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Craftsman 840 Sideboard Plans (From 1910 Stickley Catalog)

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Forum topic by jpsexton posted 11-03-2015 01:28 PM 863 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jpsexton

25 posts in 696 days


11-03-2015 01:28 PM

Topic tags/keywords: plans craftsman stickley sideboard white oak question oak arts and crafts greene and greene

I found a PDF copy of the July 1910 Craftsman Furniture Catalog by Gustav Stickley and in it there is a plan for a sideboard, a huge mass of a sideboard. The No. 840 Sideboard to be exact, and I want to build it. I’ve made a couple of smaller pieces so this will be a challenge to both my growing skills and my patience. Here is a picture with the only dimensions provided:

Obviously the rough dimensions will help with most of the rest, but looking at similar builds I’m struggling with a few things and would really appreciate any input.

1) Drawer height: assuming (and yes I know the rule about assuming) a height of 29” to match the height of the cupboard and 3/4 between each drawer and 1/16” for spacing around each side of the drawer, so again I’m guessing because the picture is a bit distorted, the bottom two drawers are 6” the next two are 5” and the top is 3” but that leaves me a bit short at 28 5/8”

2) top thickness, just a guess at 5/4 based on other plans I’ve seen

3) Height of skirt around bottom and rest of case. Case appears to be 1” and I’m guessing 7” for the skirt combined with the top to give a total of 40”.

If anyone has any leads to more details and cares to share them I’d greatly appreciate it. I’ve got the PDF of the catalog and if anyone is interested in a copy of it please PM me and I’ll send it along.

Thanks much

Jason

-- There is an easy way and a hard way and I always seem choose the hard way. Figure it's the best way to learn.


8 replies so far

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AandCstyle

2561 posts in 1717 days


#1 posted 11-03-2015 11:40 PM

Jason, I have never seen this piece before, but I have a couple suggestions which may be of some value to you: Contact Bob Lang at Readwatchdo.com. Bob is a real Stickley authority and a really nice guy so he may be able to help. Contact Stickley-Audi to see if they have anything in their archives. They bought the remnants of Stickley’s business as I understand it. Sorry that I don’t have anything definite for you.

-- Art

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jpsexton

25 posts in 696 days


#2 posted 11-04-2015 03:16 PM

Art-
Good idea and honestly I hadn’t thought of that. Last night I dropped both a quick email outlining what I was looking for, fingers crossed for a response.

Thanks again,

Jason

-- There is an easy way and a hard way and I always seem choose the hard way. Figure it's the best way to learn.

View BobLang's profile

BobLang

124 posts in 2860 days


#3 posted 11-05-2015 12:26 AM

You can come pretty close with the known dimensions you have. On paper draw a vertical line on the photo at the front most corner of the case, then extend the horizontal lines to intersect the vertical. Measure that line and divide by 40 (the actual overall height). That gives you a ratio “in photo” distances in relation to “real world” distances. You can then measure things like drawer heights, etc and come pretty close to what it should be. After you establish the vertical distances you can use a similar method to figure out the horizontal distances. You really need to create a drawing or a SketchUp model to tell if you’re on the right track or not.

Way back when I did this manually, nowadays I import the photo into SketchUp and scale it to its real size. Then I can measure parts and create a model at the same time. My book, the “New Woodworker’s Guide to SketchUp” has a chapter devoted to the process.

hope this helps,

Bob

-- Bob Lang, http://readwatchdo.com

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jpsexton

25 posts in 696 days


#4 posted 11-05-2015 12:18 PM

Bob,
Thanks so much for the reply. That’s a great idea and I’ll work on that this weekend hopefully with a bit larger picture. Problem is this is a pdf of a scan of a 105 year old catalog so the image isn’t the best and blowing it up will make it worse as the pixels stretch. I had seen you SketchUp guide and had hoped it might have something like this in there. Looking at SketchUp thare are some plugins that will/may help with this but they seem to require sharper images at a particular angle to work well so this one may be manual.

Again, thanks for the reply and idea on how to manually get the ratios for this project.

Jason

-- There is an easy way and a hard way and I always seem choose the hard way. Figure it's the best way to learn.

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

2410 posts in 1974 days


#5 posted 11-05-2015 12:32 PM

What I do for my guitars is much simpler. With one known dimension I can figure out the whole body size from a picture. Customers are always asking me to replicate some obscure guitar, so I look up a picture online and there is always a known measurement in the scale of the neck frets.

I take that measurement, convert it to MM’s which is easier and tighter, then measure all my needed dimensions. Then I simply use the multiplier determined by the picture measuement compared to what I know is the real-life scale on the length of the neck. I apply that to all sections of the guitar. I usually can hit an overall length/width within 1/8”.

I would think with the known height, depth and width in your picture you could easily determine most other dimensions, even with it sitting offset. I think you could come really, really close.

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

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jpsexton

25 posts in 696 days


#6 posted 11-05-2015 12:51 PM

Paul

This is why I love LJ forums, everyone here is always so helpful and usually has a dozen different ways to get something done. I like the conversion to MM as it also makes the math easier. By the way I love your guitar projects, you’ve got some beautiful examples.

Thanks

Jason

-- There is an easy way and a hard way and I always seem choose the hard way. Figure it's the best way to learn.

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BobLang

124 posts in 2860 days


#7 posted 11-05-2015 06:28 PM

Jason-
The quality of the image can make it difficult and the catalog images are pretty fuzzy. You might try a google image search for that specific piece; better photos may be out there.

-- Bob Lang, http://readwatchdo.com

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jpsexton

25 posts in 696 days


#8 posted 11-05-2015 07:03 PM

Bob-
Great minds think alike, I was already doing that when you replied.. I’ve only found one image, it’s from the same catalog but in black and white not the tan background as above and it does show the details a bit better. This is a unique piece from what I can tell, I’ve found the 841 which is smaller and reversed, the drawers are in the center with cabinets on each end and there is no mirror. I’ll keep looking while I start drawing this up.

Thanks again for all the help on this. Really looking forward to starting work on this project.

Jason

-- There is an easy way and a hard way and I always seem choose the hard way. Figure it's the best way to learn.

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