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Non-slip surface

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Forum topic by Charles Culp posted 12-17-2009 03:18 AM 1251 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Charles Culp

13 posts in 2643 days


12-17-2009 03:18 AM

Topic tags/keywords: non-slip rubber cutting board

I want to make a cutting board for my sister-in-law. It needs to fit over her sink, but I cannot measure it. To do this, I was thinking I would adhere a non-slip surface to the bottom.

Does anyone have any ideas for how to best do this? Does anyone know of a good non-slip surface I can bond to the bottom? She does not have a dishwasher, so it only needs to be hand-washing friendly. But it does need to be somewhat food-safe (it will always be on the bottom) and does need to stay “stuck” even when wet.

-- Charles Culp, www.ThinShavings.com


11 replies so far

View JasonWagner's profile

JasonWagner

527 posts in 2647 days


#1 posted 12-17-2009 03:52 AM

Maybe some thin rubber feet on the corners. I used screw in ones from HD with a built in metal washer and they’re pretty low profile. By the way, I don’t think any wood cutting board will survive a dishwaher!

-- some day I hope to have enough clamps to need a clamp cart!

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Joe

185 posts in 2860 days


#2 posted 12-19-2009 12:04 AM

I “m with Jason, I also use the rubber feet.

-- Senior Chief

View Charles Culp's profile

Charles Culp

13 posts in 2643 days


#3 posted 12-21-2009 12:55 AM

Thanks for the tips. I went to HD and saw their rubber feet. The only ones they had that might work had metal in them, and I was afraid it might rust. I purchased some adhesive cork feet, I want to try those first. I should have a status update after Christmas.

Cutting board was cut to length, jointed edges, and I cut biscuit slots. It is now glued and sitting overnight. Tomorrow I will clean up the cut ends, and rout a 1/4” roundover. I also plan on testing out a walnut oil finish on the maple wood.

-- Charles Culp, www.ThinShavings.com

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cabinetmaster

10874 posts in 3025 days


#4 posted 12-21-2009 01:22 AM

Walnut oil finish is not Food safe. I would be afraid to use it for a cutting board. Mineral oil or salad bowl finish is best.

-- Jerry--A man can never have enough tools or clamps

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Charles Culp

13 posts in 2643 days


#5 posted 12-21-2009 03:06 PM

Well, I purchased the Walnut oil in a shop that sells cooking oils ( https://www.vomfassusa.com/commerce/product.jsp?prodId=193&catId=39&#product ), and it was sold as an oil to be used for dressings. So if it is not “food safe” then we are really in trouble, as I keep it in the kitchen cabinet.

Also, I thought that “salad bowl finish” was actually Walnut oil, I will do some research.

-- Charles Culp, www.ThinShavings.com

View FatScratch's profile

FatScratch

189 posts in 2770 days


#6 posted 12-21-2009 03:16 PM

Your walnut oil is “food safe,” as it is edible; however what Cabinetmaster is probably getting at is that it will go rancid over time. The oil will penetrate the wood and go rancid, mineral oil will not.

View pvwoodcrafts's profile

pvwoodcrafts

234 posts in 3388 days


#7 posted 12-21-2009 03:35 PM

I made one for my wife kinda like that. I made baton strips 1×1 x whatever width , to fit inside the sink bowl and hold the cutting board in place over the sink. Used countersunk SS screws to attach. worked fine for over 10 years. I also prefer mineral oil for cuttingboards

-- mike & judy western md. www. pvwoodcrafts.com pvwccf1@verizon.net

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JasonWagner

527 posts in 2647 days


#8 posted 12-21-2009 03:46 PM

These guys have a good point Charles. The general rule is not to use any vegetable/plant based oil because it can go rancid. I don’t have experience with walnut oil but I’m sure a Google search will answer that. Food safe mineral oil is pretty standard. I just made a few and had good luck with 50% thinned down salad bowl finish from Woodcraft following the Wood Whisperer’s guidelines.

-- some day I hope to have enough clamps to need a clamp cart!

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cabinetmaster

10874 posts in 3025 days


#9 posted 12-21-2009 04:14 PM

I’m sorry I did not explain myself. Yes Walnut oil will go rancid and create a mess. Trying to clean and refinishing will take some time to accomplish. Hope this makes it a little more clear. Woodwhisperer has a good recipe for his and That is what I have been using too.

-- Jerry--A man can never have enough tools or clamps

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Charles Culp

13 posts in 2643 days


#10 posted 12-22-2009 12:46 AM

Great, I’m glad to hear the clarifications. I will do more of my own research for what I want, and it won’t be Walnut oil!

-- Charles Culp, www.ThinShavings.com

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Charles Culp

13 posts in 2643 days


#11 posted 12-22-2009 03:16 AM

Thoughts & ideas? Does anyone have an absolute answer? Erik below seems to think it can be done, and he shows how to properly use Walnut Oil.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walnut_oil

http://www.erikorganic.com/blog/labels/safe%20wood%20finish.html

I’m already sold against using it in this application. I’m just curious now. I’d be interested in trying it on something that I am not giving away to someone else.

-- Charles Culp, www.ThinShavings.com

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