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Forum topic by bill48 posted 12-21-2009 05:27 PM 1121 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bill48

9 posts in 2643 days


12-21-2009 05:27 PM

I am completing a project that calls for oak plywood edged with solid oak. I know the edging is red oak and the plywood looks like it may be white oak. I need some suggestions for staining, hopefully, so that both types of wood look relatively even. Help, please.


8 replies so far

View GMman's profile

GMman

3902 posts in 3157 days


#1 posted 12-21-2009 06:57 PM

Try it 1st on left over pieces.

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4224 posts in 3194 days


#2 posted 12-21-2009 07:19 PM

bill48,
check out my roll top desk in my projects. It was made from a combination of oak veneered plywood, miscellaneous species of oak, and commercially made oak bullnose. The oak lumber came from perhaps a dozen different sources. Though the camera picked up a few different hues, in person the desk all matches quite well, with nothing more than Minwax Red Oak stain and a few sanded coats of clear gloss polyurethane. It’s more a challenge of matching boards all cut the same way on the saw, quarter-sawn oak tends to absorb stain differently than flat-sawn in my opinion, but staining does tend to even out the variations in wood color.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View bill48's profile

bill48

9 posts in 2643 days


#3 posted 12-21-2009 09:31 PM

You wouldn’t suggest a sealer first?

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4224 posts in 3194 days


#4 posted 12-21-2009 11:33 PM

I never use sealer on oak, bill48! Although sometimes I’ll fill the pores first with one of those heavy-bodied products, but it makes the adsorption into the pores a bit uneven. I ‘ll use it only when there is a need for an absolute glassy surface. On birch, maple or cherry, yes, a sealer is mandatory due to the blotchyness that sometimes results.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View bill48's profile

bill48

9 posts in 2643 days


#5 posted 12-21-2009 11:35 PM

Thanks much for your help.

bill48

View Scott Bryan's profile

Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 3282 days


#6 posted 12-22-2009 05:25 AM

Bill, I agree with poopiekat. Oak takes stain well so a sealer is not necessary. I generally use a sealer after the stain has cured. For a sealer I generally use 1# shellac over oil base stains. Otherwise the stain may bleed into the topcoat.

I seal only raw woods such as birch, pine and poplar which will blotch badly if not sealed prior to staining.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

View bill48's profile

bill48

9 posts in 2643 days


#7 posted 12-22-2009 07:35 PM

I appreciate all of the input and replys.

bill48

View NathanAllen's profile

NathanAllen

376 posts in 2604 days


#8 posted 12-23-2009 12:20 AM

Oak is extremely easy to stain, but the plywood will accept less color, so perfectly matching the solid and the ply will present a small challenge.

Work the plywood section to the color density you want first then work on the solid. Whether you use tape or have a very steady hand it shouldn’t matter, there is a lot of margin for error, just something to be a little careful about.

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