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Tendon shims or fixes

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Forum topic by Partridge posted 12-21-2009 07:43 AM 3966 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Partridge

296 posts in 3421 days


12-21-2009 07:43 AM

Topic tags/keywords: trick tip

I am builbing a stickly in table and I have some tendons that got a little lose. is there a shimming proses or a fix
i have spent a lot of time on this and i need to get a finish on it for Christmas. I will have pics after done.
thank you.

-- I get out in the shop when I can


12 replies so far

View JAGWAH's profile

JAGWAH

929 posts in 2549 days


#1 posted 12-21-2009 07:48 AM

I’ve seen where one would cut the tenon from end to stock. Placing a small shim into the kerf. When the tendon is driven into the mortise the shim spreads the tenon and tightens the joint. Doesn’t take much. Hope that is a good description. Here’s a different kind of tenon joit using 2 shims and a splayed mortise but it gives you the idea.
tenon

-- ~Just A Guy With A Hammer~

View Scott Bryan's profile

Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 3286 days


#2 posted 12-21-2009 01:29 PM

Partridge, one method of fixing loose tenons is to tighten them by gluing veneer or paper to them. For paper simply size brown grocery bag strip to fit the tenon and attach it to the loose tenon with yellow glue. This will increase the thickess of the tenon and tighten it to fit the mortise.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8901 posts in 3564 days


#3 posted 12-21-2009 04:22 PM

Hey Partridge, there are a few easy ways to fix this that will get you going in short order.

If the tenons are a little loose you will have to decide which level of fix is needed.

For wood glue, a tight fight is needed for proper adhesion.

If there is a slight gap, epoxy will act as a gap filler just fine. If the gap is a little bigger you can add wood dust to the epoxy to make a suitable gap filling glue. The dust can be collected from your sander dust collection bag.

If there is an even larger gap, then you may need to add material back onto the cheek. This can be accomplished by gluing wood back onto the cheeks of the tenon and then cutting them again.

Scott and JAGWAH’s suggestions are valid offerings.

My first choice if I am within the acceptable tolerances is the epoxy or epoxy with wood dust method. These provide the quickest fix for this situation.

Be sure to tape off the surrounding area to protect from squeeze out and a larger taped off area will protect from the stringy characteristics of handling epoxy.

I am a big believer in epoxy. This is also a very viable fix because with a small table, once it is all assembled it will be quite strong. Side tables do not suffer much stress on their joints over their lifetime.

Good Luck!

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View marcb's profile

marcb

768 posts in 3138 days


#4 posted 12-21-2009 07:38 PM

Do you have a hand plane?

Apply glue to the tenon, wrap a shaving around the tenon, then apply more glue to the outside of the shaving and install.

You probably want a dry run to figure out thickness and how man wraps. Worked like a charm on my stool

View marcb's profile

marcb

768 posts in 3138 days


#5 posted 12-21-2009 07:39 PM

Do you have a hand plane?

Apply glue to the tenon, wrap a shaving around the tenon, then apply more glue to the outside of the shaving and install.

You probably want a dry run to figure out thickness and how man wraps. Worked like a charm on my stool

View Partridge's profile

Partridge

296 posts in 3421 days


#6 posted 12-21-2009 10:59 PM

the gap is the thickness of 3 pieces of blue tape.

Thank you all for your in put.

-- I get out in the shop when I can

View Kent Shepherd's profile

Kent Shepherd

2718 posts in 2751 days


#7 posted 12-21-2009 11:15 PM

I have used business cards for shims for a lot of things, including tightening a tenon. Like Scott said, just glue it on as you glue the joint together.

Todd, I never used epoxy for gluing any joints before. I guess I had a bad taste from seeing “repair jobs” done by homeowners on their furniture and cabinet doors. All I’ve seen was very sloppy work and repairs that didn’t hold. Obviously there is validity to using it or you wouldn’t be doing it. I’ll have to check it out—-Thanks.

-- http://shepherdtoolandsupply.com/

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8901 posts in 3564 days


#8 posted 12-22-2009 06:20 AM

Kent, I would agree that the methods I described can be executed poorly and will look horrible. But I think that you, me, or Partridge have the skills and patience to execute the job expertly producing a different result.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8901 posts in 3564 days


#9 posted 12-22-2009 06:22 AM

Partridge – in my book that gap is within the range of epoxy and you could get away with or without dust on that one. Any bigger and I would say add the dust for sure.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View Mike_Henderson's profile

Mike_Henderson

18 posts in 2571 days


#10 posted 12-22-2009 07:31 AM

I always have veneer in the shop so I glue a piece of veneer to the tenon. But a couple of things to consider when you do that.

1. Align the grain of the veneer with the grain of the tenon.

2. Consider what the veneer will do to the position of your board being joined. For example, if the tenon board is supposed to be flush with the mortise board, you need to see which side of the tenon (for the veneer) maintains that position.

I’ve never been more than one piece of veneer too small but you could use two pieces if you’re really off.

Mike

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8901 posts in 3564 days


#11 posted 12-25-2009 12:55 AM

Here is a link to a video at FineWoodworking.com about a repair on Nakashima chair. The craftsman doing the repair specifically states he likes using epoxy because of it’s gap filling abilities.

http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/22001/nakashimas-leg

I am sure that you have already made your repair but it is good to note for future reference.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3042 days


#12 posted 12-25-2009 02:10 AM

All great fixes I think it makes a differance if it’s a through tenon or not.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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