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Molding head set questions

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Forum topic by HenryD posted 1669 days ago 6277 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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HenryD

30 posts in 1691 days


1669 days ago

Anyone have any experience using a molding head set in a tablesaw? I recently purchased a used craftsman contractor tablesaw. In the manual it mentions a 7” molding head set as an accessory but to “see catalog.” I don’t know what a part number is for this or if one is made now that will fit my saw.

Looking for some places that might carry this set for craftsman saws. My model number of the saw is 113.298760

Thanks,

HD

-- Put your waste wood to use - http://www.wiseheat.com


18 replies so far

View Moron's profile

Moron

4666 posts in 2479 days


#1 posted 1669 days ago

I cant help you specifically but I had a molding knife made for my smaller TS. It cuts bead mould into door panels….......with no problems

good luck

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View sIKE's profile

sIKE

1271 posts in 2339 days


#2 posted 1669 days ago

I picked up a set off of e-bay a while back. I have them in a drawer, one of these days I am hoping to get a chance to make use of them….

On E-Bay Search for this “CRAFTSMAN 7” MOULDING HEAD 9-3214 W/ 4 CUTTERS”

-- //FC - Round Rock, TX - "Experience is what you get just after you need it"

View TomHintz's profile

TomHintz

207 posts in 1984 days


#3 posted 1669 days ago

I had a molding head set from Sears years ago and used it on my Craftsman RAS and a couple different table saws. It was the three cutter version which I am told worked a bunch better than the two cutter model though I never used the two cutter one myself.
The big thing I had about that molding head is that you had better pay very close attention to what you are doing and take very light cuts. The whirring sound of those cutters is unsettling to say the least. I have heard from several people who simply gave up on the molding head in favor of router-based solutions. I joined those ranks and sold the molding head set to a braver woodworker.

-- Tom Hintz, www.newwoodworker.com

View HenryD's profile

HenryD

30 posts in 1691 days


#4 posted 1669 days ago

If I can find a set in good condition, I’m going to try it. From what I’ve been reading, Sears still sells the set but they don’t provide replacement blades for it.

-- Put your waste wood to use - http://www.wiseheat.com

View dmorrison's profile

dmorrison

145 posts in 1847 days


#5 posted 1669 days ago

http://corobcutters.com/

Call these guys and make sure it will fit your table saw.

Dave

View Ger21's profile

Ger21

610 posts in 1716 days


#6 posted 1669 days ago

How about this one?
http://www.lrhent.com/intro.htm

It’s about $85 on Amazon, and the cutters are about $80 a set.

-- Gerry, http://home.comcast.net/~cncwoodworker/CNC_Woodworker.html

View romanf's profile

romanf

20 posts in 1842 days


#7 posted 1669 days ago

I have used the Magic Molder that Ger21 indicated sold by Amazon. It is almost silent and the molding comes out so smooth it does not need sanding. This unit used carbide instead of steel for the cutters. Worth every penny.

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 2574 days


#8 posted 1669 days ago

I have the sears model and I use it when I need to.

I always go through Sears’s discount bin when I am ever in the store. I always seem to find cutters in there for cheap. I think I have all of the except maybe one or two.

You just need to check the arbor size of your saw to make sure that it will fit. Usually 5/8” which is what you need.

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View Andrew Betschman's profile

Andrew Betschman

279 posts in 1809 days


#9 posted 1668 days ago

The molding head still has many uses in the woodworking shop just like the radial arm saw. They are both underutilized.

-- Andrew, Ohio http://andrewmbetschman.com/

View drfixit's profile

drfixit

318 posts in 1729 days


#10 posted 1668 days ago

I have a Sears set… model number is 9 3215… but it was made in 1975

-- I GIVE UP!!!! I've cut this @!&*!% board 3 times.... its still too short!

View HenryD's profile

HenryD

30 posts in 1691 days


#11 posted 1668 days ago

I’ve been looking for some directions for how to use it. Suppose I wanted to make new interior door trim, do you use a combination of blades in the head and do the cutting incrementally. How do you use the set exactly? The woodworking books I have and use don’t even mention the set.

HD

-- Put your waste wood to use - http://www.wiseheat.com

View drfixit's profile

drfixit

318 posts in 1729 days


#12 posted 1668 days ago

Henry – I will scan the instruction sheets that are in my set and send them to you when i get home this evening. One set of blades in the cutter head at a time.

-- I GIVE UP!!!! I've cut this @!&*!% board 3 times.... its still too short!

View LesB's profile

LesB

1056 posts in 2028 days


#13 posted 1667 days ago

Sears still sells these sets and they fit all 10 inch table and radial arm saws. (the head comes with a bushing sleeve for small arbors) I think they are safer to use on a table saw but have used them on both. You will need a custom size insert for your saw. Home made 1/2” plywood insert works, or buy a commercial blank and cut the proper hole. Besides the 3 cutter head they use to make a single cutter head model. I have both but seldom use the single. I have used them quite a bit and they work well. I have even ground my own custom shaped cutters from the square ended cutters that come in the set. The cutters make a lot of wind noise while running which is a bit intimidating at first.

Don’t mix different blades on the cutter head at one time. Make each pattern cut consecutively. Start shallow and make progressive cuts, raising the cutter head with each pass until you reach the desired depth of cut. Make the last cut very shallow to provide the best finish. They can be hand sharpened fairly easily too.
IMPORTANT:
Think about how the wood will be supported during the cutting. If you are cutting on the face of a board it may involve making your proposed cut in the center of an oversize board so the outer edges support it during the successive passes. Then saw off the excess when you finish your molding cuts. If your board is not wide enough you could fasten some support strips on each side with brads, hot glue, or carpet tape.

They make a great substitute for a expensive shaper or molding cutter. Just use you imagination. If you have more questions send me a PM.
Practice with some soft wood like pine to get familiar with how they work.

-- Les B, Oregon

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LesB

1056 posts in 2028 days


#14 posted 1667 days ago

I forgot to add that Sears sells (as least they use to) a “blade” guard designed for these cutter heads for use on Radial Arm saws. It is just a simple plastic shield but it is better than nothing.

Also use feather boards when ever you can. They not only keep the successive passes through the cutter uniform they add a safety feature in case of some kick back. I have never had any kick back but it is always possible.

Take your time but don’t go to slow or you will get some burn marks.

-- Les B, Oregon

View Andrew Betschman's profile

Andrew Betschman

279 posts in 1809 days


#15 posted 1476 days ago

Also a wider broad and longer is better to run short and narrow board!

-- Andrew, Ohio http://andrewmbetschman.com/

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