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(Question) Hard Maple Woodworking bench top

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Forum topic by TomHoffman posted 11-04-2015 08:03 PM 1037 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TomHoffman

14 posts in 1991 days


11-04-2015 08:03 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I acquired a 3” thick X 8’ long X 32” wide commercial kitchen prep table top. It is solid hard maple laid face to face on their edges with solid 3/4 dowels through them every foot along the edge.

Because it was used, it did have use wear and it was cupped out where cans were run over the top by the permanently mounted can openers on either end.

I got it off the rusted rotted legs and got all the hardware off it and took it in to a Commercial WW shop in town and between 4 men we ran it through their big commercial sander till the top was true and flat.

I had stored it for 4 years till just this past week to finally get on it for a project.

It was stored on edge and over several years, the edges and ends picked up some black mold spotting I would like to get off. I tried sanding and it is too deep. I tried bleach, no luck.

I would appreciate any help in getting the mold gone. The top has no mold as we sanded it down 1/4” so now it is 2 3/4” thick.

Ideas???

-- "Lord, keep your arm around my shoulders and your hand firmly over my mouth!!"


18 replies so far

View Richard H's profile

Richard H

489 posts in 1146 days


#1 posted 11-04-2015 08:29 PM

I would probably just rip off 1/4” to 1/2” off each edge to get to clean wood unless you really want those dimensions for something.

A track saw or circular saw with guide would be the best way in my shop. I don’t have the room, muscle or big machines needed to move a heavy slab like that to my machines. You can get both sides as close as possible than clean them up with a plane or a router with a long pattern bit.

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SASmith

1850 posts in 2453 days


#2 posted 11-04-2015 08:39 PM

Maybe wood bleach will remove it. aka Oxalic Acid

-- Scott Smith, Southern Illinois

View TomHoffman's profile

TomHoffman

14 posts in 1991 days


#3 posted 11-04-2015 08:46 PM

Ripping off the edge would be a good idea, except I don’t have a circular saw with a blade that will do 2 3/4” It is two heavy to put over my 10” TS and my radial arm ripping table is only 12” wide. I may just take a hand power plane to it.

Where can I get Wood Bleach? I will have to check on Amazon…

-- "Lord, keep your arm around my shoulders and your hand firmly over my mouth!!"

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BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1835 days


#4 posted 11-04-2015 09:02 PM

If you have a router, you could do it in a multi-step approach. Put a rabbetting bit on, and set the cutter depth to half the depth of the top, and run a groove down the side (may need to adjust the bit height and make a second pass to widen the groove). Put a flush-trim bit on, line the bearing up with the groove, and trim it flush. The only downside is you’ll have to flip the top over and run the flush trim bit again, but if you have an extra set of hands it should be do-able.

It’ll take a bit more time (make light passes), but it will work.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3945 posts in 1959 days


#5 posted 11-04-2015 09:03 PM

What about using a router? Make it in a few passes, each one a little deeper, then flip it over and finish the edge with a flush trim bit. I do have to admit,if you have a hand power planer that would be a good way.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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TomHoffman

14 posts in 1991 days


#6 posted 11-04-2015 09:22 PM

Flipping over is a great idea problem is it weighs over 300 lbs and I am by myself.

-- "Lord, keep your arm around my shoulders and your hand firmly over my mouth!!"

View ElChe's profile

ElChe

630 posts in 802 days


#7 posted 11-04-2015 09:29 PM

I buy oxalic acid (wood bleach) in powder/crystal form at my local paint store. Or a decking supply place may have it as it is diluted and used to clean decks. I wouldn’t rip it unless absolutely necessary. Mix the oxalic acid with water and then spray it on the mold and see if it works. I’ve cleaned some pretty grimy decks with it. It might bleach the maple a bit but I think there is a good chance it will get rid of the mold.

-- Tom - Measure twice cut once. Then measure again. Curse. Fudge.

View HokieKen's profile (online now)

HokieKen

1786 posts in 604 days


#8 posted 11-04-2015 09:48 PM

Is the mold in the end grain or are the ends breadboarded? If there’s breadboards and the mold is in face grain all the way around, I’d go at it with a handplane. Endgrain makes that a less likely possibility. Especially if it’s changing direction.

Otherwise, I’d combine Richard and BinghamtonEd’s suggestions. I’d use the circular saw to cut a groove in the top side as deep as the blade allows about 1/4” in from the edge. Then take a chisel and knock off the excess so you basically have a 1/4” notch out. Then you can take the router with a flush trim bit and use it from the bottom of the table with the bearing riding on the surface left by the circ. saw. Not much fun running a router upside down, but still doable. Or, if you have,or can get, a pattern bit (bottom bearing) that’s long enough, you can do the same thing but run the router from the top of the table.

Or, you could just borrow TomWhisker's circular saw.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4035 posts in 1817 days


#9 posted 11-04-2015 09:52 PM

Just hand plane the edges and trim the ends.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4456 posts in 3426 days


#10 posted 11-04-2015 09:55 PM

Just use it. The mold is a minor issue unless you’re gonna be lickin’ on the bench top.
My bench is from a bowling alley lane. No tellin’ how much crap was on it, but with 15+ years of careful loving use, it is just as good as new.
Don’t over think the project. You’ll have many more issues about which to worry. Sharp planes, chisels, bench dog holes, hold fasts, and more.
Oil the crap (no pun) out of it. Put the top to work. You’re one lucky feller to have it. :)
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View TomHoffman's profile

TomHoffman

14 posts in 1991 days


#11 posted 11-04-2015 10:04 PM

Thanks Bill,

I was just on the phone with an RC Sailboat friend and he asked me the big question, can I use my Zyliss vices on it?

I can’t as the top is too thick, so I am going to edge it with 1 1/2 X 1 1/2” Maple and that will cover the top 1 1/2” of the side and then I won’t able to see the lower part any more anyway.

We both build wood RC Sailboats for kicks.

Regards…

-- "Lord, keep your arm around my shoulders and your hand firmly over my mouth!!"

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rustfever

716 posts in 2776 days


#12 posted 11-04-2015 11:31 PM

You state the piece has dowels @ 12” OC. Are those dowels or steel rods with dowel plugs? I believe some cutting table tops are held together with steel rods/bolts. Before I would try to cut, I would check for [ss?] bolts.

-- Rustfever, Central California

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TomHoffman

14 posts in 1991 days


#13 posted 11-05-2015 12:01 AM

That’s a good idea, I hadn’t thought about that at all. I am leaning toward just adding a ledge strip 1.5”X1.5” on the edge all the way around so my Zyliss Vice clamps have something to clamp on to, that way I won’t have to drill holes for dogs or mount side and end vises.

Tom…

-- "Lord, keep your arm around my shoulders and your hand firmly over my mouth!!"

View ThomasChippendale's profile

ThomasChippendale

244 posts in 398 days


#14 posted 11-08-2015 03:26 AM

Like my workbench, built in 1984:

The strip is 2 X 4 maple and the top made of 2, 4 X 12 maple beams bolted together.

-- PJ

View ThomasChippendale's profile

ThomasChippendale

244 posts in 398 days


#15 posted 11-08-2015 03:34 AM

-- PJ

showing 1 through 15 of 18 replies

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