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Veneer edging on mdf

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Forum topic by Kurt T. Kneller posted 11-02-2015 03:56 PM 400 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Kurt T. Kneller

104 posts in 825 days


11-02-2015 03:56 PM

Has anyone here used heat activated glue veneer edging on mdf?
If so, what was your experience and what would your recommendations be?
This to dress the edges of a router table top.

Thanks!

-- Start with ten, end with ten.......


7 replies so far

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

3341 posts in 2546 days


#1 posted 11-02-2015 04:29 PM

First, I have to state I tend to be a little rough on edges, I tend to make an L shaped piece of wood with
the short leg of the L the same as the thickness of the mdf. Then I glue and clamp with a few short
screws through the long leg of the L. I tried using banding, but it would not stand up to my treatment.

-- As ever, Gus-the 77 yr young apprentice carpenter

View Kurt T. Kneller's profile

Kurt T. Kneller

104 posts in 825 days


#2 posted 11-02-2015 05:35 PM



First, I have to state I tend to be a little rough on edges, I tend to make an L shaped piece of wood with
the short leg of the L the same as the thickness of the mdf. Then I glue and clamp with a few short
screws through the long leg of the L. I tried using banding, but it would not stand up to my treatment.

- Bluepine38

I am concerned about the durability also. I am not sure about making a “L” type of trim since I am planning on laminating the backside also. I did have 3/4” red oak trim on it until yesterday. I was routing it flush to the table when the grain changed directions and then split apart and there was no chance of repairing it. Fortunately, the panel was of generous proportions allowing me to remove all the trim to get back to ground 0 with no loss of usable work surface. I am just looking at different options, may some 1/4” stock instead. I would really like the edging to be wood as opposed to laminate.

-- Start with ten, end with ten.......

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

1738 posts in 599 days


#3 posted 11-02-2015 06:25 PM

The edge grain of MDF really soaks up glue. I have used hardwood edging on all my tables and I always put a layer of glue on the MDF, let it dry, then glue the edging to it. The first layer of glue kinda seals up the porous core of the MDF. I have never had issues using hardwood this way but can’t speak for laminates.

I usually use oak edging but it can be hard to route if it has gnarly grain. I would suggest trying a different hardwood, or even soft wood for that matter, as opposed to using laminate. Maple (hard or soft) might be a good choice. I also trimmed the oak on my last table flush with a low angle block plane instead of the router. With a sharp iron, it’ll cut through funky grain with ease.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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Kurt T. Kneller

104 posts in 825 days


#4 posted 11-02-2015 07:23 PM



The edge grain of MDF really soaks up glue. I have used hardwood edging on all my tables and I always put a layer of glue on the MDF, let it dry, then glue the edging to it. The first layer of glue kinda seals up the porous core of the MDF. I have never had issues using hardwood this way but can t speak for laminates.

I usually use oak edging but it can be hard to route if it has gnarly grain. I would suggest trying a different hardwood, or even soft wood for that matter, as opposed to using laminate. Maple (hard or soft) might be a good choice. I also trimmed the oak on my last table flush with a low angle block plane instead of the router. With a sharp iron, it ll cut through funky grain with ease.

- HokieKen

Priming or sizing the edges with glue is exactly what I did. Believe me, the trim was not going to come off without a trip to the table saw. The grain was pretty straight for the most part. The cabinet is already trim out with red oak, so I would like to keep the same, although the cabinet is maple and that would probably look fine. I’ll try it again but I think I’ll use nothing more than 1/2” stock and this time I’ll mill it to 1 9/16- 1 5/8 instead of 1 3/4”. The top is 1 1/2” thick.

-- Start with ten, end with ten.......

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HokieKen

1738 posts in 599 days


#5 posted 11-02-2015 07:42 PM


Priming or sizing the edges with glue is exactly what I did. Believe me, the trim was not going to come off without a trip to the table saw. The grain was pretty straight for the most part. The cabinet is already trim out with red oak, so I would like to keep the same, although the cabinet is maple and that would probably look fine. I ll try it again but I think I ll use nothing more than 1/2” stock and this time I ll mill it to 1 9/16- 1 5/8 instead of 1 3/4”. The top is 1 1/2” thick.

- Kurt T. Kneller

That should be a good safe approach. Do you have a biscuit jointer? If so, you could use it to get the edging lined up flush with the top so that all of your overhang is on the bottom. That way even if you get some tearout, it wouldn’t be on the visible side.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Kurt T. Kneller's profile

Kurt T. Kneller

104 posts in 825 days


#6 posted 11-02-2015 07:53 PM



That should be a good safe approach. Do you have a biscuit jointer? If so, you could use it to get the edging lined up flush with the top so that all of your overhang is on the bottom. That way even if you get some tearout, it wouldn t be on the visible side.

- HokieKen


No, I did not use my biscuit joiner. Registering the biscuit jointer from the top of the panel and the top of the trim would definitely help with the alignment. I’ll pick up some maple 1” stock and I will joint one edge and keep the excess on the bottom side. Sounds like a good plan. Thanks Hokie!

-- Start with ten, end with ten.......

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HokieKen

1738 posts in 599 days


#7 posted 11-02-2015 08:56 PM


No, I did not use my biscuit joiner. Registering the biscuit jointer from the top of the panel and the top of the trim would definitely help with the alignment. I ll pick up some maple 1” stock and I will joint one edge and keep the excess on the bottom side. Sounds like a good plan. Thanks Hokie!

- Kurt T. Kneller

If you prefer the oak, and you’re gonna use biscuits anyway, you might get by milling it to final size and skipping the overhang all together. You’re most likely not gonna get it perfectly flush all the way around on both sides, but if the bottoms not visible it’s not gonna hurt to have it a little out of flush. Good luck either way and let us know what you end up doing and how it works out. I picked up a biscuit jointer a while back but still haven’t ever used it so I’m curious about how it does for you.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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