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1/4" bit to use in trim Router or 1/2" in full sized router?

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Forum topic by BigMig posted 11-11-2015 07:38 PM 693 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BigMig

385 posts in 2075 days


11-11-2015 07:38 PM

Topic tags/keywords: router bit shank trim router chamfer

Friends,
I’ve given up on chamfering using an old (and cheap- long ago) 45 degree chamfer bit. It burns despite being cleaned and the bearing lubricated. I use it to soften the edges of tabletops, legs, etc because I can’t get a uniform chamfer using a block plane.

So, I’d like to get a new chamfer bit but I have trouble deciding: should I get a 1/4” bit and use it in my little DeWalt trim router – and take advantage of the easy handling, etc? Or a 1/2” shank bit so I could use it freehand as well as in my 2 hp Porter Cable router – thereby allowing use in the router table?

Lastly – which brand: Rockler? Freud? Infinity? CMT?

Help a brother out, please.

Thanks

-- Mike from Lansdowne, PA


15 replies so far

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7172 posts in 2039 days


#1 posted 11-11-2015 07:55 PM

I’d use a 1/2” shank router bit by Whiteside from Carbide Processors, there’s a 3 bit combo
on sale for 80.00 USD.

http://www.carbideprocessors.com/3-piece-chamfer-bit-set-1-2-shank-whiteside-445/

Whiteside 2305- 1/2” Shank, Carbide Tipped -45 Degree Angle, 5/8” Cutting Length, 7/16” Cutting Height, 2-1/4” Overall Length (Bearing B3)

Whiteside 2306- 1/2” Shank, Carbide Tipped -45 Degree Angle, 1-1/16” Cutting Length, 3/4” Cutting Height, 2-1/2” Overall Length (Bearing B3)

Whiteside 2307- 1/2” Shank, Carbide Tipped -(8 Sided Boxes) 22-1/2 Degree Angle, 15/16” Cutting Length, 7/8” Cutting Height, 2-3/4” Overall Length

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

1744 posts in 600 days


#2 posted 11-11-2015 08:11 PM

It depends on how much your “softening” the edge. If it’s a light cut just to get rid of the sharp corner, a 1/4” shank should be fine. Of course, 1/2” shank will never hurt anything and is recommended if you’re taking substantial cuts. If you want a single bit, go with the 1/2” so you can use it for most anything.

I’ve developed a liking for Yonico bits. Amazon has this set at a great price. If you just want the 45, they have it too. If you’re using this hard and often, go with the whiteside waho recommended above. If you just use it on occasion, the Yonico is a solid choice at a fraction of the cost.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2190 posts in 942 days


#3 posted 11-11-2015 08:38 PM

What he ^ said

Mike, I now do almost all my chamfers with a hand plane.
The big advantage is you will always be able to go with the grain to eliminate tear out (can’t do that with a router). As a result, you will get a much cleaner, sharper surface that I think looks better.

Plus, its quieter, dustless, eye protection-less, no fiddling, no burning, no tearout (did I say no tear out?).
Lastly, its downright therapeutic (especially when pausing to sip an ice cold Heineken)!!

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View BigMig's profile

BigMig

385 posts in 2075 days


#4 posted 11-11-2015 08:49 PM

You know, as I was writing the question, I thought “some LJers will suggest hand planing.” But I’m not so confident with my block plane. Perhaps my low angle jack? Better control and more comfortable two-handed operation?
Thanks all for responses…keep em coming, please

-- Mike from Lansdowne, PA

View Andre's profile

Andre

1022 posts in 1268 days


#5 posted 11-11-2015 09:18 PM

I use a L.N. Brass 102 usually but just picked up the L.V. Apron plane with the PMV-11 blade, these blades stay sharp forever! Anytime I use a router it is always a Ryobi cordless trimmer with a Freud 1/4” shank round over bit, no cord can get almost everywhere and more than enough power for taking the sharp edges of.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

806 posts in 2311 days


#6 posted 11-11-2015 10:58 PM

I really like my little Dewalt router, and for an edge bit that might get used more often taking the tool to the wood as opposed to taking the wood to the router, I’d go with the 1/4” as was said above chamfer does not really take a lot of load to the bit. Of course I’ve also got an adapter for my 3hp PC to run the 1/4” so it be a no worries purchase.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View Richard H's profile

Richard H

489 posts in 1142 days


#7 posted 11-11-2015 11:20 PM

For light work using small bits I reach for my little Dewalt way more often than a bigger router. It’s super light weight and the LED light is a feature I have no idea why it isn’t included in bigger models. The key is light duty tasks like small 1/4” round overs are perfect for this router.

Don’t you have a 1/4” collet for your router table router?

As for brand I have been very happy with Whiteside of late.

View joey502's profile

joey502

487 posts in 980 days


#8 posted 11-11-2015 11:30 PM

I use a whiteside 1/4” shank in my Dewalt 611 for breaking edges. I really like the whiteside bits.

View BigMig's profile

BigMig

385 posts in 2075 days


#9 posted 11-12-2015 12:35 PM

I KNEW you guys would have great ideas…

  • I do have a 1/4 to 1/2 collet for the big router; I just worry that the 1/4 bit isn’t as stable as the 1/2 bit
  • My latest project was a coffee table with an elliptical top of about 54” in length, so I would rather take the router to the work as opposed to the converse – so the small router worked better – Like Richard H Question for RWE2156 – what style of handplane do you use when knocking off edges? block? big/little? How to you keep a consistent angle (I know…practice, practice…) Nobody seems to disagree with Whiteside for quality…

Thanks, team!

-- Mike from Lansdowne, PA

View CB_Cohick's profile

CB_Cohick

460 posts in 713 days


#10 posted 11-12-2015 01:09 PM

You should get one of each, 1/4 and 1/2, Whiteside, and then a plane for when the neander bug bites hard.

-- Chris - Would work, but I'm too busy reading about woodwork.

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

826 posts in 1192 days


#11 posted 11-12-2015 01:56 PM


What he ^ said

Mike, I now do almost all my chamfers with a hand plane.
The big advantage is you will always be able to go with the grain to eliminate tear out (can t do that with a router). As a result, you will get a much cleaner, sharper surface that I think looks better.

Plus, its quieter, dustless, eye protection-less, no fiddling, no burning, no tearout (did I say no tear out?).
Lastly, its downright therapeutic (especially when pausing to sip an ice cold Heineken)!!

- rwe2156

C’mon rwe, you’re setting a bad example for the noobs. Safety, safety, safety.. LOL

bigmig, a router that you can handle easier is much better for chamfering as long as it’s a light cut. Trim routers were designed for mostly laminate work, trimming laminate at possibly .060” at the most. Back cutting first and then cutting the forward direction will eliminate most tear out.

If ya cain’t plug it in, it ain’t worth usin. hehe…...... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

View Richard H's profile

Richard H

489 posts in 1142 days


#12 posted 11-12-2015 02:09 PM

BigMig,

My opinion is it’s hard to beat the older Stanley 60 1/2 block planes. It’s well sized for those kinds of light duty work, the low angle excels at cutting the end grain part of the round over and it’s light weight makes it easy to use for extended amounts of time. Lie Nielsen has a very nice reproduction but I have used it at shows a few times and always came away feeling like it was a bit heavy and bulkier than the old Stanleys.

As for technique it is practice but a couple things that might help. You can put pencil marks as references on both faces to give you a guide to follow than aim just short of those rotating the plane over the edge making smaller and smaller facets as you go. The plane can’t cut a curve only progressively finer flats that at some point resemble a curve. Also don’t sweat it to much. Get it close than a light pass with sandpaper or a scraper evens it all out.

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

3663 posts in 1727 days


#13 posted 11-12-2015 04:09 PM

CB’s right, get them both from Whiteside.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4853 posts in 2275 days


#14 posted 11-12-2015 05:05 PM

I use roundover and chamfer bits on the router table as well as freehand routing. Ideally you would get a bit that could be used in both applications.

I have had good luck with Whiteside, Amana, Freud and Rockler bits.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View OggieOglethorpe's profile

OggieOglethorpe

1211 posts in 1572 days


#15 posted 11-12-2015 07:49 PM

I love small routers for small chamfering and roundovers… I keep an older Bosch trim router dedicated to a small roundover for shop appliances. This is a great use for older laminate trimmers and cheapies, like Grizzly or HF trimmers. You don’t need, or even want, a 1/2” router for a 1/16” or 1/8” roundover or chamfer.

I like Whiteside, CMT, Freud, pretty much all the same in this class. For big bits, Whiteside is my first choice, but here it’s less important, as long as you stick with the better brands.

BTW… I have many, many, hand planes and love to use them, but suggesting hand planes to a guy specifically asking about router bits is kind of lame…

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