helpful.

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

6578 posts in 1617 days


#11 posted 11-13-2015 03:53 PM


Eight inch resaw is probably pushing it for that saw (I have a Grizzly 14”). Cutting out an 8” bowl blank, or crosscutting 8”, not so bad. Not sure I d ask mine to do a good resaw at that height though.

Getting a 1” blade might not be the best idea for a 14” saw, at least I ve seen a couple people advise not to. More important to get the saw tuned up and cutting correctly, and use the right blade for the job—tpi, tooth set, etc.

- ForestGrl

The grizzly 14” saw with a riser block does it just fine. I resawed some 11” wide stuff and peeled off 1/16” thick slices off of it like it was nothing. It’s all in the setup and feed rate.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View ForestGrl's profile

ForestGrl

445 posts in 553 days


#12 posted 11-13-2015 04:35 PM


Eight inch resaw is probably pushing it for that saw (I have a Grizzly 14”). Cutting out an 8” bowl blank, or crosscutting 8”, not so bad. Not sure I d ask mine to do a good resaw at that height though.

Getting a 1” blade might not be the best idea for a 14” saw, at least I ve seen a couple people advise not to. More important to get the saw tuned up and cutting correctly, and use the right blade for the job—tpi, tooth set, etc.

- ForestGrl

The grizzly 14” saw with a riser block does it just fine. I resawed some 11” wide stuff and peeled off 1/16” thick slices off of it like it was nothing. It s all in the setup and feed rate.

- jmartel

Hardwood? I’m shopping for blades right now. What specific blade are you using?

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

6578 posts in 1617 days


#13 posted 11-13-2015 05:07 PM

I’ve done it with 2 blades so far. Walnut and Maple as well. The Woodslicer blade is my favorite between that and Olsen. 1/2” blades as a 14” saw can’t really tension a 3/4” blade properly.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1646 posts in 1784 days


#14 posted 11-13-2015 05:17 PM

Improper setup and improper blade. You want at least 3tpi for that sort of resawing. Skip tooth configuration is good. I’m using the Michael Fortune method of tune up which can be found in a Fine Woodworking article. It’s probably similar to the Snodgrass method (But Michael Fortune won’t try selling you on a useless Carter guide system and tells you how to use square guides).

Avoid the Carter system. It’s a waste of money since it won’t do anything that conventional guides can’t do and roller bearings are a royal pain to use as guides. They have to be kept clean and lubricated and even then they will still need replacing over time since they’ll seize sooner or later. That means keeping spares on hand or risking downtime during an important project. Bearings and pitch are a bad combination.

Ordinary, square guide blocks are setup once and they’ll work forever. Worst case scenario is that they get damaged when a blade breaks or binds up during a cut and that just requires a minute touching up the guides on the sander.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View ForestGrl's profile

ForestGrl

445 posts in 553 days


#15 posted 11-14-2015 03:27 AM



I ve done it with 2 blades so far. Walnut and Maple as well. The Woodslicer blade is my favorite between that and Olsen. 1/2” blades as a 14” saw can t really tension a 3/4” blade properly.

- jmartel

These days, I cut more green wood than kiln-dry, so it looks like the Woodslicer isn’t appropriate. One of the grumbles I have about these band saw blade threads is the lack of specifics in recommendations. The width and tpi of a blade aren’t the whole story. “Woodslicer” is very specific, because it’s the name of a particular design (3/4 variable tooth pitch, .022 thickness, minimal tooth set, blah blah). On the other hand, recommendations for a “1/2” Timberwolf” or “1/2” Olsen” are less than helpful. If only I’d think about these things during the day when I could call the blade seller/maker and ask what they recommend. I’ve long lost the joy of plowing through pages of specifications to figure out what would work best.

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

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