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Forum topic by MashMaster posted 11-12-2015 03:56 AM 523 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MashMaster

116 posts in 2125 days


11-12-2015 03:56 AM

I have finally moved beyond milling the wood for my kitchen table. I have the outside frame now dry fitted but I know I need to put in one or two support crossbars. I’m a bit stumped about the best way to add them. Maybe face glue supports on the inside of the frame and support cross beams. like a 3×1x4 piece with a notch cut out to support the cross bar. And face glue that to the inner frame. That make sense? any suggestions for a better plan?

The frame is about 3’ x 6’

-- - Dave ; Austin, TX


9 replies so far

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bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2532 days


#1 posted 11-12-2015 02:44 PM

Well if you don’t want outward visibility on the outside of the table apron, I’d do sliding dovetail or stopped sliding dovetail.

If thats not a big deal, a method I use is to use a mortise chisel, on a 45 angle to create a diamond and then screw it to the sides and plug the hole with a contrasting wood. It makes a nice design feature.

There are many ways to skin that cat.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

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JeremiahD

5 posts in 401 days


#2 posted 11-12-2015 03:38 PM

Wow. That’s nice looking already. I just hand planed my walnut tabletop. Looking at starting the base tonight. Mine is 2.5×4ft, due to small living conditions. Spend all my money on wood and tools, not sqft in my apartment! Ha.

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JeremiahD

5 posts in 401 days


#3 posted 11-12-2015 03:39 PM

I’m now just trying to decide how/what I want to do for base. Prob legs won’t be as sexy as yours.

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rwe2156

2198 posts in 946 days


#4 posted 11-12-2015 03:43 PM

What bones said.

If you’re not opposed, even a simple L bracket will work.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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jdh122

879 posts in 2283 days


#5 posted 11-12-2015 03:57 PM

I’ve generally used dowels for that joint. Generally for joinery I prefer to use other joints than dowels, but they’re perfect for this application, I think.
I think one cross support will be enough.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

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MashMaster

116 posts in 2125 days


#6 posted 11-12-2015 04:43 PM

Thanks for the compliments. I can’t take credit for the legs though, I purchased them through mail order because I don’t have a lathe.

I like the idea of the stopped sliding dovetails, it does make me a bit nervous since I have never done them before so I may chicken out and do dowels.

How hard is it to do a sliding dovetail in the middle of a long board?

I was thinking is 2 cross bars, one every 2 feet.

-- - Dave ; Austin, TX

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bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2532 days


#7 posted 11-12-2015 05:10 PM



Thanks for the compliments. I can t take credit for the legs though, I purchased them through mail order because I don t have a lathe.

I like the idea of the stopped sliding dovetails, it does make me a bit nervous since I have never done them before so I may chicken out and do dowels.

How hard is it to do a sliding dovetail in the middle of a long board?

I was thinking is 2 cross bars, one every 2 feet.

- MashMaster

Dive in, get some cheap poplar to practice on. If you have a router table cut the dovetail in the side first. Then put the dovetail bit in your table and take a pass against one side of the crossmember, and flip it and do the other side. Keep exposing a tiny bit of the bit and repeat proceedure. Test fit and once its snug your there. I’ve got the incra fence so i can adjust my fence by the thou. As Charles Neil says “sneak up on it”

Practice on some poplar then do the real thing. TNT (TaintNuttinToit)

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

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MashMaster

116 posts in 2125 days


#8 posted 11-13-2015 01:49 PM

Questions:
  • If I go with the sliding dovetails, how deep should I go? The apron is 1” thick, so I was thinking 3/8”
  • How much will that weaken the apron?
  • Should I make 45 degree angle pieces in each corner connected to the adjacent aprons to help for support and maintain the 90 degree angles?

-- - Dave ; Austin, TX

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MashMaster

116 posts in 2125 days


#9 posted 11-15-2015 08:28 PM

Questions:
  • If I go with the sliding dovetails, how deep should I go? The apron is 1” thick, so I was thinking 3/8”
  • How much will that weaken the apron?
  • Should I make 45 degree angle pieces in each corner connected to the adjacent aprons to help for support and maintain the 90 degree angles?

-- - Dave ; Austin, TX

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