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Sears & Roebuck 3064748 Antique Planer and Delco YA 5280 Motor

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Forum topic by Wannabe WoodWorkers posted 11-04-2015 03:48 AM 1161 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Wannabe WoodWorkers

18 posts in 444 days


11-04-2015 03:48 AM

Got a pretty good deal on this guy but am having a hard time finding out any information about it. We already had to leave the original stand for it behind due to size/weight and I’ve just purchased a 2HP motor to replace the original dinosaur of a 3HP motor (for the cost of wiring up 220v for the original motor I was already halfway to the price of a brand new 2HP 110v replacement that weighs at least less than half as much). Figured I better find out if this thing has any historical value before selling the motor too. We’re moving in less than a year and I never want to have to pick that thing up again :P

TYFYH, looking for any input on sources of info and/or value for the old 220v motor.

-- A Wannabe WoodWorker from https://www.facebook.com/wannabewoodworkers/


12 replies so far

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7935 posts in 1848 days


#1 posted 11-04-2015 05:21 AM

When I google searched your subject line, this was in the first search result.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Wannabe WoodWorkers

18 posts in 444 days


#2 posted 11-04-2015 08:11 AM

I was actually looking for info on the tool and motor I own but thanks anyways.

-- A Wannabe WoodWorker from https://www.facebook.com/wannabewoodworkers/

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 698 days


#3 posted 11-04-2015 11:22 AM

Vintage Machinery and OWWM. That will get you where you need to go.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

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Rick M

7935 posts in 1848 days


#4 posted 11-04-2015 06:39 PM


I was actually looking for info on the tool and motor I own but thanks anyways.

- Wannabe WoodWorkers

Sears didn’t manufacture machines, they bought them from other companies like Belsaw, King Seeley, Atlas, etc. Sometimes it’s easier to find information about a machine by looking for the actual manufacturer which in your case is Belsaw. If yours isn’t a 910, it’s probably a 905. You might also find some info here. As for value, I can’t help. Values tend to vary by region and the less common something is, the harder it is to price.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Planeman40

805 posts in 2229 days


#5 posted 11-04-2015 10:49 PM

Yes, its a Belsaw planer/molder. It appears to be an early one, probably from the 1940s or early 1950s. I have a Belsaw I bought in the early 1970s and its still running smoothly and strongly. Excellent machine! Looks a little rough and ungainly compared to today’s planers, however its a workhorse and, if in good shape, will do an excellent planing job. Clean that sucker up and oil it good and you’ll have an excellent planer. Belsaw is still in business and can supply some parts. The sprockets, pulleys, chains and bearings are “off the shelf” items that can be bought at most bearing and drive suppliers.

1

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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Wannabe WoodWorkers

18 posts in 444 days


#6 posted 11-04-2015 10:57 PM

@Rick It’s definitely not a 910. Looks like a 905, that manual you linked is most helpful, thank you. Mine didn’t come with the jointer table shown, assuming that’s an accessory upgrade or something long lost to the ages. The Craftsman page on Vintage Machinery doesn’t have anything close to my model number, I’d already checked before posting.

-- A Wannabe WoodWorker from https://www.facebook.com/wannabewoodworkers/

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Wannabe WoodWorkers

18 posts in 444 days


#7 posted 11-04-2015 11:05 PM

Thanks Planeman40. It was in use by the previous woodworker that I bought it from, he took good care of it. Apparently a lot of guys use those job-site planers but the only one I ever used was downright pathetic, couldn’t plane 1×4 walnut without throwing a shoulder into it and that was on a shallow cut. So I was pretty excited to find this thing. Not a plastic part in site. I did read somewhere before purchasing that replacement parts for old Craftsman stuff was still available so I’ll probably get one of everything to have on hand down the road. Love love love off the shelf parts too.

Any advice on restoration? Was just thinking about making the thing shine but not sure how to keep it that way. Obviously could paint it but I’d prefer not to. (Edit: just found the thread on 9121 restoration)

-- A Wannabe WoodWorker from https://www.facebook.com/wannabewoodworkers/

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Planeman40

805 posts in 2229 days


#8 posted 11-05-2015 01:03 AM

Just clean it up good and be sure to put a lightweight oil in the little dimples on the Oilite bearings that hold the board feed rollers (I have these on my machine, yours may be a little different). The proper color of my 1970s vintage Belsaw is a medium gray “hammertone” paint. I have seen these in spray cans. Yours is an earlier vintage I believe so there may be a difference in color, probably no hammertone, just a straight medium gray. I see you have the table infeed and outfeed bolt-on extensions which is good. Just put a straightedge across the joint between these and the cast iron table to make sure they are level and the upper surface is even with the top of the cast iron table. The feed rollers are rubber and these may need to be replaced. If so, contact Belsaw (http://www.belsaw.com/). I believe they still offer replacements. If not, search through McMaster Carr (http://www.mcmaster.com/#general-purpose-hose/=zo4tis) for a suitable hose to use.

Good luck and have fun!

Planeman

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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Wannabe WoodWorkers

18 posts in 444 days


#9 posted 11-05-2015 06:48 AM

Good call on the in/out feed tables. I’d removed them to lighten the load when moving it and didn’t check to make sure they were perfectly in line but I’ll do that once the blades get back from the sharpener. I’d toyed with the idea of just building it into my assembly table but realized that I would lose storage space which is already at a premium in the shop. The frame it was on when I purchased it was an angle iron monstrosity, would barely have fit in the truck even if it hadn’t already been loaded up with that sweet sweet Wisconsin hard wood :)

If I have it painted I probably wouldn’t go original color. I’m thinking more along the line of flames or something :D

So other than it being a well-built tool that will last forever do you know if there is any historical/antique value to these?

-- A Wannabe WoodWorker from https://www.facebook.com/wannabewoodworkers/

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Planeman40

805 posts in 2229 days


#10 posted 11-05-2015 03:36 PM

Suggestion: Put casters on all of your floor mounted tools. I have done that and I really helps deal with a small space. I have plenty of room but too many machines. The ones that are rarely used are rolled into what I call a “parking lot”area in one area of the shop. I can easily roll one out and plug it in when needed. And don’t worry about locking casters. I have found none of my machines need locking type casters. Their weight keeps them from moving.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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Wannabe WoodWorkers

18 posts in 444 days


#11 posted 11-05-2015 09:18 PM

Yeah actually we were working on that last night. I had a set of heavy duty steel casters for my workbench project but the planer table is much more in demand at the moment so we’ll stick them on there. We were just talking about locking ones too. I have one of the heavy duty Ridgid tablesaws on casters and it’s definitely not heavy enough to keep it from rolling around when they’re down. I thought the thing was a heavy beast until I got into hand planing and found myself adding rocks to help hold it down.

I read a FWW article where they just used a floor jack to set the workbench on some blocks for stability then just jack it up and remove the blocks when they want to move it. I think the solution we settled on was just some chock blocks, certainly have enough scrap wood for that :D

What kind of casters do you use?

-- A Wannabe WoodWorker from https://www.facebook.com/wannabewoodworkers/

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Planeman40

805 posts in 2229 days


#12 posted 11-06-2015 12:20 AM

What kind of casters do you use?

Harbor Freight casters.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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