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Protecting against CA Adhesive staining

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Forum topic by ShowLowLinks posted 12-15-2009 07:33 AM 870 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ShowLowLinks

3 posts in 2567 days


12-15-2009 07:33 AM

Hi All,

First post. Great site!

I am currently working on a juniper rustic coffee table for my cabin’s patio area. The weather at the cabin is typical mountain weather (snow, etc.). I have a multi-part question that has got me stalled-out at the moment. I’m trying my hand at stone inlay work on the table in order to fill the natural voids (Crack, etc.). In an inconspicuous part under the table, I started experimenting with stone inlay and CA adhesive. With bare wood the CA adhesive, the wood was darkly stained considerably. I heard that you can use sanding sealer in the general area of the void (crack) in order to avoid CA adhesive staining. My questions are the following:

1. If I apply lacquer sanding sealer over the entire piece prior to doing the stone inlay, will the lacquer sanding sealer protect the wood from CA adhesive staining?
2. Does the use of lacquer sanding sealer prevent me from using stains, if I want to change the color a bit?
3. If I use a lacquer sanding sealer in order to prevent CA adhesive staining, what options do I have for final finishes that are appropriate for outdoor furniture and provide the most natural and beautiful finishes (I realize this part is subjective)?

Many thanks for any help,

Rob


6 replies so far

View LesB's profile

LesB

1237 posts in 2909 days


#1 posted 12-15-2009 08:48 AM

Why not try using epoxy instead of CA glue?

-- Les B, Oregon

View tomd's profile

tomd

2027 posts in 3236 days


#2 posted 12-15-2009 09:00 AM

A couple of coats of lacquer sealer should hold off the CA, but will also hold off most stains, mainly the dark colors. As to outdoor inlays, wood and stone will expand and contract quite differently under sun, heat and humidity, so the inlays outdoors may not stay fixed, unless you are in a very warm, dry climate.

-- Tom D

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ShowLowLinks

3 posts in 2567 days


#3 posted 12-16-2009 06:22 AM

You make a good point regarding the weather impact on stone inlay. Perhaps I will limit the inlay to one knot and see what happens over time.

Does anyone have suggestions for filling the voids and cracks given that the inlay might come loose in varying weather? Lastly, any opinions on best finish for rustic outdoor furniture?

Thanks,

Rob

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LesB

1237 posts in 2909 days


#4 posted 12-17-2009 07:56 AM

Rob,
I still think two part epoxy is your best bet for you inlay and filling voids and cracks. You can easily color it (colors available at auto supply stores) and because it is more flexible than CA glue and water proof it should stand up better. CA glue will break down with constant exposure to moisture. I would not pre-seal the wood before using the epoxy but you might under cut the opening some to help hold the epoxy filler in place if the wood shrinks.

For a finish you can either buy one of the commercial fence and deck sealing products (I like Behr brand best) or just use boiled linseed oil diluted 50% with mineral spirits. The deck and fence sealers come in clear, clear stains, or opaque colors. Two coats should do it. In either case the finish will only last two or three years in a full exterior exposure before needing a new coat. If you protect them from the elements when not in use they will last longer.

-- Les B, Oregon

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ShowLowLinks

3 posts in 2567 days


#5 posted 12-17-2009 09:18 PM

Thanks Les. I’m going to go with your suggestion and go with the epoxy. I assume the excess epoxy I will inevitably get on the bare wood can be sanded down thoroughly enough (following the filling of the cracks and voids) that it will not impact the final finish. Once the epoxy is completed, I will finish with the 50/50 boiled linseed oil/mineral spirits.

Many thanks. You guys helped a bunch.

Rob

View Kent Shepherd's profile

Kent Shepherd

2718 posts in 2752 days


#6 posted 12-18-2009 12:13 AM

I would not use lacquer sealer outside. It will not hold up, so the top coat, even though it may be exterior, will turn loose too.

-- http://shepherdtoolandsupply.com/

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