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MiniMax SC4 Elite or Hammer?

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Forum topic by MathieuTN posted 11-05-2015 10:00 PM 686 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MathieuTN

9 posts in 427 days


11-05-2015 10:00 PM

Well after my scare with my table saw the other night I have decided to sell it and buy a European slider. I am putting my General on craiglist. I bought it brand new and have used it for about a full 60 seconds of cutting time. I work with my hands in the babnking business, and cannot take a chance of losing a digit or two.

Can you please enlighten me or provide me your thoughts on the two sliders? I am buying new.


7 replies so far

View socrbent's profile

socrbent

417 posts in 1729 days


#1 posted 11-05-2015 11:44 PM

Sounds like you may be a good candidate for a SawStop with slider attachment – http://www.sawstop.com/crosscut. I love my Sawstop, but don’t have the slider attachment which has been introduced since I bought my saw. The saw has protected me when I made a mistake. It fired and left me with a small surface nick and no blood spilled.

-- socrbent Ohio

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

693 posts in 684 days


#2 posted 11-06-2015 03:18 AM

Get the one that fits your budget best, but also the one that will handle the size of projects you’re interested in building.
I read in a previous post that you’re just getting started and if you can get something you can grow into, I think it’s better than getting something small, then having to upgrade a few times as you increase in skill and interest.

I looked into either a sawstop and a format table saw and after weighing the 2 options, I went with the euro style.
I purchased a Grizzly though as the mini max, or felder just didn’t fit my budget.
The sawstop does have a sliding table, but it’s not the same as a true format saw and after reading some reviews, I saw there were some issues with the sliding table attachment.

Best of luck in your woodworking and you’re starting with the right concerns. Safety is often overlooked.

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gmc

33 posts in 1616 days


#3 posted 11-06-2015 04:01 PM

I might be wrong but it sounds like your top concern is safety. Saw Stop would be the only saw to answer any concern with losing a finger at this time. Bosh has a contractor saw available soon but doesn’t compare to saw stop’s available saws. I struggled with the same decision for two years and finally bought the Saw Stop. It is the best saw I have ever used, we’ll worth the piece of mind and cost. Extremely well made and easy to assemble and use. JMTC

-- Gary, Central Illinois

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gmc

33 posts in 1616 days


#4 posted 11-06-2015 04:02 PM

I might be wrong but it sounds like your top concern is safety. Saw Stop would be the only saw to answer any concern with losing a finger at this time. Bosh has a contractor saw available soon but doesn’t compare to saw stop’s available saws. I struggled with the same decision for two years and finally bought the Saw Stop. It is the best saw I have ever used, we’ll worth the piece of mind and cost. Extremely well made and easy to assemble and use. JMTC

-- Gary, Central Illinois

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

693 posts in 684 days


#5 posted 11-06-2015 04:14 PM



I might be wrong but it sounds like your top concern is safety. Saw Stop would be the only saw to answer any concern with losing a finger at this time. Bosh has a contractor saw available soon but doesn t compare to saw stop s available saws. I struggled with the same decision for two years and finally bought the Saw Stop. It is the best saw I have ever used, we ll worth the piece of mind and cost. Extremely well made and easy to assemble and use. JMTC

- gmc

It really isn’t the only saw for safety.

Euro slider saws, like he is looking at can actually be considered safer than a Sawstop. A sawstop only protects against a finger contacting the blade. It doesn’t protect against kickback or other flying objects.
A slider, places the operator to the side of the blade, not directly behind it and the hand pushes a carriage, not the wood so it’s kept away from the blade.

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

805 posts in 2221 days


#6 posted 11-06-2015 04:30 PM

I have a Hammer K3 winner 48” x 48” sliding table saw and love it. The sliding table has T-slots and this allows you to attach hold-downs and any jig you can dream up. By clamping the work to the sliding table your fingers don’t need to get anywhere near the saw blade. You can still do ripping in the standard manner. I use a home made fancy “pusher” to do this and keep my fingers away from the blade. I find the saw EXTREMELY accurate! Every setting is exactly out of the box. I suggest calling Hammer USA and asking for a demo by an owner near you. I do this for Hammer occasionally in the Atlanta, GA area when asked.

Of course, you can do a lot of this with your present saw by making a “sled” that acts as a sliding table. These use the miter gauge slot in the table as a guide and you can clamp work to these if you choose. Not quite as versatile as a true sliding table but close.

Planeman

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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MathieuTN

9 posts in 427 days


#7 posted 11-06-2015 11:43 PM

I am going with the SC4 by Mini Max. Thanks for the comments everyone.

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