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Should I go with 8/4 or 10/4

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Forum topic by Eric_S posted 12-18-2009 04:48 PM 1183 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Eric_S

1551 posts in 2655 days


12-18-2009 04:48 PM

Forgive me if this sounds stupid. I’m purchasing hard maple this weekend for legs of my nightstands I’m slowly working on (damn holidays holding me back). The legs are going to have final measurements 2×2x24. Is getting 8/4 unplaned going to be a bad idea? Would you recommend going with 10/4 for 2” legs? I’m flattening boards with a hand plane before using my Rigid Planer to thickness them, and I’ve only ever boughten 4/4 boards and planed down to 3/4. So I was wondering how much extra thickness will be in 8/4? Just 1/16?

-- - Eric Noblesville, IN


12 replies so far

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woodbutcher

592 posts in 3626 days


#1 posted 12-18-2009 05:20 PM

Eric-S,
You will need to start with 10/4 if you need a finished size of 2×2x24. In rough lumber each 1/4 signifies one quarter of an inch of thickness. So 10/4 is actually 2 and 1/2 inches thick which should clean up to the 2” x 2” size you need. The 8/4 lumber would leave no room to dress the rough lumber.
Just remember, try and remove equal amounts of wood from both sides of the rough lumber until you achieve the final dimension. Naturally with wood being wood there can be exceptions, such as badly bowed or cupped rough stock to begin with. Try and pick as flat and straight lumber as you can to start. Let it acclimate to your shop conditions before you start milling! Have fun.

Sincerely,
Ken McGinnis

-- woodbutcher north carolina

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JAGWAH

929 posts in 2544 days


#2 posted 12-18-2009 05:40 PM

Consider this in future, (lock-mitre legs) it’s a safe/great pdf file

http://www.stuswoodworks.com/gusguild/2009/03/gratuitous-plug/?aid=882&pid=481&sa=1

I’ve used this method many times to reduce cost using some expensive woods and for column construction for greater strength.

-- ~Just A Guy With A Hammer~

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Eric_S

1551 posts in 2655 days


#3 posted 12-18-2009 07:38 PM

Woodbutcher thank you for the advice. I am familliar with planing and letting wood acclimate though, I’m just not used to buying wood and knowing how much extra remains..

Jagwah, THANK YOU! I saw a video at FW a while back but I couldn’t find it again. This is exactly what I wanted to do, so thank you :) However, will this method still work if I’m going to have a curve in the side? So after gluing all four sides up, the outer sides of each leg will arc inwords similar to this view of the front two table legs )| |(

-- - Eric Noblesville, IN

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JAGWAH

929 posts in 2544 days


#4 posted 12-18-2009 07:45 PM

Sure, to a degree. If you maintain the outer corner you could have a nice arc. I would draw to scale the width and thickness of your legs side. Draw in the profile of the lock-mitre the determine the amount of arc you can get while leaving good purchase in the joint. Certainly worth trying on say pine/scrap stock first to see how it works.

I can’t begin to tell you about all the ideas I’ve had that have been great learning failures that have made my work so much better. Hopefully for you this should work.

-- ~Just A Guy With A Hammer~

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Eric_S

1551 posts in 2655 days


#5 posted 12-18-2009 08:00 PM

Thanks again jagwah. As much as I would like to try this, I’m so antsy to get these legs finished so I can work on the mortise and tenons already. So I may this time just go with 10/4 to speed up what sounds like a very time consuming process. I hope to post pics in the next few weeks of the progress I’ve made, but for now its just wood shavings piling up on the floor from all the hand planing (not too exciting) since I dont have jointer.

-- - Eric Noblesville, IN

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Moron

5032 posts in 3354 days


#6 posted 12-18-2009 08:06 PM

why not reduce the leg thickness to 1 7/8” and increase the length of other parts.

As the thickness of wood rises, so does the price per board foot

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View jlsmith5963's profile

jlsmith5963

297 posts in 2808 days


#7 posted 12-18-2009 08:50 PM

Eric perhaps this will help…

Hardwood sizing:
Hardwood sizing can be a bit more confusing, because it often depends on whether the stock is surfaced on one side (S1S) or on two sides (S2S). A one-inch piece of stock will typically measure 7/8” if it is surfaced on one side, but 13/16” if surfaced on two (opposite) sides.
Hardwoods rarely come in standard dimensions like softwoods. Instead of finding a 2×6 in hardwood vareties, you’ll find that suppliers sell hardwoods in random varieties measured by the board-foot.

Additionally, hardwood may be sold in quarters. Each quarter refers to a 1/4-inch in thickness, meaning, a 5/4 board is roughly 1-1/4”. If your project calls for a piece that is exactly one-inch thick, you’ll want to purchase a 5/4 board and mill it down to the proper size using a surface planer.

-- criticism: the art of analyzing and evaluating the quality of an artistic work...

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Eric_S

1551 posts in 2655 days


#8 posted 12-18-2009 09:24 PM

Roman, its actually another possilbility that I have been thinking of and strongly considering.

Thanks jlsmtih for the info.

-- - Eric Noblesville, IN

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 3448 days


#9 posted 12-18-2009 10:32 PM

I don’t know the final shape of you legs, but sometimes you can get by with a glue-up at the part near the table top if it won’t show.

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

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Eric_S

1551 posts in 2655 days


#10 posted 12-18-2009 10:42 PM

Gary, If your interested, the sketchup of it is in my blog here: http://lumberjocks.com/Eric_S/blog/11826
The legs have been thinned a little, I think those in the pics measure 3×2, and now they are 2×2 and maybe even 2×1 7/8

What do yo mean by doing the glue-up at the part?

-- - Eric Noblesville, IN

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Ger21

1047 posts in 2591 days


#11 posted 12-19-2009 03:40 PM

Be aware that you might not be able to get 1-7/8 out of 8/4, if there’s any cup or bow in the stock.

-- Gerry, http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/index.html http://www.jointcam.com

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Eric_S

1551 posts in 2655 days


#12 posted 12-22-2009 06:03 PM

Well, after calling a bunch of places locally and afar and looking online, no one seems to have 10/4 hard maple or won’t at least for a few months. So the friendly lady at West Penn Hardwood (decided to order from them online because price was reasonable and they had 10/4 listed) assured me that the 8/4 they had was very straight. So 8/4 it is. Looks like I’ll have to adjust the side lengths and possibly tenon depths now.

I really hope they turn out well. I’ll just have to be extra careful at taking fine passes with my planer and hand planes.

-- - Eric Noblesville, IN

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