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greenwood stool legs + dryer seat?

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Forum topic by treesner posted 11-03-2015 08:56 PM 490 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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treesner

166 posts in 425 days


11-03-2015 08:56 PM

Topic tags/keywords: greenwoodworking stool joint

Hey guy’s i’ve been working on a stool of greenwood.

I carved out the seat and some legs but decided the legs were to short so I ended up getting a fresh log (same wood) for some new legs. However these new legs are much more green than the seat now. From what i understand this is the opposite of what one would want as the green legs would shrink and fall out opposed to if the seat was more green it would shrink and tighten on the legs.

I’m new to this green woodworking stuff so trying to figure it out.. should i let the legs dry out further, and is it normal to attach seat and legs when they’re both green or do people just carve green and assemble dry?

Final note, i’m using a tapered tenon (probably with a wedge) so perhaps the falling out problem isn’t so bad but curious to learn about this process more.

thanks
–chris


6 replies so far

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treesner

166 posts in 425 days


#1 posted 11-03-2015 10:21 PM

Was reading a windsor chair interview and sounds like they do dry on dry for legs to seat.

but one comment said drying the tenon and keeping the leg wet


-GB, I turn my legs green then wrap the middle portion in tin foil so the tapered tenon will dry. I’ve even put them in the oven at about 175 degrees to dry the taper. When you pull the foil off after it comes out of the oven, the middle is still wet. Thanks for your input BG2 1/16/03

-I’ve heard of another method used to attempt to achieve what you are describing with tinfoil. A coffee can of sand on the woodstove with the tapered ends of the legs stuck into it. I’m not sure about the success or failure of this method, any one out there tried this? GB 1/16/03

http://www.windsorchairresources.com/tips/tenons.html

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Ocelot

1470 posts in 2098 days


#2 posted 11-03-2015 10:36 PM

If you use a conical reamer and make the leg ends conical, it won’t matter. As it shrinks, each leg will just seat deeper in the hole. If they are through holes, you may have to trim again as more will protrude through the top side.

Note : I’ve never done this but just today read about it.

Here’s how to make your own reamer.

http://www.greenwoodworking.com/SawSteelTaperedReamerPlans

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treesner

166 posts in 425 days


#3 posted 11-03-2015 10:58 PM

The legs go through the seat all the way and was planning to shim

I think to do a conical joint i’d need to cut my reamer down or get a larger one, the end, smallest part is 5/8

i’m using this reamer http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?cat=1,180,42240,53317&p=54865
with this tenon cutter http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/page.aspx?p=54835&cat=1,180,42288&ap=1

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jdh122

879 posts in 2278 days


#4 posted 11-03-2015 11:48 PM

I’d suggest you let the legs dry until they’re at least as dry as the seat. It’s true that the tapered hole helps, but if the leg has to move to set deeper in the seat I’d be afraid it would break the glue joint. It seems like most Windsor chair makers do either dry-on-dry for that joint or kiln-dried tenons into air-dried mortises. I don’t think anyone assembles any type of chair while all of the wood is still green.
I should add that while I’ve made several post-and-rung greenwood chairs (where the wood shrinkage is an integral part of construction) I’m currently working on my first Windsor-style chair.
On the plus side it won’t take that long for the leg pieces to dry, especially inside your house in winter, nothing close to a year an inch, probably more like a month or two (at least in my experience).

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

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treesner

166 posts in 425 days


#5 posted 11-04-2015 12:06 AM



I d suggest you let the legs dry until they re at least as dry as the seat. It s true that the tapered hole helps, but if the leg has to move to set deeper in the seat I d be afraid it would break the glue joint. It seems like most Windsor chair makers do either dry-on-dry for that joint or kiln-dried tenons into air-dried mortises. I don t think anyone assembles any type of chair while all of the wood is still green.
I should add that while I ve made several post-and-rung greenwood chairs (where the wood shrinkage is an integral part of construction) I m currently working on my first Windsor-style chair.
On the plus side it won t take that long for the leg pieces to dry, especially inside your house in winter, nothing close to a year an inch, probably more like a month or two (at least in my experience).

- jdh122

thanks for the opinion that’s probably what i ought to do. currently i have the ends sealed and in bags, is this the right way to do it let them dry out, i don’t want them to crack.

when letting legs dry do i need to rope them down at all. i’m not sure if they will end up warping

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jdh122

879 posts in 2278 days


#6 posted 11-04-2015 12:10 AM

As long as you’ve split the legs out of a log so that you don’t have the pith there’s no need to dry them in bags like people do with greenwood bowls. I’ve never had a post or rung split and I’ve never even sealed the ends, generally I just leave them sit. I’ve had a few warp a little bit, although since they’re shaped with a drawknife to follow the grain of the wood they’re not really perfectly straight to start with anyway, so minor warping is not all that significant a consideration. You probably could rope them down if you’re really concerned about it.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

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