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Are shooting boards a 20th century crutch?

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Forum topic by TopamaxSurvivor posted 11-03-2015 06:00 AM 1161 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TopamaxSurvivor

17654 posts in 3136 days


11-03-2015 06:00 AM

Topic tags/keywords: mitres coping saw plane

Page 23 ~ HOW TO JOIN MOULDINGS; OR, The Arts of Mitring and Coping.

A good mechanic will never plane his mitres, but saw them so accurately that they will fit to a hair when placed together.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence


13 replies so far

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Rick M

7909 posts in 1841 days


#1 posted 11-03-2015 07:15 AM

Your book was written in 1892, seems like they were a 19th century crutch.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Dez

1162 posts in 3538 days


#2 posted 11-03-2015 07:37 AM

How’s that working for YOU??
I’ve never gotten a handsaw let alone a power miter saw (regardless of how precise I am) to make a cut that couldn’t use a little hand work to make it better!

-- Folly ever comes cloaked in opportunity!

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TopamaxSurvivor

17654 posts in 3136 days


#3 posted 11-03-2015 08:01 AM

Obviously the author is saying he doesn’t need planning in the 19th; I’m not sure if anyone thought that way in the 20th? Some of the Golden Age wood work I have seen is very impressive. I’m sure it was done at a fairly brisk production rate. I wonder how many subscribed to his way of thinking?

I’m no expert. Just a wannabe. Just curious if anyone is that good now?

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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rwe2156

2190 posts in 941 days


#4 posted 11-03-2015 10:52 AM

Just like today, they were all about efficiency and productivity.

And just like carpenters today, they want it to fit right off the saw – no fiddling around we gotta get going.

It brings out the fact there is a difference between carpentry and ww’ing.

I think if you’ll check you will find shooting boards have a long history the ww’ers bench.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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dbray45

3178 posts in 2237 days


#5 posted 11-03-2015 12:35 PM

One of the things I learned about moldings (after I got most of them done) is the use of shims to make the mitered joint fit. For crown moldings, coping the short molding is a really nice way to allow for movement and still keep it looking nice. For some of the large moldings, they actually used plaster so the expansion matched the walls.

-- David in Damascus, MD

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InstantSiv

259 posts in 1056 days


#6 posted 11-03-2015 12:52 PM

The funny thing is that Owen was actually advocating the use of crutches. LOL

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canadianchips

2345 posts in 2458 days


#7 posted 11-03-2015 04:05 PM

The work “back then” was all hand cut, no power miter saws. I would think the crafstman learned to cut it right the first time !
I looked at buying home that was built in late 1800’s, the floor joist were logs that were dovetailed into the sill.
Probably No chainsaw was used either .

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

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SignWave

317 posts in 2496 days


#8 posted 11-03-2015 05:12 PM

No, but miter boxes are. :D

-- Barry, http://BarrysWorkshop.com/

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Johnny7

208 posts in 551 days


#9 posted 11-03-2015 11:15 PM

Topamax

great question—we need more conversation starters like this one

View ElChe's profile

ElChe

630 posts in 797 days


#10 posted 11-04-2015 02:36 AM

Accurate Miter box would be faster than shooting board. Crutch fight!!!

-- Tom - Measure twice cut once. Then measure again. Curse. Fudge.

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TopamaxSurvivor

17654 posts in 3136 days


#11 posted 11-04-2015 06:12 AM


I think if you ll check you will find shooting boards have a long history the ww ers bench.

- rwe2156

Link doesn’t seem to want to work ;-(


One of the things I learned about moldings (after I got most of them done) is the use of shims to make the mitered joint fit.
- dbray45

David, How do you shim a mitered joint?


Accurate Miter box would be faster than shooting board. Crutch fight!!!

- ElChe

I’ll make the popcorn ;-)

He did do quite an explanation on making the perfectly accurate mitre box ;-)

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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dbray45

3178 posts in 2237 days


#12 posted 11-04-2015 01:34 PM

You put a small shim behind the outside edge of the molding that is not at the correct angle, tilting it out and closing the gap. This takes care of the 1 – 1.5 degree error of the door frame, window frame, wall, or your error. The gap behind is always filled with caulk.

The problem is not usually the miter saw but I have had a couple of power miter saws that did not hold a 45 degree angle. I now use an old Craftsman which was a Millers Fall miter saw (manual) because it cuts more accurately and smoother.

For Christmas I am getting a shooting plane (Veritas) and will be making a shooting board.

Why you ask, because there are times in making frames and boxes that you want a super clean face that this will give. I have had a need for it and have used bench planes in a pinch but the results were not what I was looking for. Without buying a guillotine type of cutter for frames, which occupies a lot of space and what I consider a uni-tasker, this seems to be the right choice for me. The interesting challenge is to make the shooting board the way I want it – to support a wide degree of flexibility. Still working on the design.

-- David in Damascus, MD

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stefang

15512 posts in 2795 days


#13 posted 11-04-2015 04:37 PM

Hi Bob, interesting discussion. My grandson is building a box with mitered corners for himself. Once the material was prepared he cut them with a hand powered frame type miter saw as shown below. These saws have pretty fine teeth much like the hand held dovetail type saws used in the past.

My grandson’s miters were a great fit (even with one side slightly longer than the other) and did not require any planing afterward. I assume that the professional joiners of the past would have learned to make perfect miter cuts to save a lot of extra time planing. Remember, planing doesn’t only take extra time but the plane blades had to be sharpened as needed too and that was also a time consuming task, so I imagine they never used their planes unnecessarily.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

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