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Spray gun vs compressor

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Forum topic by jay0416 posted 11-02-2015 10:19 PM 674 views 1 time favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jay0416

2 posts in 431 days


11-02-2015 10:19 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question spray gun compressor

I have a Bostitch 6 gal. compressor currently used with a nailer, and would like to know if I can use it with a spray gun that requires 3.7cfm. The compressor states in the outside that it is 2.6cfm at 90 PSI. I would like to know how I could determine the type of paint spray gun I could use with my compressor.


11 replies so far

View ForestGrl's profile

ForestGrl

445 posts in 554 days


#1 posted 11-02-2015 10:58 PM



I have a Bostitch 6 gal. compressor currently used with a nailer, and would like to know if I can use it with a spray gun that requires 3.7cfm. The compressor states in the outside that it is 2.6cfm at 90 PSI. I would like to know how I could determine the type of paint spray gun I could use with my compressor.

- jay0416

Is the Bostitch an oil-less compressor, similar to the ubiquitous Porter Cable pancake compressor? They don’t stand up to continuous running. I think my PC is rated for “50%” which means it can actually run 50% of the time it’s being used, any more than that and parts will fail. A local tool repair guy showed me the insides of one that had been over-matched, it wasn’t pretty. What about an inexpensive HVLP sprayer? (independent unit, does not require a compressor) I know a production woodworker who uses this Earlex Spray Station. There are sure to be smaller, less expensive units available—I had one years ago for a specific project.

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

View Alexl's profile

Alexl

57 posts in 409 days


#2 posted 11-02-2015 11:37 PM

i recently purchased the Homeright finishmax fine finish sprayer and i am very impressed. I had low expectations due to it being al all-in one sprayer but it puts down a pretty nice finish for a $70 gun. It is an HVLP with built in turbine.

View ForestGrl's profile

ForestGrl

445 posts in 554 days


#3 posted 11-03-2015 02:01 AM

That’


i recently purchased the Homeright finishmax fine finish sprayer and i am very impressed. I had low expectations due to it being al all-in one sprayer but it puts down a pretty nice finish for a $70 gun. It is an HVLP with built in turbine.

- Alexl

That’s a nice, compact tool! They also make this model, which is very similar to the Wagner I mentioned above.

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

View SuperCubber's profile

SuperCubber

877 posts in 1752 days


#4 posted 11-03-2015 04:48 AM

I agree with the above. I have the Wagner Control Spray Max and love it. It was around $100-$120 and lays down a very nice finish once you get it dialed in. I must note that I have only used it with water based dyes and finishes.

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115207 posts in 3045 days


#5 posted 11-03-2015 05:20 AM

There’s a lot to consider when thinking about spraying,what kind of material are you going to spray? what viscosity will it atomise at ? what kind of environment are you spraying in ? There’s much more to consider including what kind of spraying equipment . As to your question ,spray guns use a big volume of air so it’s not always how high of pressure you can get from your compressor.As a general rule (unless your spray with a air brush or spraying very small projects ,think of a compressor with a minimum 20 gal tank and at least 2hp. This is not a hard and fast rule Less will work depending on a lot of factors and more is better.
This might help.

http://www.parex.com/tech-bulletins/common/TB042-UNDERSTANDINGCONVENTIONALANDHVLPSPRAYGUNS.pdf

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

394 posts in 687 days


#6 posted 11-03-2015 11:52 AM

you can use any spray gun on the market with your compressor.HOWEVER
you will have a very short spray time before pressure drops causing spraying problems and the compressor will run A LOT causing heat and moisture build up which will cause problems. this is a good article on drying compressed air and has some homemade solutions
http://www.powdercoatguide.com/2014/06/how-to-dry-compressed.html#.VjifOY4o7MJ

normally, when the psi is decreased the cfm increases. on those lil compressors the cfm at lower psi isnt stated because those compressors arent intended for spraying finishes. just the quick bursts of nail guns mainly.

it is possible if the projects being finished are small. i did it before i got a much larger compressor.
if you do it, one thing to do is keep the drain on the compressor cracked uoen just a bit so moisture can drain out

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1063 posts in 1457 days


#7 posted 11-03-2015 01:07 PM

It’s a function of how fast you need to apply finish, i.e. how large an object are you going to be spraying. For small boxes, bowls, picture frames, knick knacks, 1 or 2 items at a time your compressor will work. Full size furniture, no, it won’t keep up. As a hobbyist, HVLP or LVLP is what you want. Here is a good comparison of HVLP conversion and turbines http://www.spraygunworld.com/Information2/Compressors/Whatisacompressor.html.

I use a conversion HVLP with a compressor. Compressor is 1.6 hp, 150 psi, 5.3 cfm 90 psi, 6.2 psi 40 psi, 110v, 2 cyl oil lubed. The gun is rated at 13 cfm. When spraying a large kitchen table top, I will need to let the compressor catch up, but it isn’t a problem. Anything smaller is not a problem because the gun off time is enough to let the compressor keep up. I don’t have issues with water, and it gets humid in Missouri in the summer. I use a small disposable inline filter made for spraying.

If one doesn’t need compressed air available, or needs portability of the sprayer, then a turbine HVLP can be considered. The turbine and gun HVLP’s are more or less matched sets (a different model, not a replacement), so changing to a different gun means changing both. With compressed air, just the gun can change.

The media to be sprayed makes a big difference, particularly solvent vs water based. Atomization of the finish is key to a great finish. Solvent finishes can be thinned a great deal and made to work with about any gun. WB finishes have limits on how much they can be thinned. IMO WB finishes need a gun designed for WB to get proper atomization for a great finish. Some have complained when using turbine systems with water based finishes, others say they work fine. I don’t have experience with them. Either gun design will need multiple tips to deal with different viscosity materials.

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

16244 posts in 3686 days


#8 posted 11-03-2015 02:03 PM

As others have noted, the big problem with using a small compressor/tank combo with a spray gun is the lack of air volume. The compressor will run almost constantly to try to keep up with supplying all the air the gun is using. That being said, it really comes down to what kind of project you want to spray. Something small, like a box or a guitar, will be no problem because you don’t need to use the gun for more than a couple of minutes at a time. But try spraying a large piece of furniture and you’ll likely burn up the compressor.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View ForestGrl's profile

ForestGrl

445 posts in 554 days


#9 posted 11-03-2015 10:57 PM


I agree with the above. I have the Wagner Control Spray Max and love it. It was around $100-$120 and lays down a very nice finish once you get it dialed in. I must note that I have only used it with water based dyes and finishes.

- SuperCubber

That’s probably the closest thing Wagners has to the unit I bought years ago. I sprayed paint with that one, and it worked well. Don’t remember if it was water- or oil-based. Glad to see some members pitch in with knowledge about spraying equipment!

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2326 posts in 1764 days


#10 posted 11-04-2015 12:30 AM

I live near a scrap metal yard – I see Bostich compressors there on a semi regular basis, so pushing it to spray paint would be a mistake in my mind. Get a dedicated HVLP unit, even the Harbor Freight one, over trying to shoot with your compressor.

View DocWhoops's profile

DocWhoops

1 post in 403 days


#11 posted 11-04-2015 01:37 AM

Another problem for small compressors is motor speed. A lot of them run at 3450RPM, which is double over practically every other motor. Why? because it greatly increases the CFM of a small compressor, making it act bigger than it is, recover faster under normal use, and shaves weight. It also creates more noise, more heat, and therefore shortens the lifespan of the unit. Add to that, a lot of them are oil-less, and you’ve got a pretty cheap recipe for a dead compressor.

Anything with a small tank will run out of air pretty fast, and you’ll have to wait for it to recover, plus account for the duty cycle and let the machine rest. And you’ll have to recognize when the pressure drops and your spray pattern is affected. Maybe you could find a touchup or mini gun that could work for smaller projects. I have a Makita Mac2400 that I’ve used just in that way – small projects, intermittent spraying, and small cfm gun. But the Mac2400 is oiled, slower rpm, and a bit heavier duty than a small pancake.

But if you’re looking to do large projects with a full size gun, you’ll need a much bigger compressor, something that can push at least 4-6CFM at 100% duty cycle.

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