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Scroll Saw Arm Link Slop

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Forum topic by Alan S posted 1677 days ago 776 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Alan S

172 posts in 1914 days


1677 days ago

I inherited a 20 year old Delta scroll saw from my late granddad and I have just started trying to use it. It is a parallel arm type saw. I was trying to cut some 1.5 – 2 inch pine with a #7 blade and I broke about three of them. I’m pretty sure that blade is too small for this wood, right?

Despite the wrong sized blade, this got me looking at the saw more closely and I noticed that if I lift up on the top arm where the blade is held (without a blade in place), it will move up slightly before engaging the bottom arm. Is that something I should try and fix? I opened up the link cover and it seems that one of the holes on the link bar that connects the two arms must be elongated to allow the arms to move slightly out of sync. Do I need to fix this before I can seriously use this saw? Thanks!!

Alan


5 replies so far

View RetiredCoastie's profile

RetiredCoastie

999 posts in 1780 days


#1 posted 1677 days ago

If you don’t get any responses, try looking here: http://www.owwm.com/ These folks deal specifically with old wood working machines.

-- www.thepatriotwoodworker.com Proud Supporter of Homes For Our Troops

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3647 posts in 2260 days


#2 posted 1677 days ago

When you install and tension a blade, is the slop still there?

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View Alan S's profile

Alan S

172 posts in 1914 days


#3 posted 1677 days ago

Nope. Once there’s tension on the blade, both arms seem secure.

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3647 posts in 2260 days


#4 posted 1676 days ago

If both arms are secure then I don’t think I would worry about it.

Typically, blades break when you either don’t have enough tension on the blade, or are putting too much sideways pressure on the blade. It is better to have too much tension on the blade than not enough. With tension applied, pluck the back of the blade like a guitar string … you should hear a high pitch ‘twang’.

Sideways pressure often results from trying to push the stock too hard into the blade. It is better to ease off on the pressure you exert and feed the stock into the teeth of the blade.

If I am cutting thick stock, I will also rub a little parafin on both sides of the blade to act as a lubricant.

Here’s a blog that is well worth checking out … http://scrollsawworkshop.blogspot.com/.

Good quality blades are also important … when I was using the name-brand blades from the big box I was breaking blades like crazy. I have switched to Flying Dutchman blades from http://www.mikesworkshop.com ... they cut better, last longer, and Mike provides first-rate service.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View RetiredCoastie's profile

RetiredCoastie

999 posts in 1780 days


#5 posted 1676 days ago

Dane! Thanks for the link, that’s a very nice site.

-- www.thepatriotwoodworker.com Proud Supporter of Homes For Our Troops

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