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Forum topic by MrAtlantis posted 11-07-2015 05:43 AM 1402 views 0 times favorited 46 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MrAtlantis

23 posts in 462 days


11-07-2015 05:43 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Preparing to install lighting and several outlets in my basement/shop.

What gauge wire is recommended?

I was thinking:

  • Lighting on a seperate 15a breaker, running 14-2. Should be adequate for, at most, 4 ballasts.
  • Table Saw and router on a 20a breaker, running 12-2.
  • 1 maybe 2 additional outlets on 20a breakers, running 12-2 also for vacuum, chargers, palm sander, etc.

Should I go 30a, and run 10-2 for the table saw? Or is this overkill?

I’ll check my equipment for ratings and such, but what’s typical?

Any guidance would be appreciated.

-- ||| Mr.Atlantis |||


46 replies so far

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oldnovice

5721 posts in 2827 days


#1 posted 11-07-2015 07:37 AM

15 amp circuit 14-2 is OK where I live now, but in my old basement shop I was forced to use conduit and GFCI outlets to comply with local codes.

You can find most of the general wiring codes for wire size and amperage on the Web, but there are also local codes, i.e. as I wrote above, that you may have to follow. You may want to follow these local codes in case something goes wrong and insurance gets involved or if you have the home inspected for a future sale. In California non compliance adds complexity for a property for sale.

If you ever plan to get a more than 2 HP or large dust collection system saw you may want to consider some 220 VAC wiring. It doesn’t need to be connected until you want to use it but getting all the wiring done at once is a great time saver.

That’s my two cents worth!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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Holbs

1369 posts in 1488 days


#2 posted 11-07-2015 10:36 AM

Add a 20amp 110v circuit in ceiling for a reel cord or something. You will be thankful later on

-- Yes, my profile picture is of a Carpenter Bee! The name is derived from the Ancient Greek "wood-cutter"

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TinWhiskers

179 posts in 411 days


#3 posted 11-07-2015 10:40 AM

Prices for LEDs have dropped a lot. Now is the time to convert. I converted to LED tubes 6 mo ago.

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Tennessee

2410 posts in 1974 days


#4 posted 11-07-2015 12:28 PM

Tin, I think I’ll look for LED’s when I finally run out of T-12 bulbs. I think I have a little over a case left.

Atlantis, 14-2 is fine for lighting. I ran 12-2 since I had plenty on the roll and didn’t have to buy a roll of 14-2.

12-2, 20 amp definitely for all your 120VAC tools and outlets. You may or may not have to use conduit. GFCI is also probably in the mix.
I just this year upgraded my incoming electric service and panels, and the inspector didn’t mention a thing about my non-conduit wiring in my shop, nor the crazy amount of tools I have plugged in at any particular time. Just looked at the breaker size in the new panels, wire size, and said all was well. Some of that was grandfathered, I am sure. Depends on where you live and who you think will see the work. Also always, always think in terms of reselling the house and what the inspector for the new owners would say, even if you have solid plans to die there. So stick to the code as much as possible even if there will be no inspection right now.

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

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joey502

487 posts in 977 days


#5 posted 11-07-2015 01:10 PM

My shop is wired to local codes, as of 2008 anyway. 60 amp sub panel in the garage, can not remember the wire size from the main to the sub. The lighting is 13 – 2 lamp linear fluorescent fixtures on a 15 amp circuit with 14/2. There are 6 – 20 amp circuits, all ran with 12/2, around the shop, all GFCI protected. I used the gray plastic conduit and metal boxes on the walls because my garage was insulated and covered in drywall.

My table saw is a 1.75 HP hybrid, it is on a single 20 amp circuit. No problems there. The start up draw on my saw is just under 13 amps.

If you have kids in the house I would suggest adding a way to shut the shops power down when you are not there. I installed a 60 amp general duty switch between the main panel and the sub panel 7’ from the floor. It can be locked out when I am not around.

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Holbs

1369 posts in 1488 days


#6 posted 11-07-2015 05:15 PM

you will have to research local codes about GFCI in your shop. In a garage setting, the first electrical plug in a specific circuit has to be GFCI and following plugs do not (was this local or national code? I forget). But you are in the basement so unsure what codes you have to follow.
Lighting: always safe to have 2 circuits for lighting incase one circuit cuts out while you are in the midst of a table saw cut. I have 3 zone lighting in my 2 car garage: 1 above the door (not used when door is up), other end of garage, and single light bulb hooked to my main house circuit.
For my code, I ran romex for everything in the ceiling and inside the walls, including 14/2 for lighting, 12/2 110v for machinery, 10/2 for 220v for machinery (10/2 might be overkill where 12/2 for 20amps would suffice, but I like to keep options open). By code, you can not put romex inside pipe (some kind of possible heat build up). Any wiring junction (if you go romex to that 3/8” metal flex with wiring inside) has to be done in a metal 4”x4” junction box.

-- Yes, my profile picture is of a Carpenter Bee! The name is derived from the Ancient Greek "wood-cutter"

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helluvawreck

23109 posts in 2326 days


#7 posted 11-07-2015 05:40 PM

Before you do anything you had better take a look at the fine print in your insurance policy. Insurance companies are beginning to take a dim view of do it yourself electricians.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

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DrTebi

248 posts in 2726 days


#8 posted 11-07-2015 06:21 PM


Prices for LEDs have dropped a lot. Now is the time to convert. I converted to LED tubes 6 mo ago.

- TinWhiskers

Me too. Installed 3 × 2 LED tube lights in my workshop. I used Home Depot or Lowes workshop lights, removed the ballast, and rewired for the LED Tubes. Philips LED Tubes are definitely my favorites, I tried some other ones before, they didn’t last long and the light was weaker and yellowish.

My workshop is the best lit room in the house!

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

5721 posts in 2827 days


#9 posted 11-07-2015 06:23 PM

+1Charles, insurance companies are getting very fussy so better be safe than sorry!

I would take the LED light suggestion from TinWhiskers too. I just replaced all my fluorescent and CFL lights in my garage. They are brighter, start immediately, do not hum, and will not draw any bugs as there in no UV content. See my review about the Feit lamps from Costco that I, and other LJs, installed.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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DrTebi

248 posts in 2726 days


#10 posted 11-07-2015 06:24 PM

I also recommend outlets in the ceiling. It’s very handy at times. I have my Air Filtration hanging from the ceiling and plugged in right there, too.

View crank49's profile

crank49

3980 posts in 2430 days


#11 posted 11-07-2015 08:41 PM

As said, 14-2 fine for lights.
12-2 good for most others.

Nothing about a 220/240 volt circuit requires a 30 amp circuit by default.
Wire size is determined by the load requirements; not voltage.

The circuit for the ceiling mounted reel is a good idea.

I would run 12-3 for the table saw in case I ever upgraded to a 240 volt saw.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

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WhyMe

608 posts in 1020 days


#12 posted 11-07-2015 11:24 PM

I would run 12-3 for the table saw in case I ever upgraded to a 240 volt saw.

- crank49

If you’re talking about NM-b (Romex), 12-3 isn’t needed for 240. There is no neutral for just 240V. XX-3 NM-b is 3 current carrying conductors plus a ground. XX-2 NM-b is 2 current carrying conductors plus a ground. If you’re talking about cordage then the ground is counted in the numbering.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17654 posts in 3135 days


#13 posted 11-09-2015 06:40 AM

Should I go 30a, and run 10-2 for the table saw? Or is this overkill?

#10 certainly will not hurt anything. You never know when you might want to go larger for TS, dust collection and compressors. Depending on the length of run, #10 will have lower voltage drop. Last small shop I wired before I retired, I ran #10 for his TS outlet circuit even though it wasn’t required. The code is just a minimum, not a maximum ;-)

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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Knothead62

2581 posts in 2420 days


#14 posted 11-09-2015 03:57 PM

14-2 is OK for lighting but why buy two different wire sizes? I would recommend going with 12-2 for all wiring for 120V. As mentioned, check local codes to make sure you are covered to sell the home or if something goes wrong.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

812 posts in 681 days


#15 posted 11-10-2015 03:28 PM

I agree with Crank, run 12/3 20A and you can set it up at the outlet for 110V, then easily switch to 220V later,

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