LumberJocks

Skateboard Jig

  • Advertise with us

« back to Jigs & Fixtures forum

Forum topic by TheGeekPub posted 11-09-2015 05:52 PM 714 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View TheGeekPub's profile

TheGeekPub

13 posts in 402 days


11-09-2015 05:52 PM

Topic tags/keywords: jig resource trick question

Several years ago my son pestered me until I gave in (any Dad’s out there?). Together we made some old school skateboards (link to my article and video about said project). Short story: Basically a 3/4” section of scrap oak and some trucks from an old roller skate.

Well, now he is pestering me to make a real skateboard (and some for his buddies). He wants to make them from them completely from scratch. This includes plying the skateboard and putting it into a mold and pressure forming it.

OK. I think I have most of the process figured out, but I was hoping someone could help me with two things:

1) I am planning to re-saw the plies on the bandsaw. I don’t however have a drum sander to clean them up with like I see in all of the YouTube videos. Do you think it would be possible to plain them on the planer maybe using some melamine MDF and some spray adhesive?

2) Since my jig is going to be made from laminated MDF or pine it won’t be made from metal. This means I have to put something between the jig and the plies to apply heat to them. Has anyone ever done this before? What’s the best way to apply heat to the wood while its being held in the jig?

Thanks for all your ideas!

-- The Geek Pub, Mike Murray, http://www.thegeekpub.com/


9 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4218 posts in 1661 days


#1 posted 11-09-2015 06:26 PM

I’m not exactly clear on what you are trying to do… make a laminated board? If so, what do you need the heat for?

I’ve made several laminated sailboat tillers, which are laminated to get the alternating colors. The laminates are made about 1/4” so they can bend to the final shape. I have an aux. table (just a melamine board with cleats on each end to hold it in place) for my planer that lets me plane them to final thickness. Then a form is made out of some scrap wood to the shape of the tiller. The layers get glued and stacked on the form and clamped in position to cure (I use epoxy as it needs to be waterproof).

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View TheGeekPub's profile

TheGeekPub

13 posts in 402 days


#2 posted 11-09-2015 06:28 PM

If you look at a skateboard its just plywood. But it is formed to the shape of a skateboard. Do do this four or five plies are glued together and pressed in a heated forming mold to dry.

-- The Geek Pub, Mike Murray, http://www.thegeekpub.com/

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4218 posts in 1661 days


#3 posted 11-09-2015 06:36 PM

Still not seeing a need for a heated form… those tillers I made were 8-ply (4 each of contrasting color wood) and just clamped onto the form to cure. And they had some pretty substantial curves in them – much more than what a typical skateboard would have. What is the purpose of the heat?

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View TheGeekPub's profile

TheGeekPub

13 posts in 402 days


#4 posted 11-09-2015 06:38 PM

Well, that’s a good point. In all the pro videos on YouTube, they use a big metal heated form to clamp the board into. I honestly don’t know why it is heated.

-- The Geek Pub, Mike Murray, http://www.thegeekpub.com/

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 693 days


#5 posted 11-09-2015 07:21 PM

I think the pros use steam that’s where the heat comes in. Final thickness should be about 3/8.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View SuperCubber's profile

SuperCubber

868 posts in 1747 days


#6 posted 11-14-2015 08:39 PM

Mike, have you seen Bob’s video on it?

https://youtu.be/UW6-RQByjMs

He uses a vacuum bag and plys. Seems to work well without the use of heat.

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine

View pjones46's profile

pjones46

986 posts in 2105 days


#7 posted 11-15-2015 01:43 AM

I have made many for neighbor kids. I made a two piece wooden mold and use many large C-Camps to bring the two halves together as would a press on the layers. I have used 3 and 4 layers of 1/8” multi ply Baltic birch plywood or 2 layers of 1/4” multi ply Baltic birch plywood.

The mold shapes a slight curve along the length to the outer edges of the board and a slight curve toward the middle of the board from the long ends. The curve on the outside edges allows more control for turns while on the board and the crown to the center allows for weigh depression in a jump without bottoming out.

I use Tightbond 111 for glue and have no problems with delaminating during use. The thinner the board the better the spring on the board.

If inteested I will post a photo of my form.

There are many vids on the net of this process, do a google search.

-- Respectfully, Paul

View bbain32's profile

bbain32

21 posts in 637 days


#8 posted 11-21-2015 07:00 PM



Well, that s a good point. In all the pro videos on YouTube, they use a big metal heated form to clamp the board into. I honestly don t know why it is heated.

- TheGeekPub

The heat in the press may be used to cure the specific type of glue they are using. There is really no need to use a heated press for one-off construction of a board.

View Ger21's profile

Ger21

1047 posts in 2593 days


#9 posted 11-21-2015 07:14 PM

The only thing the heat will do is speed up the glue curing process. If you’re not in a hurry, you can do without the heat.

-- Gerry, http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/index.html http://www.jointcam.com

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com