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Question About Finishing Reclaimed Wood

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Forum topic by wmgworks posted 11-06-2015 09:02 PM 492 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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wmgworks

193 posts in 446 days


11-06-2015 09:02 PM

I have some reclaimed wood that has that distressed look I’d like to maintain. It’s got red paint on it, and I want ot keep it looking a little rough. But the problem is, if someone grabbed it they may get a splinter. So how do I “desplinter” it enough to keep it safe, but not have to sand all the rusticness away?

-- Butchering wood since 2015


6 replies so far

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HokieKen

1738 posts in 599 days


#1 posted 11-06-2015 09:32 PM

Best suggestion I have is localized sanding. Just go over the wood with your hand to identify the areas where splintering is an issue and sand lightly so as not to remove the patina of the wood. How bad is the splintering? It sounds like the wood may be dry. You might try giving it a few good coats of BLO or Tung oil to “moisturize” it without altering the color (much, hopefully). Then lightly sand the problem areas. Then another coat or 2 of oil should bring it back to a fairly uniform patina. I’d keep oiling as long as it keeps soaking it up. When you have to wipe excess oil off after 12 hours or so, you’ve got enough in there. The oiling suggestion assumes your red paint doesn’t seal the wood enough to keep it from absorbing the oil. Some pics of the wood and info on the type of wood may help illicit some more specific suggestions.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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wmgworks

193 posts in 446 days


#2 posted 11-06-2015 09:38 PM

Thanks for the advice. How high of a grit do you think I should go up to just to get rid of the splinters. The faces of the boards are fine. It;s the edges that have the issues

-- Butchering wood since 2015

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Gixxerjoe04

835 posts in 1037 days


#3 posted 11-06-2015 10:46 PM

On some reclaimed stuff I’ve done, if it’s grey and I plan on putting finish on it, I usually sand the grey away. Whenever I’ve finished the grey weathered wood then it’s usually too dark for my liking plus the real weathered stuff is pretty rough. I usually use 120 then 220. You could always start with 220 and see how it works and if it doesn’t then go to 120. Of course it will take the grey away but if the wood has saw marks, it won’t take those away.

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wmgworks

193 posts in 446 days


#4 posted 11-06-2015 10:53 PM

What if you want to leave the existing paint but just remove splinters? 80 grit?

-- Butchering wood since 2015

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Gixxerjoe04

835 posts in 1037 days


#5 posted 11-06-2015 11:01 PM

That would def take the paint off I’d say, how rough is it? Got any pics. I’d probably just try 220 and see what happens, can always try a lower grit but if you start out too low, could mess up you whole plan.

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wmgworks

193 posts in 446 days


#6 posted 11-06-2015 11:05 PM

Duh (me). What you said the first time totally makes sense now. I see what you were saying. You can always take more off but never put more back :D

-- Butchering wood since 2015

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